Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Campus Community

Queen’s partners with Library and Archives Canada

[Queen's University Library and Library and Archives Canada]
Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, left, took part in a special panel discussion with, from left, Paul Banfield, University Archivist, Paul Robertson, City Curator, City of Kingston, Patricia Enright, Chief Librarian, Kingston Frontenac Public Library, Rosaleen Hill, Program Director, Department of Art Conservation and Art History Jan Allen, Director, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, and Martha Whitehead, Vice-Provost (Digital Planning) and University Librarian. (Photo by Bernard Clark) 

Queen’s University has officially entered into a partnership with Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

In an agreement signed on Thursday, Queen’s and LAC pledged to work together to share expertise and knowledge; to collaborate in supporting academic advancement, research practices and technological developments; and to proactively facilitate community outreach to promote Canadian documentary heritage.

Going forward the university will work with LAC on topics of interest to the Queen’s community and to cross-promote their shared initiatives.  LAC will also continue to host Queen’s students through work placement programs and inviting members of the Queen’s community to participate in conferences.

“We are excited to formally acknowledge our commitment to collaborating with each other to increase our impact, and to lead the way forward in developing services, resources and technologies to support our communities,” says Martha Whitehead, Vice-Provost (Digital Planning) and University Librarian.

In concert with this agreement, the library welcomed Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, to meet local librarians, archivists and directors of galleries and museums on Thursday, May 25 in Stauffer Library. This informal gathering included a panel of speakers who explored the evolving world of GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums).

In addition to Dr. Berthiaume, speakers included Patricia Enright, Chief Librarian, Kingston Frontenac Public Library, and Paul Robertson, City Curator, City of Kingston, and several Queen’s individuals – Jan Allen, Director, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Paul Banfield, University Archivist, Rosaleen Hill, Program Director, Department of Art Conservation and Art History, and Martha Whitehead, Vice-Provost (Digital Planning) and University Librarian.  

Ideas for future initiatives with LAC are welcome – contact Queen’s University Library with any ideas.  

Marking milestone achievements

  • Principal Daniel Woolf presented certificates to faculty and staff members marking milestone years, including Heather Wolsey, left, for 45 years, and Bonnie Brooks, who has worked at Queen's for 50 years. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Principal Daniel Woolf presented certificates to faculty and staff members marking milestone years, including Heather Wolsey, left, for 45 years, and Bonnie Brooks, who has worked at Queen's for 50 years. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Staff and faculty marking 25 years of continuous service at Queen's University gather for a photo together at the Celebration of Service on Thursday, May 4. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Staff and faculty marking 25 years of continuous service at Queen's University gather for a photo together at the Celebration of Service on Thursday, May 4. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • The annual Celebration of Service was held to recognize faculty and staff members reaching milestone years of employment, including a large group at 30 years. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    The annual Celebration of Service was held to recognize faculty and staff members reaching milestone years of employment, including a large group at 30 years. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Staff and faculty marking 35 years of continuous service at Queen's University were recognized at the Celebration of Service on Thursday, May 4. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Staff and faculty marking 35 years of continuous service at Queen's University were recognized at the Celebration of Service on Thursday, May 4. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Staff and faculty members who have worked for Queen's University for 40 years received certificates to mark the milestone at the Celebration of Service. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Staff and faculty members who have worked for Queen's University for 40 years received certificates to mark the milestone at the Celebration of Service. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Queen’s employees who have reached milestone achievements of continuous service were recognized by the university during the annual Celebration of Service on Thursday May, 4.

A total of 131 staff and faculty members were honoured for their contributions while reaching employment milestones of 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 years at Queen’s during the ceremony at Ban Righ Dining Hall.

This year’s event was highlighted by Bonnie Brooks' achievement of reaching the 50-year milestone.

After arriving at Queen’s in 1967 to work as a typist in the order department at Douglas Library, Ms. Brooks became an intermediate clerk in the Interlibrary Loans Department in January 1968 and then joined the Special Collection Department in January 1969. That July she returned to the Interlibrary Loans Department as the interlibrary loans coordinator, a position she has held for 48 years.

“Forty-eight years as the interlibrary loans coordinator – I love this job, I find it rewarding,” Ms. Brooks said at the event. “I believe it to be one of the most, if not the most, interesting jobs in the library. I enjoy the interaction with the Queen’s community from professors to students to staff. It has been amazing to see the changes that have taken place in the last 50 years.”

The dinner event, attended by the recipients, their families and friends, as well as Principal Daniel Woolf, was hosted by Dan Bradshaw, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources).

CELEBRATION OF SERVICE 

Congratulations to the following employees as they celebrate a milestone at Queen's University this year.

25 Years

Constance Adamson; Diane Anderson; Yahia Antar; Oleg Bogoyavlenskij; Kris Bowes; Julie Clarke; Gary Contant; Brian Coughtrey; Kimberley Dixon; Marina Djurfeldt; Gerald Ducharme; Matthew Faris; Wendy Gratto; Mark Green; Lynne Hanson; Joan Harcourt; Thomas Krause; Karen Leveque; Gail MacAllister; Hugh MacDonald; Kimberly Mackinder; Mary Ann McColl; Dean McKeown; Adele Mercier; Anne Mitchell-Ste Marie; Sharon Mohammed; Kim Moore; Jackie Moore; Marie Myers; Lisa Neumann; Lynn O'Malley; David Parker; Elvira Posthumus; Karen Rudie; Peggy Shanks; Heather Stanton; David Wehlau; David Yen.

30 Years

Anthony Amodeo; Patricia Anderson; William Bendena; Brian Bennett; Maggie Berg; James Bergin; John Burge; Marie Civin; Catherine Conaghan; Joe DeGroot; David Dennie; Terrie Easter Sheen; Jeanna Faul; G. Cynthia Fekken; Steve Ferguson; Nan Fern; Thomas Fraser; David Garrison; Marco Giacomello; Douglas Graham; Daniel Gratto; Drew Griffith; Joe Guigue; Tammy Henry; Ann Marie Hill; Merry Horton; James Edward Howard; Noel James; Lorne Johnston; Kevin Knott; Dale Kristensen; Vladimir Krstic; Kathleen Lahey; Marilyn Lavoie; Daniel Lefebvre; Suzanne Maranda; Patty McHenry; Peter McLaren; Jeffrey Mewburn; James Mingo; Janice Mitton; Susan Moffatt; Jeffrey Moon; William Morrow; Marilyn Oosten; Kenneth Payne; Catherine Pearson; Marilyn Redmond; Natalie Rewa; Michael Rioux; Karen Schultz; Tracey St John; Walter St Pierre; Sandra Tallen; Anna Tavares; Judy Vanhooser; Margaret Watkin; Katherine Webb; Iain Young; Judy Young; Noriko Yui.

35 Years

Lonnie Aarssen; R. David Andrew; Peter Brown; Chyrle Campsall; John Cartledge; Susan Cole; Anna De Matos; Elizabeth Eisenhauer; Steven Humphrey; Richard Hunt; Jacob Jeswiet; Gregory McAuley; Melody Monte; Guy Narbonne; Christopher Pickles; Lloyd Rhymer; David Skillicorn; Mike Smith; Donna Stover; Sharon Sullivan; Larke Zarichny.

40 Years

Angela Briceland; Brenda Bullock; Peter Davies; Jennifer Dee; Elizabeth Gibson; Peter Richardson; Tom Russell; Nadine Thompson.

45 Years

Necole Bresee; Heather Wolsey.

50 Years

Bonnie Brooks.

 

 

Spring convocation gets underway

  • Honorary degree recipient James Rutka (Meds’81) speaks to the graduates from the School of Medicine and School of Nursing during Thursday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
    Honorary degree recipient James Rutka (Meds’81) speaks to the graduates from the School of Medicine and School of Nursing during Thursday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
  • Chancellor Jim Leech congratulates and poses for a photo with a graduate after she received her PhD during Thursday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
    Chancellor Jim Leech congratulates and poses for a photo with a graduate after she received her PhD during Thursday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
  • Deputy Provost Teri Shearer, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Cam Yung preside over the first of 21 ceremonies for Spring Convocation at Queen's on Thursday, May 25.
    Deputy Provost Teri Shearer, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Cam Yung preside over the first of 21 ceremonies for Spring Convocation at Queen's on Thursday, May 25.
  • Graduands give a round of applause to their family and friends who have supported them throughout their studies during Thursday's first ceremony of Spring Convocation.
    Graduands give a round of applause to their family and friends who have supported them throughout their studies during Thursday's first ceremony of Spring Convocation.
  • Graduands, family, and friends fill Grant Hall on the opening day of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall, on Thursday, May 25.
    Graduands, family, and friends fill Grant Hall on the opening day of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall, on Thursday, May 25.

Spring Convocation got underway at Queen’s University with the first two of 21 of ceremonies being held at Grant Hall on Thursday, May 25.

The first ceremony featured graduates from a number of Smith School of Business graduate programs while the afternoon featured the School of Medicine and School of Nursing.

During the afternoon ceremony an honorary degree was conferred upon James Rutka (Meds’81), a pediatric neurosurgeon and professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of Surgery.

A live feed of each ceremony will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each event. 

For a full schedule of the ceremonies, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Taking on transformational leadership

  • Managers from across Queen’s University gathered May 5 for the second annual HR Summit. Hosted by the Human Resources Department at Goodes Hall, the summit featured a keynote address by Julian Barling (Smith School of Business), who spoke about how advanced ideas on leadership can be translated into everyday leadership behaviours and the positive impact.
    Managers from across Queen’s University gathered May 5 for the second annual HR Summit. Hosted by the Human Resources Department at Goodes Hall, the summit featured a keynote address by Julian Barling (Smith School of Business), who spoke about how advanced ideas on leadership can be translated into everyday leadership behaviours and the positive impact.
  • Managers from across Queen’s University had an opportunity to network and connect with related partners during the  second annual HR Summit, hosted by the Human Resources Department at Goodes Hall.
    Managers from across Queen’s University had an opportunity to network and connect with related partners during the second annual HR Summit, hosted by the Human Resources Department at Goodes Hall.
  • Attendees of the second annual HR Summit were able to ask questions as part of a panel discussion about current HR projects and initiatives was held
    Attendees of the second annual HR Summit were able to ask questions as part of a panel discussion about current HR projects and initiatives was held
  • The  panel discussion featured Marie Doherty, Director, Client Services and Organizational Development & Learning, Diane Pointer, Director, Total Compensation, Heather Shields, Director and Counsel, Employee and Labour Relations, and special guest Steve Tanner, Director, Finance and Administration within the Faculty of Arts and Science, who provided insight from a client perspective.
    The panel discussion featured Marie Doherty, Director, Client Services and Organizational Development & Learning, Diane Pointer, Director, Total Compensation, Heather Shields, Director and Counsel, Employee and Labour Relations, and special guest Steve Tanner, Director, Finance and Administration within the Faculty of Arts and Science, who provided insight from a client perspective.

Managers from across Queen’s University gathered on May 5 for the second annual HR Summit.

Hosted by the Human Resources Department, the summit was designed to further HR’s commitment to provide continuing education to its clients. It featured a keynote address by Julian Barling (Smith School of Business), who spoke about transformational leadership and how certain approaches can be translated into everyday leadership behaviours that have a positive impact in the workplace.

Following the keynote speech, participants had an opportunity to network with their colleagues and consult with Queen's HR experts.

The connections continued after the break when a panel discussion about current HR projects and initiatives was held. The panelists included Marie Doherty, Director, Client Services and Organizational Development & Learning, Diane Pointer, Director, Total Compensation, Heather Shields, Director and Counsel, Employee and Labour Relations, and special guest Steve Tanner, Director, Finance and Administration within the Faculty of Arts and Science, who provided insight from a client perspective.

Dan Langham, Director, Environmental Health & Safety, and Megan Rhymer, Department Manager, Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, were the door prize winners and each received a copy of Dr. Barling’s book The Science of Leadership: Lessons from Research for Organizational Leaders.

“We are very pleased with the overwhelming response we received from our clients regarding this year’s summit. Not only did this event reach capacity, but the feedback to date has been very positive,” says Dan Bradshaw, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources).

In addition to the summit, Employee and Labour Relations offers customized training sessions for managers throughout the year. Email hrelr@queensu.ca for further details on these sessions. More information about the programs and services offered through Organizational Development & Learning can be found on the HR website.

Convocation a time for celebration

[2017 Convocation]
Family and friends and graduands fill Grant Hall, where 19 of the 21 Spring Convocation ceremonies will be held, starting Thursday, May 25. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

Queen’s graduands will be returning to campus with their families and friends starting this week as this year’s Spring Convocation ceremonies start on Thursday, May 25.

The ceremonies will continue through to Friday, June 9, with a total of 21 ceremonies being held. All ceremonies are being held at Grant Hall with the exception of the two on Tuesday, May 30, which will be held at the Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC).

During Spring Convocation Queen’s will be conferring 11 honorary degrees. The recipients are:

  • James Rutka (Meds’81), professor in the Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, and pediatric neurosurgeon Thursday, May 25 at 2:30 pm.
  • Stephen J.R. Smith (Sc’72), Canadian financial services entrepreneur and philanthropist, Tuesday, May 30 at 2:30 pm.
  • Gururaj (PhD’79) and Jaishree Deshpande, entrepreneurs and philanthropists, Wednesday, May 31 at 10 am.
  • Sir David Skegg, epidemiologist and public health physician, and former Vice-Chancellor of   the University of Otago in New Zealand, Friday, June 2 at 10 am.
  • Professor, the Lord Alderdice former Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly, member of the House of Lords, Monday, June 5 at 10 am.
  • Otto Naumann, art expert specializing in Old Master paintings, Tuesday, June 6 at 10 am.
  • Frank McKenna, former premier of New Brunswick and former Canadian ambassador to the U.S., Tuesday, June 6 at 2:30 pm.
  • Arthur McDonald, Queen’s professor emeritus and Nobel laureate, Wednesday, June 7 at 10 am.
  • Fredy Peccerelli, forensic anthropologist and human rights activist, Thursday, June 8 at 10 am.
  • Donald Bayne (Arts’66, Law’69, EMBA’01), lawyer and former Queen’s Gaels quarterback, Friday, June 9 at 2:30 pm.

Justice Kin Kee Pang (Arts’70), a member of Hong Kong’s senior judiciary, received an honorary degree on May 20 in Hong Kong.

A live feed of each ceremony will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each event. 

More information about Spring Convocation is available on the website of the Office of the University Registrar, including a full schedule of the ceremonies.

Recognizing strength, determination of mature women students

[Ban Righ Centre Spring Awards]
Students, staff, benefactors, faculty, family and friends attended the Ban Righ Centre Spring Awards and celebrated the achievements of 14 mature women students at Queen's. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Benefactors, faculty, staff, students, families and friends gathered recently in Grant Hall to celebrate the perseverance and success of 14 mature women students, as they strive to fulfill their educational goals at Queen’s, after time away from school.

While their life stories and journeys are unique, what brings them together is the Ban Righ Centre, an on-campus resource that provides students with study spaces, friendship, daily soup, and a range of supports and programs that aim to make their multi-faceted lives run a little more smoothly.

A series of awards, honouring donors whose generosity supports current and future generations of mature women at Queen’s, are presented each year at the spring celebration. These named endowed bursaries reflect the connection that donors and their families have to the Ban Righ Centre and to Queen’s.

[Ban Righ Centre Spring Awards]
Hazel Ramirez speaks after receiving the Diane McKenzie Award as Diane McKenzie looks on during the Ban Righ Centre Spring Awards event held in Grant Hall. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Hazel Ramirez is a single parent and student in the Master of Nursing (Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner) program. She is the recipient of the Diane McKenzie Award, established to recognize former Dean of Nursing Jean Hill, who made an enormously positive impact on Ms. McKenzie, when she returned to Queen’s to complete a graduate degree.

“These past two years have been far from easy,” says Ms. Ramirez. “Going back to school has taught me to value my sleep, value the people who have stuck by me through the hard times, and especially value my time with my four-year-old son. I was so fortunate to come across the Ban Righ Centre where I was able to meet other students who are in a situation similar to mine, and a group of women who, no matter how busy their schedules may be, are always willing to help in any way they can. It is nice to not only feel welcomed and accepted, but also as though you have a group of people who genuinely want to help you succeed.”

Ban Righ Centre Director Carole Morrison says by sharing stories and experiences, the students draw strength from one another.

“The award recipients provide inspiration to others, who think ‘If these women can do it, so can I,’” Ms. Morrison says. “At the centre, we are committed to responding to an increasingly diverse population of women. We are grateful for the support of many members of the Queen’s and broader communities who assist us in various ways as we deliver programs and services to meet student needs.”

For more information about the centre and the Ban Righ Foundation awards is available on the centre’s website and Facebook page.

University resources related to Manchester

Queen’s University is shocked and saddened by the tragic events which took place in Manchester, United Kingdom on May 22.
 
The university has reached out to all students who are currently in Manchester who are registered with the Queen’s University International Centre. We extend our support to our students in Manchester and their families, and are closely monitoring the situation.
 
If you are a parent or family member with a student abroad on a university program please do not hesitate to call the Queen’s University International Centre at 613-539-7220 or e-mail kotechaj@queensu.ca and we will provide you with updated information as it is available and refer you to the appropriate office on campus, as needed.
 
The university also asks any faculty or staff in Manchester who have not already done so to contact their department heads or the Queen’s University International Centre to inform them of their status.
 
For students currently in the United Kingdom, if you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact the Queen’s University International Centre via e-mail at kotechaj@queensu.ca.
 
We also encourage you to contact the High Commission of Canada in London at +44 (0) 207 004 6000 or email ldn.consular@international.gc.ca.

Students who are citizens of countries other than Canada should contact their appropriate government representatives. Please be mindful of your surroundings, carry your Queen’s emergency card, and check DFATD travel reports for up-to-date travel advisories. Also contact your family and friends to let them know you are safe, if you haven’t already done so.
 
Support for students at Queen’s is available through Student Wellness Services at 613-533-2506 or by dropping in at 146 Stuart Street. Support for faculty and staff is available through the Employee and Family Assistance Program at 1.800.663.1142 or 1.866.398.9505.
 
The university will provide updates to this information throughout the day as necessary.

 

Celebrating 30 years of youth enrichment

Enrichment Studies Unit enters milestone year offering youth a sneak peek at university life.

For the 30th consecutive year, the Queen’s campus is buzzing throughout the spring and summer with programs led by the Enrichment Studies Unit. ESU provides programming for youth in grades 7-12, aimed at providing them with an inside look at the opportunities available to them in post-secondary education.

“As a teacher for over 20 years, I saw firsthand the positive impact the ESU program had for so many of my students,” says Linda Lamoureux, Outreach Coordinator for ESU. “I am proud to be a part of this program which challenges students academically, develops them personally, and inspires them with an exceptional Queen’s University experience.”

Students take part in a chemistry class during the Enrichment Mini Course, which gives students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to experience university life. (Photo Credit: ESU)

The beginning of May saw the successful completion of the Enrichment Mini Course (EMC) week for students in grades 9-12.  During the remaining weeks of May, students in grades 7-8 have the opportunity to take part in Seven Eight Enrichment Days (SEEDS) – which consists of on-campus activities designed to offer a glimpse at university life. Students enroll in classes in a range of disciplines, including art, business, engineering, law, medicine, and programming among others.  From Tuesday to Friday afternoon, participants take in realistic lectures and hands-on learning opportunities led by Queen’s graduate students and faculty. For those wishing to try the full university experience, a residence option includes accommodations in one of the on-campus residence buildings as well.

Many students who enroll in the EMC and SEEDS programs return for the full-week Summer Enrichment Experience at Queen’s (SEEQ) or ESU’s Leadership Training Program (QuEST). The week-long SEEQ program in mid-August provides an even more immersive pre-university experience, with course material designed to challenge and inspire students.

The QuEST program, directed towards students entering grades 7-10, offers three levels of leadership and communications skills development training to help students succeed in academics, extracurricular activities, and in the working world. ESU also offers an Enrichment for Educators program, which provides classroom technology and STEM education programs where teachers and community educators have the opportunity to learn new skills and knowledge.

ESU attracts nearly 1,800 students each year to its range of programs – many of whom return in the following years. ESU participants who decide to enroll at Queen’s often return to work for the program. A testament to the lifelong impact of the program, a number of ESU staff first became involved in the program as student participants.

“I first became involved in ESU in seventh grade and can still remember how excited I was by the opportunity,” says Sam Martin, ESU Office Assistant. “The program instilled in me that I could accomplish anything that I put my mind to. When the opportunity arose to return as a staff member, I was thrilled to have a chance to pay it forward to the next generation of students. Our overarching message to students is that postsecondary education is something obtainable and which offers a wealth of opportunities.”

For more information on the programs offered by the ESU, please visit the website.

ESU participants pose for a group photo in front of Victoria Hall. (Photo Credit: ESU)

 

May 16 edition of the Gazette

The May 16 edition of the Gazette is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus, as well as a number of off-campus locations.

[May 16 Gazette]
Read the May 16 edition of the Gazette.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • A cover article promoting the arrival of an exhibition on the Nobel Prize-winning research by SNOLAB and led by Arthur McDonald.
  • An update on changes to a number of mandates for senior academic leadership members.
  • An article ongoing construction of the Innovation and Wellness Centre, incorporating the former PEC building.
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will hit the newsstands on June 6.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Also visit the Gazette Online for more stories and photos and follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Renewable energy and reconciliation

Queen’s researcher receives CIHR grant for interdisciplinary research program on Indigenous leadership in renewable energy development.

Queen’s University researcher Heather Castleden (Geography and Planning/ Public Health Sciences) has received a $2 million team grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to lead an interdisciplinary research program on Indigenous leadership in renewable energy development for healthy communities.

Dr. Castleden hopes that the project will bring to light new and restored understandings of integrative health by sharing our stories, resources, and tools with Indigenous and Settler governments, industries, ENGOs, universities, and beyond. (Photo Credit: Jon Aarssen)

The program of research, titled A SHARED Future: Achieving Strength, Health, and Autonomy through Renewable Energy Development for the Future, will bring together more than 75 Indigenous and non-Indigenous academics, as well as representatives from various Indigenous and settler governments and organizations across Canada, to examine how fostering Indigenous leadership in renewable energy development has the potential to deliver positive community benefits and spur efforts towards reconciliation.

“Much of my research has involved a Two-Eyed Seeing framework – something I learned from Mi’kmaq Elder Albert Marshal and his colleague, Cheryl Bartlett, who is a retired biologist and former Canada Research Chair in Integrative Science,” explains Dr. Castleden, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Reconciling Relations for Health, Environments, and Communities. “The guiding principle of Two-Eyed Seeing is to bring the best of Indigenous and Western knowledge systems together to try to answer research questions more comprehensively and whole-istically.”

Through this program of research involving multiple projects, Dr. Castleden and her colleagues will examine stories of success in renewable energy development. Amongst other criteria, the research will determine whether Indigenous communities, governments, and organizations are using a business-as-usual model, a joint venture model, a co-operative, or an Indigenous leadership model in their collaborations. The team will also examine how these efforts have the potential to lead towards new and restored understandings for integrative health by reconciling and healing relations between the Indigenous and settler communities, as well as the relationship with the environment.

“For the past 15 years, Dr. Castleden has partnered with Indigenous communities across Canada in conducting community-based, participatory research on issues such as social and environmental justice and health equity,” says John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “This project will not only bring about a better understanding of the impacts of renewable energy development on Indigenous communities, it will also foster a deeper understanding of the requirements necessary to overcome barriers that address relationships and support for Indigenous populations and their communities,  in order for Canadians to pursue meaning reconciliation.”

Indigenous Ways of Knowing will play a central role throughout the design of the program and its various projects, in conceptualizing the team’s research approach, organization and methodology. Dr. Castleden explains that doing so allows the research team to consider issues in a broader and more whole-istic nature. She adds that Indigenous leadership and efforts towards self-determination and autonomy have led to broader inclusion of Indigenous perspectives and knowledge in academic research.

“We have been trained in academia to specialize in our fields, which makes it very difficult to see a problem from multiple generations back or forward, to translate from the individual to the community and beyond – that’s where Indigenous knowledge systems bring the breadth of the issue to light,” she says. “This is especially true with health research. There is, with many Indigenous knowledge systems, the ability to see health issues as being not just about physical health or mental health but also emotional health, cultural and spiritual health and well-being of people. We don’t tend to do that in Western science, so again that’s what makes this make sense.”

Dr. Castleden and her team are one of nine team grants to receive funding under the CIHR Environments and Health Signature Initiatives program. The program aims to support researchers and teams investigating how various sectors can collaborate to promote healthy environments and reduce exposure to the causes of poor health.

For more information on the A SHARED Future project, please visit the HECLab website.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Campus Community