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All-stars in sport and the classroom

  • Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, left, and Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney helped recognize Nixon Academic Leadership Award winners, from second left: Erin Lee, Sam Dobbin, Ejaz Causer, Emily Gervais.
    Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, left, and Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney helped recognize Nixon Academic Leadership Award winners, from second left: Erin Lee, Sam Dobbin, Ejaz Causer, Emily Gervais.
  • A new Academic Leadership Award was presented to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes. From left: Varsity Leadership Counicl Co-Presidents Andrea Priamo and Mike Shoveller and award winners Shelbie Rayner-Murphy and Lloyd MacPherson.
    A new Academic Leadership Award was presented to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes. From left: Varsity Leadership Counicl Co-Presidents Andrea Priamo and Mike Shoveller and award winners Shelbie Rayner-Murphy and Lloyd MacPherson.
  • A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year, during Wednesday morning's breakfast event at Grant Hall.
    A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year, during Wednesday morning's breakfast event at Grant Hall.

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation honoured the 2016-17 Academic All-Stars at a breakfast reception held Wednesday morning in Grant Hall.

A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year at Queen’s. The breakfast event marks the sixth year Athletics and Recreation has undertaken this initiative to honour the academic and athletic excellence of its student-athletes.

“We are so fortunate to have each and every one of you at Queen’s," Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney said to those in attendance. “Because of your hard work and dedication to both academic and athletic pursuits, we are consistently among the top five schools for the number of Academic All-Stars each year. I believe this reflects our goal of recruiting the very best student-athletes who are performing at the highest level, both in the classroom and on the field of play – and it reflects our commitment to providing you with the encouragement, support and resources that you need to excel.”

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon and Executive Director of Athletics and Recreation Leslie Dal Cin were also on hand to speak to the student-athletes and congratulate them on their success.

The Nixon Academic Leadership Award was given out to the male and female athletes from both the varsity teams and clubs who have exemplified achievement in academics, community service and fair play in their sport. This year's recipients of the Nixon Award are: Erin Lee (Women’s Swimming); Sam Dobbin (Men’s Triathlon); Emily Gervais (Women’s Hockey); and Ejaz Causer (Football). These awards are named in honour of Gord and Janet Nixon, two extraordinary benefactors to Athletics and Recreation.

A new Academic Leadership Award was presented this year to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes who have demonstrated commitment, discipline, resilience, leadership and a positive attitude in combining academic achievement and athletic performance. This year’s recipients were Lloyd MacPherson and Shelbie Rayner-Murphy.

Last week Queen’s Athletics & Recreation announced its student-led Varsity Leadership Council have partnered with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students. The partnership will also see Queen's Gaels Varsity Leadership Council host a group of Pathways students at Queen’s for a day to participate in activities, have lunch, and talk about what university and life as a student-athlete are like.

Approximately 41 per cent of Queen’s student-athletes were named Academic All-Stars this year. The varsity clubs with the highest GPAs were triathlon and track and field, while the women’s and men’s soccer teams recorded the highest team GPAs.

Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette now available

Nov. 21 Gazette
Read the Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette online.

The Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette, the final edition of the fall term, is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus, as well as a number of off-campus locations.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • Photos of Fall Convocation including all four honorary degree recipients and a special article on Bruce Jameson, who received a degree from Queen’s more than 70 years after attending the university.
  • An article highlighting the Learning Outcomes Assessment project and the next steps.
  • An article introducing Vanessa Yzaguire, the Division of Students Affairs’ first diversity and inclusion coordinator .
  • A feature on the unveiling of a Queen’s Remembers plinth in honour of the Fifth Field Company and its members.
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will be published Jan. 9, 2018. However, new articles are posted daily at the Gazette Online.

Follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Pathways partnership connects Gaels with local students

Athletics and Recreation and its student-led Varsity Leadership Council are partnering with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students.
A new partnership between Athletics and Recreation, the Varsity Leadership Council and Pathways to Education will create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students. From left: Allyson Tonelli, Assistant Manager, Marketing, Communications and Events - Queen's Athletics; Roger Romero, Interim Coordinator, Tutoring and Mentoring Programs – Pathways to Education; Andrea Priamo, Varsity Leadership Co-President - Women's Basketball; Leslie Dal Cin, Executive Director, Athletics and Recreation. 

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation and its student-led Varsity Leadership Council are partnering with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students.

“These new initiatives in Athletics and Recreation build on the university’s longstanding outreach activities with local community groups,” says Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney. “We are particularly excited about the engagement of our student-athletes as role models who can help area youth see that post-secondary education is possible.” 

The partnership will see the Varsity Leadership Council host a group of Pathways students at Queen’s for a day to participate in activities, have lunch, and talk about what university and life as a student-athlete are like. Queen’s will also host selected Pathways participants at several home games over the course of the year, and donate gently-used equipment to Pathways each year, allowing more youth the opportunity to be involved in sport and physical activity. In addition, a male and female Pathways student will be recognized with Academic All-Star Awards for success both in the classroom and on the field of play.

“When it comes to the Pathways organization, we share many of the same values around the importance of education, wellness and physical activity as contributors to personal and professional success,” says Leslie Dal Cin, Executive Director, Queen’s Athletics and Recreation. “Not only can our student-athletes act as mentors for these high school students, they can learn from them about goal setting, resilience and overcoming obstacles.”

Pathways to Education is a national organization that aims to break the cycle of poverty through education, and provides the resources and network of support for our students to graduate from high school and build the foundation for a successful future. The Kingston Pathways to Education program is run by Kingston Community Health Centres (KCHC).

“We are thrilled with our partnership with Queen’s Athletics and Recreation. Access to recreation and positive role models are critical to healthy outcomes for our youth,” says Roger Romero, Interim Coordinator, Tutoring and Mentoring Programs, Pathways to Education. “Queen's University is a long-standing academic partner of KCHC Pathways to Education. Many of our students choose Queen's as their post-secondary pathway, and this is a wonderful opportunity for our students to experience everything Queen’s University can offer.”

The Division of Student Affairs has been working with Pathways programs across Ontario for many years, visiting with youth, helping with university applications, offering free transportation to Fall Preview and summer orientation programs, and providing renewable entrance awards for Pathways participants. The university has developed a new first generation admission policy, and hiring is now underway for a new full-time GTA-based recruiter who will focus on students from under-represented populations, including racialized and first generation students. 

For more information about Pathways to Education, visit the website.

 

Queen’s engineering grad named Rhodes Scholar

Iain Sander
Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar. The Chemical Engineering graduate is the 58th Rhodes Scholar from Queen's. (Supplied Image)

Queen’s University graduate Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar.

Mr. Sander, who studied Chemical Engineering at Queen’s, is the university’s 58th Rhodes Scholar and will begin his studies at Oxford University next fall.

The Rhodes Scholarships are considered the oldest and most prestigious international scholarships for outstanding scholars from any academic field of study.

“It is a tremendous honour to have been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar, and I am very grateful to everyone in Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the Queen’s community who has supported me throughout the application process,” says Mr. Sander, who is currently studying medicine at the University of Alberta. “I have been fortunate to learn from world-class professors who have consistently challenged me academically and supported me in pursuit my research interests. Queen’s University will always hold a special place in my heart and I am very grateful for relationships I developed and the intellectual and personal growth I experienced during my undergraduate career.”

Mr. Sander graduated from Queen’s with first class honours in Chemical Engineering earlier this year. He received the Medal in Chemical Engineering and the Society for Chemical Industry Merit Award in recognition of achieving the highest standing in his discipline.

At Oxford, he plans to study orthopaedic biomechanics to help improve the health, lives, and independence of individuals with disabilities.

“On behalf of Queen’s University, I am pleased to congratulate Iain on this tremendous accomplishment and opportunity,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf. “I am confident that at Oxford he will apply the skills and experience he has gained at Queen’s, as well as through his years of leadership and community service, to further his contributions to society. I have no doubt he will thrive as a Rhodes Scholar.”

During his time at Queen’s, Mr. Sander volunteered extensively on campus and in the Kingston community, coaching the local Special Olympics swim team, mentoring first-year engineering design teams as they worked on award-winning adaptive buoyancy devices, and tutoring peers in English.

Mr. Sander, who grew up in Lethbridge, Alta., was a Loran Scholar and a recipient of the Queen’s Chancellor’s Scholarship. As part of the Loran Scholar program he spent his community development summer in France as a live-in assistant with L’Arche, an organization for people with intellectual disabilities.

This is the second straight Rhodes Scholar for Queen’s after Claire Gummo, a Political Studies and Gender Studies student, received the prestigious scholarship in 2017.

Funded by the estate of Cecil J. Rhodes (the Rhodes Trusts), 11 Rhodes Scholars are selected each year from across Canada to outstanding students who demonstrate a strong propensity to emerge as “leaders for the world’s future.”

The scholarships to Oxford University are for postgraduate studies or a second bachelor’s degree and cover tuition and fees and provides a stipend to help cover living expenses for two to three years of study while at Oxford.

Learn more about the 2018 Rhodes Scholars.

A holistic view of wellness

The Innovation and Wellness Centre will unite health and wellness resources under one roof.

Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Students walking into the Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) next fall may find themselves spending a lot of time in the space.

In addition to being a hub for innovation and entrepreneurship resources, and academic labs and classrooms for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the IWC will be a place where students maintain and build upon their positive physical and mental health and wellness.

“Physical and mental well-being are important preconditions for academic success,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean (Student Affairs). “This new facility will provide Queen’s with the flexibility to meet the rising demand across the spectrum of wellness services. Co-locating services that support wellness will emphasize to our students the important relationships that connect mental health, physical well-being, and academic success.”

The creation of the IWC was made possible through $55 million in philanthropic support, including $40 million to revitalize the facility and $15 million specifically earmarked for student wellness and academic programming. In addition, the federal and Ontario governments contributed a combined total of nearly $22 million to this facility.

The IWC will house modernized facilities for Student Wellness Services, configured so that physicians, nurses, and counsellors all share the same space. The main floor will also be home to Queen’s Student Accessibility Services and a new health promotion hub.

“Our hope is that the revitalized, more central location of our services will better engage students in health-promoting activities,” says Jennifer Dods, Executive Director, Student Wellness Services. “The biggest change for us will be a greater integration of our services, which will be noticeable from the moment you walk in the door. Our new space in the IWC will feature one shared reception for our services, which will mean one point of entry and less stigma for students accessing counselling, health, or accessibility supports.”

The IWC will also include an expanded interfaith chaplaincy, the Queen’s University International Centre, refreshed athletics training space including the three existing gyms, the Student Community Relations office, and a new Examination Centre to support faculties and schools. University Registrar John Metcalfe notes the number of accommodated exams and midterms continues to rise each year.

“As we prepare for the move to the new centre, we are taking the opportunity to refresh our business processes, moving away from paper forms in favour of an online system,” says Dr. Metcalfe. “Between these changes, and the co-location of the Examination Centre with other wellness services, the process of securing an accommodation for an exam will be much less stressful for all involved. The intent is to create clarity on where to go, and offer a streamlined process for accommodations for both graduate and undergraduate students.”

The Examination Centre will include 70 private and semi-private rooms with adjustable desks; some will offer computers and specialized software. There will be no carpeting or fluorescent lighting, meaning students with light sensitivities or allergies can write without distraction, and some private rooms will be soundproofed for those who need to speak while writing.

The Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) is also looking ahead to the move. The QUIC team, currently located in the John Deutsch University Centre, has a front row seat during the ongoing construction. While there have been some noise issues, Director Jyoti Kotecha (MPA'03) says it will all be worth it once the team is in the new space, which features a larger kitchen and adds some meeting rooms.

“Our new space and its proximity to other Student Affairs services will make it easier to work collaboratively with partners such as the Peer Health Educators and the Chaplaincy,” says Ms. Kotecha. “Though the space is comparable in size, it is better laid out and offers us some room to grow, in alignment with the growth of international enrolment at Queen’s.”

Another group making the big move next door will be the Office of the Interfaith Chaplaincy. Chaplain Kate Johnson says the new space includes a dedicated quiet room for prayer or meditation, a lounge area, and an additional office which will be shared by the office’s three part-time chaplains.

“This additional room will offer us more flexibility and, coupled with the new staff, should allow us to expand popular programs like our “Cooking with Grans” offering,” says Ms. Johnson. “Moving the Chaplaincy into the Innovation and Wellness Centre will also reunite us with more Student Wellness services, better serving students in the process.”

The Innovation and Wellness Centre’s grand opening is planned for fall 2018. 

Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

 

Giving back to the Queen’s and Kingston communities

Kellie Hart and James Ligthart are the co-chairs of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee. This year the committee has a goal of raising $320,000 for the United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.
Kellie Hart and James Ligthart are the co-chairs of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee. This year the committee has a goal of raising $320,000 for the United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington. (University Communications)

Organizing the annual fundraising campaign for the United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington requires a team effort, with hundreds of volunteers and staff members taking part.

At Queen’s, the largest workplace campaign for the United Way KFLA, the effort is led by a cross-campus committee comprising representatives from all aspects of the university, from administration and staff to faculty, retirees and students.

This year the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000, accounting for close to 10 per cent of the United Way KFL&A’s budget.

Leading the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee are co-chairs Kellie Hart and James Ligthart. 

For both, their support of the United Way started before they arrived at Queen’s, and once they joined the university it was an easy decision to get involved.

Through her participation in the campaign committee, Ms. Hart says she realized that she can make a difference at Queen’s and within the larger community.

“Giving to your community is important for me because you get so much more back,” Ms. Hart says. “I took part in the Seeing is Believing Tour and that really opens your eyes to the extent of services that the United Way helps to fund and how important those services are to the community.”

As a major employer in Kingston, Queen’s can contribute so much to the community that houses it and is home to its employees and students, she adds.

Along with his Queen’s committee work, Mr. Ligthart has participated in the United Way KFLA Next Gen, which brings together volunteers ages 25 to 40 who are interested in becoming future leaders.

“For me, volunteering for the United Way is a way to support an organization that gives opportunity to people in our community who may otherwise not have it, helping them take the next step forward that they can turn into an opportunity for something else and grow from that,” he says.

At Queen’s he has found that the campaign draws strength by reaching across campus and inviting a diversity of ideas and contributions. It all adds up to a greater positive impact.

“We are very fortunate to have a large workforce but within that it allows for a lot of different-minded people to come to the table with the campaign committee, from different departments, different faculties, to come together with one goal in mind but have lots of different avenues towards getting the campaign exposure and helping reaching into different areas of our large campus,” Mr. Ligthart says.

During their time as committee members, and now co-chairs, both have found that along with the positives of helping others, they have also benefitted by meeting and working with their colleagues from across the Queen’s community.

“We have a great team to work with and it is very motivating when you have a group of people who are committed and want to make a difference along with you,” Ms. Hart says. “Just knowing the good things that Queen’s can do for the community and knowing that you are part of that and that you can make that happen is very rewarding.”

The fundraising campaign is currently underway and helps the United Way support community agencies. Last year, more than 55,000 people benefited from United Way KFL&A-funded programs.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

A view from the bench

  • Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, the first female and longest-serving chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, answered questions from Bill Flanagan, Dean, Faculty of Law, during Monday's Principal's Forum.
    Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, the first female and longest-serving chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, answered questions from Bill Flanagan, Dean, Faculty of Law, during Monday's Principal's Forum.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf, left, introduces Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, at the beginning of Monday's Principal's Forum in Wallace Hall.
    Principal Daniel Woolf, left, introduces Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, at the beginning of Monday's Principal's Forum in Wallace Hall.
  • Wallace Hall was packed with students and faculty members on Monday for the Principal's Forum featuring Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, who will be stepping down from the bench on Dec. 15.
    Wallace Hall was packed with students and faculty members on Monday for the Principal's Forum featuring Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, who will be stepping down from the bench on Dec. 15.
  • Wallace Hall was packed with students and faculty members for Monday's Principal's Forum featuring Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, who will be stepping down from the bench on Dec. 15.
    Wallace Hall was packed with students and faculty members for Monday's Principal's Forum featuring Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, who will be stepping down from the bench on Dec. 15.

Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, the first female and longest-serving chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, spoke to a packed Wallace Hall at Monday’s Principal’s Forum public lecture.

Chief Justice McLachlin – who will be stepping down from the bench on Dec. 15 – answered a series of questions from Bill Flanagan, Dean of the Faculty of Law, touching upon her career and looking ahead for justice in Canada.

The Principal’s Forum is a public lecture series that enables the principal to invite distinguished visitors to campus to speak on issues of interest to the Queen’s community.

Pascal picks up third shutout of the season

"Goalie Stephanie Pascal earned her third shutout of the season as the Queen's Gaels beat the UOIT Ridgebacks 2-0 on Saturday."
Goalie Stephanie Pascal earned her third shutout of the season as the Queen's Gaels beat the UOIT Ridgebacks 2-0 on Saturday. (Photo by Jason Scourse)

A quick roundup of Gaels teams and athletes in action over the weekend:

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The No. 10 Queen’s Gaels (8-2-0-1) picked up a 2-0 victory over the UOIT Ridgebacks (2-2-5-1) on Saturday night at the Memorial Centre. Hailey Wilson scored the game-winning goal in the second period with her third of the season, while Addi Halladay added an empty-netter to seal the win for the Gaels.

Goalie Stephanie Pascal made 18 saves for her third shutout of the season .

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen’s Gaels (6-3-3) used some overtime magic to beat the Nipissing Lakers (4-5-3) 4-3 on Saturday night. Darcy Greenaway netted the overtime winner 50 seconds into the extra frame

Also scoring for the Gaels were Luke Edwards, Duncan Campbell, and Ben Fanjoy. Goalie Jacob Brennan picked up the win, making 29 saves.

On Friday, the Gaels beat the Laurentian Voyageurs (2-9-0) 8-2 in Sudbury. Ryan Bloom led the way for Queen’s with four points – a goal and three assists – while Slater Doggett added two goals and an assist. Darcy Greenaway had two goals and singles went to Damian Bourne, Patrick Sanvido and Shawn Boudreau.

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (4-1) beat crosstown rivals the RMC Paladins (1-5) in four sets, 18-25, 25-19, 25-19, 25-19, on Saturday.

After the Paladins took the opening set the Gaels roared back for the win. Markus Trence finished with 14 kills and two aces, while Mitchell Neuert added 12 kills and an ace. Zane Grossinger had 33 assists. 

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (5-1) women’s volleyball team swept the Lakehead Thunderwolves (3-4) in straight sets 26-24, 25-20, 25-18 in Thunder Bay on Saturday.

Isabelle Korchinski led a well-rounded attack with nine kills and Julia Wiercigroch added eight more. Sierra Hardy finished the match with 27 assists and three aces.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The No. 10 Queen’s Gaels (5-1) dropped their first game of the season, on the road against the Laurier Golden Hawks (4-3) 72-70 on Saturday night.

After closing the gap to two points with a minute to go, the Gaels had their chances but couldn’t find the winning basket.

Veronika Lavergne finished with 16 points and Abby Dixon added 15 points of her own.

On Friday, the Gaels romped past the Waterloo Warriors (0-6) 53-35, utilizing a stingy defence to take the win.

Lavergne led the way with 17 points along with seven rebounds, all on offence. Andrea Priamo finished with four of the team’s 17 steals.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (4-2) defeated the Laurier Golden Hawks (3-4) in a tightly contested matchup 77-76 on Saturday in Waterloo. 

Tanner Graham nailed a late threepointer to seal the win and finished with a double-double on 16 points and 11 rebounds, while Quinton Gray added 13 points to go along with seven assists.

On Friday, the Gaels lost 87-75 decision on the road to Waterloo (1-5). Jaz Bains scored 22 points and Tanner Graham contributed 17.

Orientation sessions for new managers launched

  • Attendees of the New Managers Orientation work together on a project during the event held Tuesday, Nov. 21 at the University Club.
    Attendees of the New Managers Orientation work together on a project during the event held Tuesday, Nov. 21 at the University Club.
  • Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration), makes a presentation during the first session of the New Managers Orientation at the University Club.
    Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration), makes a presentation during the first session of the New Managers Orientation at the University Club.
  • Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon speaks to the group of 50 attendees at the New Managers Orientation, hosted by Human Resources.
    Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon speaks to the group of 50 attendees at the New Managers Orientation, hosted by Human Resources.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf was one of several gust speakers at the first session of the New Managers Orientation on Tuesday, Nov.21.
    Principal Daniel Woolf was one of several gust speakers at the first session of the New Managers Orientation on Tuesday, Nov.21.

For anyone new to Queen’s, an orientation session is always helpful for getting to know the university, from its history and structure to resources, policies, and much more.

Students have Orientation Week, newly-arriving faculty have a day to make connections at Queen’s, while new staff spend their first half-day with Human Resources. 

Now, Human Resources has developed and is facilitating a two-day New Manager’s Orientation for managers in their role less than two years, or managers who are new to Queen’s. 

Being held Tuesday, Nov. 21 and Tuesday, Nov. 28, the orientation sessions are also an opportunity for networking with fellow managers who they can reconnect with moving forward. Also, participants will receive resource binders with all the necessary contacts and materials to lead successfully and efficiently. 

“We’re excited to introduce our latest talent management initiative, New Manager Orientation,” says Marie Doherty, Director of Client Services and Organizational Development and Learning. “The purpose of the two-day event is to provide our managers with information and resources that are available to them to assist them in leading others and succeeding in their new role.”

Day 1 provides an overview of Queen’s, its culture, the governing bodies and structures that have been installed to assist managers with operations, such as the Strategic Framework, the Comprehensive International Plan, the Academic Plan, and to hear from senior leaders such as Principal Daniel Woolf, and Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon. 

Day 2 takes a more hands-on approach to management by giving participants the tools and resources to manage their day-to-day activities.  Participants will also hear from university departments such as Employee and Labour Relations, Finance, Privacy Office, and more. 

The orientation sessions are being held at the University Club in the George Teves Dining Room, and will run from 8:30 am to 4 pm, with doors opening at 8 am for breakfast and networking.  Lunch is provided for both days.

For more information or to register contact Don Ames, Organizational Development Consultant, Human Resources,at don.ames@queensu.ca or ext. 79002.

Serving up social innovation

  • Principal Daniel Woolf welcomes members of the Kingston and Queen's communities to the Principal's Community Breakfast at the Residence Inn by Marriott Kingston’s Water’s Edge.
    Principal Daniel Woolf welcomes members of the Kingston and Queen's communities to the Principal's Community Breakfast at the Residence Inn by Marriott Kingston’s Water’s Edge.
  • A panel provided update on social innovation projects at Queen's. From left: Principal Daniel Woolf; Tina Dacin, Director of the Smith School of Business Centre for Social Impact, Shyra Barberstock, a PhD candidate and CEO and President of Okwaho Equal Source, Claire Davies, a professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and Hasan Kettaneh, a PhD candidate and member of the PhD Community Initiative program.
    A panel provided update on social innovation projects at Queen's. From left: Principal Daniel Woolf; Tina Dacin, Director of the Smith School of Business Centre for Social Impact, Shyra Barberstock, a PhD candidate and CEO and President of Okwaho Equal Source, Claire Davies, a professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and Hasan Kettaneh, a PhD candidate and member of the PhD Community Initiative program.
  • One of the nearly 100 attendees of the Principal's Community Breakfast asks a question during the event hosted at the Residence Inn by Marriott Kingston’s Water’s Edge on Friday, Nov. 17.
    One of the nearly 100 attendees of the Principal's Community Breakfast asks a question during the event hosted at the Residence Inn by Marriott Kingston’s Water’s Edge on Friday, Nov. 17.

The annual Principal’s Community Breakfast was hosted Friday, Nov. 17 at the Residence Inn by Marriott Kingston’s Water’s Edge, with close to 100 people from the Kingston and Queen’s communities attending.

Principal Daniel Woolf provided a number of updates on initiatives at the university while a panel, comprising Tina Dacin, Director of the Smith School of Business Centre for Social Impact, Shyra Barberstock, a PhD candidate and CEO and President of Okwaho Equal Source, Claire Davies, a professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and Hasan Kettaneh, a PhD candidate and member of the PhD Community Initiative program, discussed their efforts in social innovation.

The event wrapped up with a question-and-answer period.

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