Queen's University

CRTC internet usage

2011-02-10

Queen’s University Electrical and Computer Engineering professor Shahram Yousefi is available to talk about the growing congestion problem at the heart of the CRTC’s ruling on charges related to bandwidth usage and some alternative solutions that would help protect consumers and smaller businesses.

“SISCO has predicted that in the next four years, the annual global IP traffic on the networks will exceed 3/4th of a zettabyte, which is huge!” says Dr. Yousefi. “The telecom systems in operation today aren’t capable of handling that much data transfer, so standards bodies and the government are going to have to find ways of handling that before information grids get too congested. This congestion would mean long delays, low quality signals, and much frustration for users and providers alike. The CRTC ruling could potentially put money back into the pockets of the infrastructure providers. If channeled towards research and development, this extra revenue could be beneficial for all in the long run. However, the CRTC’s decision seems to be a rather draconian one that will hurt consumers and smaller businesses immediately.”

Dr. Yousefi’s research is focused on designing high-output telecom systems that are faster but use less power and less bandwidth, an area of research in which Canada is a leader.

To arrange an interview, please contact Christina Archibald at christina.archibald@queensu.ca, 613.533.2877 or Michael Onesi at michael.onesi@queensu.ca, 613.533.6000 ext. 77513, Queen’s News and Media Services.

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