Queen's University

Queen's research teams awarded NSERC grants

 
2012-02-24

Queen’s professors have recently received grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to help advance their research over the next 10 years. The funding focuses on areas that could influence Canada’s economy, society or environment.

Highlights of the Queen’s projects include:

Saeed Gazor, Steve Blostein and Il-Min Kim (Electrical and Computer Engineering)

Saeed Gazor, Steve Blostein, and Il-Min Kim, have received $504,000 to help them develop smart technologies in wireless spectrum management. Their research focuses on technologies that can scan for the availability of and then use, signal-free channels without interrupting services to licensed users.  Smart bandwidth management methods and policy guidelines represent a potential billion dollar market.

"It is tremendously exciting and rewarding to receive this funding,” says Dr. Gazor. “This support will enable us to remain on the cutting edge of global research in this field.”

James Fraser (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy)

James Fraser and his team have improved the precision of laser devices. They have achieved automatic laser processing using an imaging technique that can see through the smoke and sparks to directly measure cut depth on-the-fly, making the process fully automatic.   This will improve quality, reduce costs, and perhaps open up new manufacturing possibilities.  His project has received $435,533, the majority to be used for student and research and staff support that will allow his team to explore the implications their discovery in a variety of fields. Both undergraduate and graduate students will receive training at the intersection of advanced manufacturing and photonics and directly contribute to both.

"This grant provides important multiyear funding which enables us to join forces with an international team of experts to exploit our new technology to solve a variety of scientific and industrially relevant problems,” says Dr. Fraser.

Patrick Martin (School of Computing)

Patrick Martin and his team of Hossam Hassanein ) School of Computing), Mohammad Zulkernine (School of Computing) and Kathryn Brohman (School of Business)  has received $480,000 to develop new research into the integration of two emerging technologies: cloud computing and mobile communication networks. As more of the services we use in our daily lives are offered through the Web, consumers' expectations continue to grow. The next generation of services will be "elastic" in the sense that they will automatically grow and shrink in response to user demand and will be accessible anywhere, anytime from mobile devices.

“The funding facilitates new collaborations among researchers at Queen's and training for our students  in an exciting new area that would not otherwise be available,” says Dr. Martin.

 

Suning Wang (Chemistry)

Suning Wang has received $462,000 to further her research into the development of devices that are expected to gradually replace currently used lighting technologies. Dr. Wang will further her research on blue phosphorescent compounds for high efficiency organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). These could be used in light bulbs that would consume less energy than incandescent light bulbs without the need for the toxic metals in fluorescent light bulbs. Professor Z. H. Lu’s team in the department of Materials science and engineering,  University of Toronto, is a collaborator of this research project.

“The current key challenges for OLEDs are a lack of efficient and long lasting blue emitters,” says Dr. Wang. “This strategic grant will allow us to fully explore the various strategies in achieving stable and efficient blue phosphorescent materials for OLEDs and strengthen our collaborative research efforts with researchers at Queen’s and the University of Toronto.”

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