Queen's University

Queen's students win international game-theory tournament

 
2009-03-26

Two Queen's PhD students are headed to St. Andrews University in Scotland, having won an international computer tournament. Daniel Cownden (Mathematics and Statistics) and Timothy Lillicrap (Neuroscience) submitted the winning program in the Social Learning Strategies Tournament, an international game-theory competition.

Two Queen's PhD students are headed to St. Andrews University in Scotland, having won an international computer tournament. Daniel Cownden (Mathematics and Statistics) and Timothy Lillicrap (Neuroscience) submitted the winning program in the Social Learning Strategies Tournament, an international game-theory competition.

The winners will travel to St. Andrews in early April to receive their prize of 10,000 Euros and to take part in an international conference where the results of the competition will be analyzed.

Contestants were given one year to come up with a programmed strategy to survive in an unfamiliar environment.

The tournament is overseen by a committee of researchers from universities around the world. It received 104 entries from teams from 16 countries covering a diverse range of disciplines, including biology, physics, management, psychology, anthropology, ethology, environmental science, primatology, sociology, mathematics, computer science, philosophy and engineering.

Mr. Cownden studies the theory of games, particularly those involving evolution and learning, and Mr. Lillicrap is interested in understanding the brain using the mathematical theory of optimal control.

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