DEPARTMENT OF

Geological Sciences and

Geological Engineering

site header

Laboratory Personnel


Dr. Kurt Kyser

kyser@geol.queensu.ca
Dr. Kurt Kyser established the Stable Isotope lab at Queen's University in 1997 and the ICPMS lab three years later. His research interests include isotope geochemistry, origin and chemical evolution of the earth, mass spectroscopy, evolution of fluids in basins, low-temperature geochemistry, geochronology, environmental geochemistry, and fluid-rock interactions.
 

 

Dr. Dan Layton-Matthews

dlayton@geol.queensu.ca
Dr. Dan Layton-Matthews joined Queen's University as an assistant professor in 2006. His research interests have focused on processes controlling the distribution of trace elements within sedimentary and volcanic-hosted ore deposits in seafloor and terrestrial environments. His current research involves concomitant physical and chemical imaging, isotopic compositions and mineralogical sites of ore forming elements within source and trapping regions. His research is focused on the subtle differentiation of mineral-bound, mineral adsorption and organic-bound processes that lead to the formation, transport and deposition of ore fluids, and the subsequent chemical and mechanical migration of elements from these deposits.
 

 

 

Dr. Don Chipley

Dr. Don Chipley received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Saskatchewan in 1995, specializing in isotope geochemistry, and is now responsible for the operation and maintenance of the two Element HR-ICP-MS, Neptune multicollector ICP-MS and the Clean Laboratory for sample preparation. He is involved in developing both preparation and analytical techniques for solution and laser ablation analysis. He also instructs instrument users in sample preparation techniques and instrument operation. Don's principal research interests are in fluid history of sedimentary basins and paleoclimatic determinations using speleothems.
 

Dr. Paul Alexandre

Paul Alexandre obtained his Ph.D. degree in Nancy, France. He worked on the tectonic evolution of the European Variscan Belt (in Limousin and the Pyrenees) using U-Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology and thermochronology.

As a postdoctoral fellow at the Queen's Facility for Isotope Research, Paul is involved in understanding the formation of uranium deposits using petrography, mineral and rock chemistry, stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry, and geochronology. The emphasis is on understanding the fluid history of the basin and the deposits in order to propose novel exploration guides.

Paul is involved in innovative collaborative research in U-Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology and mineralogy.

Paul teaches Isotopes in the Environment, Geochemical Exploration, and Geostatistics at Queen's.

April Vuletich

Before joining Queen's in 1999, April worked for Mobil, Dallas as an essential analyst for all isotopic work in the Geochemistry Labs, where she established the Compound Specific Isotopic Analysis (CSIA) of hydrocarbons. A graduate of Metropolitan State College and the University of Colorado, April worked for the USGS from 1975 to 1988 then managed the Radiogenic Isotope Lab at the University of Saskatchewan through 1994. Her research activities involve the design and implementation of a GC/C/IRMS interface for novel applications in the characterization of geologic material. April is recognized as an expert in isotopic analysis and is routinely consulted by industry, academic, and government agencies, including the International Olympic drug-testing labs, U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) and the U.S. ATF (Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms).
 

Christabel Jean

Christabel received her B.Sc. (Honours) in the Geological Sciences program at Queen’s University in 2012 and her M.Sc. in 2013, also at Queen’s.  Her M.Sc. thesis focused on the use of extreme environment brachiopods as environmental proxies.  She is currently a Research Associate at the Queens Facility for Isotope Research, where her research interests include stable isotope geochemistry, oceanography and carbonate geochemistry. 

 

 

Brian Joy

Brian is responsible for operating and maintaining the department's JEOL JXA-8230 electron microprobe, which was installed during Spring, 2011. Brian received his B.Sc. in Geology from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and his M.Sc. in Geology from the University of California Davis. His interests include mineralogy and metamorphic petrology and, in particular, metamorphism of banded iron-formation.
 

Evelyne Leduc

Evelyne received her H.B.Sc. in Geology at Queen's University in 2008 and her M.Sc. in 2010, also at Queen's. Her thesis focused on the mineralogy, geochemistry, and stability of Na-Mg sulfates. She is currently a Research Associate at the Queens Facility for Isotope Research, with research interests in exploration geochemistry, ICP-MS instrumentation, and mineralogy.