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Mean green protein

 'Team Duckweed' features, from left, Alex Stothart, Hana Chaudhury, Gilad Streiner, Santiago Spencer, and Rachel Amirault. These five Queen's students are participating in the Queen's Innovation Connector Summer Initiative, which is helping to kickstart their business. (Supplied Photo)

It’s full of protein and fibre. It’s a leafy green, and a rich source of Vitamin A and B. It’s a hearty plant – you could even say it grows like a weed.

The one remaining question on the mind of Queen’s students Hana Chaudhury (Comm’18), Rachel Amirault (Sc’18), Gilad Streiner (Artsci’17, Sc’17), Alex Stothart (Sc’18), and Santi Spencer (Sc’18) is: would you like to try some duckweed?

“We initially came across duckweed as a commercial opportunity from [an industry trend report] that highlighted alternative, plant-based protein sources,” explains Hana. “After conducting research, we were surprised – and delighted – to find that duckweed as food is a largely untapped market in North America. We saw it as both a great market opportunity, and as a chance to provide a much more sustainable protein alternative with little sacrifice on nutrition and a lower environmental footprint than most plant-based protein alternatives.”

The members of ‘Team Duckweed’ are currently participating in the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI), a summer-long bootcamp for budding entrepreneurs. They are using the time, and the feedback of QICSI mentors, to validate their market, conduct tests, research their product, and design the system that will eventually help them grow their crop. Hana and the team are grateful for the opportunity they have had through the QICSI program to learn these lessons and develop their business in a safe environment.

A successful expedition to gather duckweed. The next place you see it may be a store shelf near you. (Supplied Photo).

“It’s an unparalleled opportunity for young people interested in entrepreneurship,” says Hana. “We have loved having the feedback from mentors who have worked in this field and have a wealth of knowledge to provide us with, as well as the quality of the speakers and entrepreneurship education the program has provided. We quickly built a strong community with the rest of our cohort, and seeing everyone’s hard work definitely fuels the competitive fire and has pushed us to work harder.”

But, of course, before their business gets off the ground there’s that million dollar question: how does it taste?

“We have tried duckweed in small quantities and, to us, it tasted like nothing,” adds Hana. “Granted, when we taste it in larger quantities we will probably get a better sense of its taste profile. We initially began with the idea of developing a taste neutral nutritional powder that could be added to any meal in small quantities. We are exploring some other options such as incorporating it into a sauce, breads, or another food product, but are still in the process of researching what end-product consumers will gravitate towards most.”

QICSI runs until mid-August, and ‘Team Duckweed’ is one of eight teams participating in this year’s bootcamp. Learn more about QICSI at queensu.ca/innovationcentre

The next superfood? A photo of duckweed harvested by 'Team Duckweed'. (Supplied Photo)

 

Last chance to see New Eyes on the Universe exhibit

The New Eyes on the Universe exhibit – featuring the groundbreaking work of Queen's Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Art McDonald, and his team at SNOLAB – will be on view at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre for one more week, until July 9.

The interactive exhibit highlights the discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) project. Dr. McDonald shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics for this experiment, which proved that solar neutrinos change their flavour en route to Earth, an important discovery for explaining the nature of matter and the structure of the universe.

Created by SNOLAB with Science North, this touring installation in the Agnes atrium features a special component for the Queen's setting: a real-time cloud chamber that makes visible some of the subatomic particles that continually bombard us.

Admission is free. More information available in the Gazette or on the Agnes website.

Blazing a trail in Aboriginal studies

When it comes to courses in Aboriginal studies at Queen’s University, many of the paths, both past and present, lead to Bob Lovelace (Global Development Studies).

The originator of on-campus, blended and online courses, as well as playing an advisory role in the creation of the new Indigenous Studies Minor, Mr. Lovelace is the founding manager for the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre and, with others, an initiator of the Annual Aboriginal Studies Symposium at Queen’s.

[Bob Lovelace]
Bob Lovelace (Global Development Studies) is the 2016 recipient of the Educational Leadership Award, one of six Principal's Teaching and Learning Awards. (Supplied Photo) 

For playing a leading role in teaching, mentoring, and building the profile of Indigenous issues for more than 20 years, Mr. Lovelace received the 2016 Educational Leadership Award, one of the six Principal’s Teaching and Learning Awards.

In receiving feedback from students for the course he teaches, Mr. Lovelace finds it encouraging to hear that they have not only gained more knowledge about Aboriginal history and culture but about themselves as well.

“The best thing that I hear is that when students take an Aboriginal studies course they are really challenged because this is not like most courses,” he says. “With Aboriginal studies there are a lot of preconceived notions about Aboriginal people. There are a lot of stereotypes about Aboriginal people and their circumstances, and a lot of that is challenged for students. So the best thing that I hear when students take one of these courses is they say ‘You know, I learned a lot about Aboriginal people that I didn’t know, but I also learned a lot about myself and because of that I am actually a better Canadian.’”

During his time at Queen’s, Mr. Lovelace has developed two on-campus courses – Introduction to Aboriginal Studies (DEVS 220) and Topics in Aboriginal Studies (DEVS 221) –  as well as Re-Indigenization of People and Environments (DEVS 480), a highly-innovative experiential course that blends online learning, in-class preparation and land-based pedagogy, involving two weeks of living on the land.

DEVS 220 and DEVS 221 are also required elements for the Indigenous Studies Minor. The commitment and interest he has witnessed in the students taking the minor are encouraging, Mr. Lovelace adds.

“I work with a lot of the students involved in taking the minor and it is something that they really wanted, not just because it’s going to get them ahead in the world but because it says something about their character, says something about their ability to try to understand the world they live in better,” he says. “They’re really diligent and I guess that’s the thing that really impressed me, that the students who take the minor and the courses are really diligent about getting what they can out of it.”

The Principal’s Teaching and Learning Awards, created in 2015, recognize individuals and teams who have shown exceptional innovation and leadership in teaching and learning on campus. The awards are administered by the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

The Educational Leadership Award acknowledges and celebrates exemplary educational leadership of a faculty member, staff member or student, demonstrated through initiatives that have a significant and positive impact on teaching and learning at a departmental, faculty, student and/or institutional level.

Nominations for the 2017 award are currently being accepted. All nominations should be sent electronically in PDF form to ctl@queensu.ca no later than Tuesday, Aug. 1, by 4 pm. For more information about the award and the nomination form and process, visit the CTL website.

Two 2017 Queen’s National Scholars announced

Queen's University’s Faculty of Arts and Science will gain two prominent new academics following successful applications to the Queen’s National Scholar (QNS) program.

“The QNS program is designed to enrich teaching and research, especially in newly developing fields of knowledge, and is an important initiative supporting our faculty renewal efforts,” says Benoit-Antoine Bacon, Provost and Vice Principal (Academic). “The Principal and I extend our warmest welcome and congratulations to both Dr. Isabelle St-Amand and Dr. Michael Doxtater, our newest Queen’s National Scholars. Both will contribute significantly to our scholarship in the areas of Indigenous studies and culture, a growing need strongly identified in our Truth and Reconciliation Commission report.”

Isabelle St-Amand is one of two new Queen's National Scholars. She will be joining the French Studies and the Languages, Literatures and Cultures​ departments.

Dr. St-Amand received her PhD in 2012 from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her thesis investigated the Oka Crisis through the study of lndigenous and non-Indigenous documentary films and narratives, and was published in 2015. She has worked with the leading scholars in migrant literatures on an anthology of critical texts, and a special journal issue on environmental ethics and activism in Indigenous film and literature. Dr. St-Amand has a proven record of working collaboratively with Indigenous organizations to develop her research.

As a QNS in Aboriginal and Migrant Literatures, Dr. St-Amand will fill a critical need in the departments of French Studies and Languages, Literatures and Cultures to enhance the scholarship of Aboriginal Francophone Literature, and will provide a strong link to Aboriginal Anglophone Literature. She brings with her an impressive teaching dossier that includes teaching at three universities, and will contribute significantly to the new graduate program in Transcultural & Linguistics Studies. Dr. St-Amand will start at Queen's in July.

“I am excited about the research and teaching opportunities that are opening for me at Queen’s,” says Dr. St-Amand. “This opportunity aligns perfectly with my area of research, so I could not have dreamed of a better place for continuing my work.”

“On a personal level, I am looking forward to exploring the city of Kingston and the surrounding environment,” she adds. “I love the way the water is present all around the city. I hope to find opportunities to swim, do outdoor activities in the region, and try the beautiful night skating rink at the city hall in the winter.”

Michael Doxtater is one of two new Queen's National Scholars. He will be joining the Languages, Literatures and Cultures and Global Development Studies departments.

Dr. Doxtater is an award-winning documentarian and scholar of international stature. A member of the Haudenosaunee Nation, and fluent in Kanyen'keha (Mohawk), Dr. Doxtater has both a deeply-rooted understanding of traditional oral knowledge and a clearly articulated vision for the future of lndigenous Studies at Queen's. Involved in grassroots organizing around environmental protection, he is highly regarded as an art practitioner, community activist, educator, strategic planner, and administrator. He possesses extensive professional and scholarly experience in addition to his status as a healer and mediator within his own communities. He will be joining the Languages, Literatures and Cultures and the Global Development Studies departments in July.

The university's reputation is part of what attracted Dr. Doxtater to Queen’s.

“When I opened the email and saw it was a posting at Queen's University...It's one of those universities that has a certain place in the higher learning sphere. It is a first-class university,” he says.

His ambition is to develop a Centre of Excellence Dedicated to Aboriginal Recovery (CEDAR) that would place Queen's at the forefront in the growing field of applied, land-based pedagogies.

“Having Queen's be the platform for this initiative makes sense because of the pilot project’s orientation, which is working with the Iroquois community,” he adds. “With their traditional territory stretching from the Montréal area to the Six Nations territory in southern Ontario, we are geographically in the middle.”

In his free time, Dr. Doxtater stays in shape through visits to the gym, daily runs, and Wasáse – a type of tai chi based on Native dance forms. He is working on selling a screenplay he wrote, and plays guitar.

The QNS program was established in 1985. Since then, more than 100 QNS appointments have been made in a wide variety of disciplines, and the appellation of Queen’s National Scholar has become synonymous with academic excellence.

To learn more about the program, click here.

Three students earn DAAD scholarships

For Parisa Abedi Khoozani (MSc’13), by receiving a scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) she will be able to collaborate directly with her project partners at the University of Giessen while also gaining the opportunity to experience a new set of ideas and viewpoints.

[Parisa Abedy Khoozani]
Parisa Abedi Khoozani, a PhD student in the Centre for Neuroscience Studies, is one of three award applicants from Queen’s to receive a scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). (Supplied Photo)

Ms. Abedi Khoozani, a PhD student in the Centre for Neuroscience Studies is one of three award applicants from Queen’s to earn a prestigious study scholarship along with Soren Mellerup, a PhD student in the Department of Chemistry, and Julia Kostin (Artsci’15), who applied after completing her undergraduate degree and is currently pursuing her master’s in sustainable development at Leipzig University.

“Having this level of success, with three Queen’s applicants receiving DAAD scholarships in one year – it’s fantastic, and reflects the excellent caliber of our students,” says Brenda Brouwer, Vice-Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies. “The competition is open to U.S. and Canadian citizens or permanent residents; in other words there’s a lot of competition. A successful applicant demonstrates not only academic excellence, but also leadership potential and a strong plan of study while in Germany. We’re thrilled with the outcome – it’s quite an achievement for these students and for Queen’s.” 

Through the 10-month scholarship Ms. Abedi Khoozani says she will be able to expand and strengthen her collaboration by being able to stay in Germany longer.

Her current research explores how the human brain combines information coming from different sources and how noise can affect this combination process. To expand her understanding, she is aiming to study the effect of noise during obstacle avoidance.

“For me I feel it’s a great opportunity to get more multidisciplinary ideas or different ways of looking at the data, as well as how to interpret it, how to make sense of the underlying mechanisms in the brain,” she says, adding that she will have access to leading researchers as well as various technologies that will allow her to do more advanced modelling. “Honestly, I am very excited because I have an opportunity that I have dreamed about, to have a chance to visit the university, further my research and collaborate with people.”

DAAD is a publicly funded independent organization of higher education institutions in Germany, offering research grants and study scholarships for students with at least a bachelor’s degree to either study or further their research in Germany.

Shining a light on a piece of Queen’s history

  • Principal Daniel Woolf stands alongside Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack after unveiling a new plaque on the statue of Venus that was brought into the University Club 38 years ago by their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
    Principal Daniel Woolf stands alongside Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack after unveiling a new plaque on the statue of Venus that was brought into the University Club 38 years ago by their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
  • Mati Bernabei speaks at a special event honouring her father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, hosted at the University Club.
    Mati Bernabei speaks at a special event honouring her father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, hosted at the University Club.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack during a special event honouring their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, who once taught the principal at Queen's.
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack during a special event honouring their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, who once taught the principal at Queen's.
  • Barbara Reeves (Classics) points out some details in a poster highlighting the replicas within the Department of Classics to two attendees of an event honouring former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
    Barbara Reeves (Classics) points out some details in a poster highlighting the replicas within the Department of Classics to two attendees of an event honouring former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.

The history of Queen’s is long and colourful and because of this, unfortunately, some of the personalities that are part of that 175-year story have been forgotten.

Recently, the Department of Classics and the University Club honoured a past professor and shone a light on one of his contributions during his time at Queen’s with a special event hosted by the University Club.

[Queen's 175]Richard Bernabei was a Classics professor at Queen’s from 1965-78, and during that time he had an impact on many of his colleagues, as well as students, including current Principal Daniel Woolf, who spoke at the event.

Organized by Barbara Reeves (Classics), an associate professor and coordinator of Queen’s Classics at 175, the event was aimed at remembering Dr. Bernabei’s contributions inside and outside the lecture hall, including a Venus de Milo statue that he “smuggled” into the University Club in 1979 that has become a fixture of the building.

At the event a plaque was unveiled for the statue.  

“Dr. Bernabei impacted a lot of students, including Principal Woolf. He donated this statue which has been admired for the past 38 years by people at the University Club, not necessarily knowing about him but they have benefitted from it, and yet we don’t know him,” Dr. Reeves says, adding that she felt it was important to provide some recognition.

The event attracted a wide range of Queen’s community members including former colleagues, friends and Dr. Bernabei’s daughters – Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack.

“There were people from all across campus, and that was wonderful,” Dr. Reeves says. “It was not a departmental function. There were people from everywhere who were interested in the statue, who were interested in Queen’s history.”

The wording on the plaque matches a request written in a letter 25 years ago by Dr. Bernabei’s ex-wife Wilma, who was a long-time Queen’s employee, as well as the university’s first employment equity officer. 

With the statue being a part of their history, the University Club paid for the plaque and the reception and helped promote the event.

It was also a special event for Dr. Bernabei’s daughters providing an opportunity to reconnect with Queen’s and to tell their family’s story.

“The reception in honour of our father was deeply moving for us,” says Mati Bernabei. “He was still a young man when he died, and my sister and I were just teenagers. The circumstances of his death were difficult – grief weighed heavily at the time. But now, 38 years later, this event provided my sister and I, and our father’s friends and former students, an opportunity to celebrate his life, his art, and his passion for teaching.”

“I have no doubt that he would be absolutely delighted that it was Venus who brought us all together,” says Gina Jack. “When he brought her to the University Club he was extremely ill – nonetheless, he hatched a plan, and snuck his beloved Venus into her rightful home. The reception, and the plaque, honouring her, and establishing her place officially as a permanent resident of the club, was the perfect way to honour our father.”

An international learning experience

[Ajay Agarwal]
Ajay Agarwal (School of Urban and Regional Planning), centre, and a group of his students visit Auroville during the SURP 827 International Planning Project course trip to India. (Supplied Photo)

When students from the School of Urban and Regional Planning return to India this year, they will once again be gaining hands-on experience while working on a real planning project.

Queen's In the World

The students of the SURP 827 International Planning Project course will also be gaining valuable international experience, learning the intricacies of working in a new environment, in a cultural setting different from their own.

This experience is what has made the course so successful, explains Associate Professor Ajay Agarwal, who created and continues to deliver the course as it enters a fifth year.

For this work, Dr. Agarwal received the International Education Innovation Award, which recognizes excellence in the internationalization of curriculum in programs or courses. It is one of the six Principal’s Teaching and Learning Awards.

The opportunity to travel to India and work on a project with community members has been an important draw for the course and SURP, which was recently integrated into the Department of Geography and Planning, Dr. Agarwal says. Increasingly, planning firms are working on a global scale. While a head office may be located in a city like Toronto, the firm can be working on projects anywhere around the world.

“I personally think that for students who want to practice planning, the course widens their view of the world, because many of our students have always lived and worked in Canada,” he says. “Really, in a global setting, where firms from Canada do projects all over the world including planning projects, it is very important for these students to get outside their comfort zone and face the challenges of working in a foreign environment, which includes language, culture, customs, habits, everything. That gives them the confidence of being able to work on a project that has any magnitude of challenge.”

Through the course students learn to be adaptable and creative in finding solutions and to manage any adversity they may face.

Receiving the award has helped raise the profile of the course and SURP within the university and, on a personal level, has provided some “external validation” for the work he has done over the years, Dr. Agarwal adds.

Through the nomination process, Dr. Agarwal has received valuable feedback about the course from past students, many of whom are now working in international planning. All of those who responded said it was a positive experience and many added that the course has helped them within the job market. This positive reputation has resulted in a growing interest in the course.

“It’s not an exaggeration to say it has become one of the most popular courses we offer at SURP,” Dr. Agarwal says.  “Quite a few students now say that they chose Queen’s over other universities for this graduate program in planning because of that international experience that we offer.”

The Principal’s Teaching and Learning Awards, created in 2015, recognize individuals and teams who have shown exceptional innovation and leadership in teaching and learning on campus. The awards are administered by the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

The International Education Innovation Award honours the outstanding efforts of an individual or any combination of faculty, staff, and/or student team who contributes to the creation or revitalization of a course or program of international learning at Queen’s, in alignment with the Queen’s University Comprehensive International Plan (QUCIP).

Nominations for the 2017 award are currently being accepted. All nominations should be sent electronically in PDF form to inforef@queensu.ca no later than Tuesday, Aug. 1, by 4 pm. For more information about the award and the nomination form and process, visit the CTL website.

Chipped Off returns to the stage

Local theatre group brings unique production to the Isabel.

For the fourth year in a row, Chipped Off Performance Collective is welcoming the community to another unique production at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

Opening this week, the local theatre group, headed by Kim Renders, a professor in the Dan School of Drama and Music, presents Rhinoceros or What’s Different About Me? The play revolves around the 1959 avant-garde play penned by Eugene Ionesco, in which each of a town’s residents is replaced, one by one, by a rhinoceros.

Joining the production of Rhinoceros are (l to r): Amie Bello, Kim Renders and Hannah Smith.

The collective first took shape five years ago, when Queen’s student Dan Vena approached Renders about directing a play he wrote.

“He said he was tired of not seeing himself or his community represented on Kingston’s stages,” Renders explains about staging How to Bake a Pie in Ten Steps or less: A Transgender Fairytale in 2013.

This year, Renders decided to mount an adaptation of Ionesco’s Rhinoceros, shortly after the election in the United States.

“The play provides the skeleton for the production but it’s the community pieces that actually fill it out,” she says . “It’s going to be a very eclectic show with many different components including multi-media, monologues and poems among other performance pieces.”

While the production brings together community members from 14 to 80-years-old, Renders says this isn’t just a local talent show.

“There are about 50 community members involved in the show, including a significant numbers of professionals providing the artistic support,” she says. “The show is also all about creating a voice for individuals from all corners of the community and bringing them together through artistic expression, to be a part of something bigger.”

The show runs Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, June 14-16, at 7:30 pm, and Sunday, June 18, at 2 p.m. Admission is $15.

Chipped Off Performance Collective believes in the power of art and performance to surprise, enlighten, provoke, astonish, challenge and change. We are committed to presenting work that speaks to the needs and concerns of underrepresented or marginalized communities in Kingston. Embracing a feminist and queer perspective at all times, Chipped Off Performance Collective works to grow and diversify the range of local artistic, cultural, and theatrical production available to Kingston audiences.

A teaching and learning innovator

[Richard Ascough]
Richard Ascough, Director of the School of Religion, has won three teaching awards in less than a year, including, most recently, the D2L Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning from the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. (University Communications) 

It has been a banner year for Richard Ascough in terms of teaching awards.

First, the director of the School of Religion received the Fall 2016 Frank Knox Teaching Award from the Alma Mater Society (AMS) for RELS 321 – Greek and Roman Religions, a course he taught in the fall semester. He then received an Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA).

Now, he has received a third prize: the D2L Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning from the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Many studies have shown that developing innovative teaching and learning methods helps increase engagement and interaction for students. But as Dr. Ascough explains, “The challenge is always how do you get a humanities course, especially one focused on antiquity, to be interactive and problem based,” he says. “I came up with assignments that get students working at their group tables, get them interacting with each other in a smaller group, and then in some form in the larger classroom.”

One assignment had students debate which goddess is better, Cybele or Isis, after conducting research through pre-class readings and online resources. Another assignment had students recreate an initiation ritual for each of the seven grades in the cult of Mithras. Very little is known about the rituals. But that’s not the point, Dr. Ascough says.

“Who knows, one of them may have got it right!,” he says. “It’s more about the process of how the rituals form and what do rituals do. We debrief about that afterward. It’s the skill of how do you use disparate archeological and literary data to create and present a hypothesis.”

In winning the award Dr. Ascough will be attending the STLHE annual conference being held June 20-23 in Halifax along with a two-year membership. It’s an exciting prospect as he has long been involved in pedagogy, published on the subject and run workshops. He’s also sure that the opportunities will provide great experience as he takes on a new role at the university.

“Professionally I am becoming associate dean (teaching and learning) in the Faculty of Arts and Science as of July 1,” he says. “So to have affirmation about some of the innovative things I’ve tried as I am stepping into a role where I may be able to help facilitate this with others is very important.”

In nominating him for the various awards, students praised his ability to integrate lecture material, class discussions, and in-class assignments to create an engaging environment where they are able to learn from the instructor as well as each other. Other students added that they appreciated that he is always willing to make time for them.

That engagement is a key to long-lasting learning, Dr. Ascough explains.

“When students are excited about what they are doing then they are more engaged and by engaging more I think the learning is able to go more deep with them, particularly with the skills they are learning in my class: analysis of data, being able to formulate arguments and then articulating those arguments. That to me is what engaged learning does.”

On top of the recent recognition, Dr. Ascough has also received Queen’s top two university-wide teaching awards – the Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching (2000) and the Chancellor A. Charles Baillie Teaching Award (2009). 

A week of honours for Art McDonald

  • University of Toronto Chancellor Michael Wilson confers an honorary degree upon Arthur McDonald, the winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics on Thursday, June 8.
    University of Toronto Chancellor Michael Wilson confers an honorary degree upon Arthur McDonald, the winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics on Thursday, June 8. (Photo by Lisa Sakulensky)
  • Arthur McDonald receives an honorary degree from McGill University Chancellor Michael Meighen during the convocation ceremony on Monday, June 5 in Montreal.
    Arthur McDonald receives an honorary degree from McGill University Chancellor Michael Meighen during the convocation ceremony on Monday, June 5 in Montreal. (Photo provided by McGill University)
  • Arthur McDonald, third from left, stands with Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Arthur McDonald, third from left, stands with Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

It has been a busy week for Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald, as the Nobel Laureate received three honorary degrees.

Beginning on Monday, June 5 Dr. McDonald traveled to Montreal to receive an honorary degree from McGill University. He then returned home to Queen’s where he was honoured on Wednesday, June 7 at Grant Hall. Then on Thursday, June 8 Dr. McDonald was conferred a third degree from the University of Toronto.

A faculty member of the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Dr. McDonald shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for his longtime research and groundbreaking findings into neutrinos – sub-atomic particles considered the basic building blocks of the universe.

Dr. McDonald arrived at Queen’s in 1989 and was the inaugural Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics. He also was the co-recipient of the 2007 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics and the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

He continues research on neutrinos and dark matter at the SNOLAB underground laboratory near Sudbury and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics.

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