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Employee and Family Assistance Program provider publishes November edition of ‘Lifelines’

November edition of Lifelines
Read the November edition of Lifelines online.

As the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) provider for Queen’s University, Homewood Health publishes a number of regular newsletters, including Lifelines.

The monthly newsletter is intended to support key personnel with a wealth of information on the topic presented. The November edition, entitled How taking care of your finances can reduce your stress level provides information on different methods to improve your finances in support your mental health. 

For more information on the Queen’s EFAP, visit the Human Resources website.

For 24-hour EFAP services call 1-800-663-1142 (English) or 1-866-398-9505 (French). 

Gaels rowers nab three national medals

"Louise Munro"
Louise Munro of the Queen's Gaels claimed a silver medal in the women's single event at the Canadian University Rowing Championships in Burnaby, B.C. (File photo)

A quick roundup of Queen's Gaels athletes and teams in action over the weekend:

The Queen’s Gaels put in an impressive showing at the Canadian University Rowing Championships in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday winning three medals.

Starting off the morning races on Burnaby Lake was Gavin Stone in men's single who claimed the bronze medal with a time of 6:51.2, a mere half second out of second place.

Shortly after, Louise Munro added to the medal haul with a silver in the women's single, finishing with a time of 8:20.4.

Next up was Alexander Bernst and Nicholas Grubic in the lightweight men's double and the duo brought in another silver medal with a time of 6:56.5.

Other strong results included a fifth place for Elliot Hall and Robert Cadman in men's pair while Paige Adams and Cassidy Deane raced to a sixth-place finish in the women's pair.

With three national medals to their name and the university season concluded, the Gaels now look ahead to the National Rowing Championships on Nov. 9 in Burnaby.

WOMEN’S RUGBY

The Queen’s Gaels took a resounding 38-10 win over the No. 7 seed Acadia Axewomen in the U Sports consolation semifinal in a snowy Lethbridge on Saturday.

On Thursday the No. 6 Gaels fell to the No. 3 Calgary Dinos 41-5 in windy, snowy conditions.

“It is always a challenge to recover from a quarterfinal loss and I thought our leadership group did a really admirable job keep our athletes dialed in,” said Queen’s head coach Dan Valley. “I couldn't be more proud of the effort they put in today.”

Queen’s got on the board early and often with a pair of tries by 2017 U SPORTS Rookie of the Year Sophie de Goede and another by Nadia Popov, who converted all three for a 21-0 lead.

After Acadia got on the board Thea White scored an unconverted try for the Gaels and then Popov went on a 40-metre scamper for her second try of the game for 31-5 lead at the half.

After the break Janna Slevinsky added another try for the final score for the Gaels.

MEN’S RUGBY

The Queen's Gaels had no trouble getting past the Laurier Golden Hawks in the OUA semifinal on Saturday with a 54-7 win. The Gaels will now host the OUA championship next weekend at Nixon Field.

The Gaels pushed the pace on Laurier early, looking to get an early lead and Ruairidh MacPhail opened the scoring with Alex Colborne coverting to give Queen's an early 7-0 lead.

After Laurier evened the score the Gaels broke the game open with 21 points in a 10-minute span with tries from Dylan Young, Alex Pipchuk, and Lachlon Devir. Heading into halftime, the Gaels led 35-7.

In the second half, Evan Underwood extended the lead with a try at the 59-minute mark and Queen's added two more tries and conversions to seal the win.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The Queen’s Gaels beat the UOIT Ridgebacks 3-0 to take the OUA bronze medal on Sunday in Oshawa.

A day earlier, the Gaels feel to a 1-0 extra-time loss against the Western Mustangs in the OUA semifinal.

Against OUIT, Queen’s got goals from Lidia Bradau, Matija Skoko, and Alexandra Doane.

This is the team’s third medal in three years after winning gold in 2015 and silver in 2016.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen's Gaels (3-0) crushed the Brock Badgers 80-38 Sunday at the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

Andrea Priamo led the way with 16 point and eight rebounds while Marianne Alarei added 15 points and seven boards.

On Saturday the Gaels topped the No. 5 McMaster Marauders (1-1) 90-79 at the ARC.

After McMaster came out hot to grab an early lead the hosts dominated the fourth quarter – including an 18-1 run – to put the game away.

Veronika Lavergne had a massive game with 29 points and nine rebounds while Priamo added 24 points.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

After opening the season with a pair of wins, the Queen’s Gaels (2-1) dropped a tough 91-86 decision to the No. 2 nationally-ranked Brock Badgers (4-0) Saturday at the ARC.

The Gaels closed to within a point with 10 seconds left but a miscue on an inbounds play sealed the win for the Badgers. Guard Jaz Bains scored 22 points with seven assists while Quinton Gray added 19 points.

On Saturday, the Gaels beat the McMaster Marauders (1-1) 99-87 at the ARC. Mike Shoveller busted out with 31 points and 11 rebounds for a double-double and Harry Range had 17 points.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

It was quite the finish on Saturday night for the No. 10 Queen's Gaels (5-1-0-1) as the Tricolour mounted an amazing comeback in the final minutes of regulation and overtime to beat the Laurentian Voyageurs (2-0-2-1).

Jessica Wakefield scored twice, including the overtime winner to lead the Gaels to victory.

Trailing 3-1 on a goal by Addi Halladay, the Gaels tied it up with goals in the closing five minutes from Wakefield and Halladay. Just 25 seconds into overtime Wakefield found the back of the net for the win.

On Friday the Gaels grabbed another late win beating the Nipissing Lakers (2-0-2-0) 3-2 at the Memorial Centre.

With the game tied 2-2 in the closing minute, Jessica Wakefield netted the game-winner with six seconds left. Taylor Hicks and Michele Knecht scored for the Gaels earlier. Stephanie Pascal picked up the win in net with 25 saves

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen’s Gaels (4-1-3) earned a split on the weekend with a 2-1 overtime win over the No. 9 UQTR Patriots (7-1-1) Saturday in Trois Rivieres.

Duncan Campbell scored the winner at 3:35 of overtime, while Slater Doggett scored a shorthanded marker in the third period. Jacob Brennan was solid between the pipes for Queen's and made 29 saves in the victory.

On Friday the Gaels tumbled 6-3 to the Patriots after falling behind early. Spencer Abraham, Eric Ming, and Ryan Bloom scored for the Gaels.

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen's Gaels (1-1) suffered a heartbreaking loss in a hard-fought five-set match against the York Lions (3-0) on Sunday, falling 25-21, 15-25, 31-29, 22-25 and 20-18. Markus Trence had 27 kills with an ace and eight blocks and Jack Peckham added 10 kills and six blocks.

On Friday the Gaels won their home opener against the Nipissing Lakers in straight sets 25-12, 25-21 and 27-25. Trence had 18 kills and an ace while Zane Grossinger had 35 assists.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen's Gaels (2-1) swept the Nipissing Lakers (1-1) in three sets in their home opener 25-22, 25-20 and 25-16 Saturday at the ARC. Shannon Neville led the Gaels attack with 12 kills and four aces while Sierra Hardy had 27 assists.

On Sunday the Gaels (2-1) suffered a straight sets loss to the York Lions (1-1) 25-15, 25-18 and 25-19. Despite their best efforts the York attack was too strong. Neville finished with nine kills and two aces.

Grant Hall becoming a Venetian lagoon

You walk through a towering archway to find San Marco Square laid out before you. A grand, two-story façade demands attention across the dance floor, while gondolas wait in side-winding canals to either side.

The two-story San Marco Square main structure takes shape in Grant Hall. (University Communications)
The two-story San Marco Square main structure takes shape in Grant Hall. (University Communications)

Italy? Think again. The 2018 Science Formal will bring Venice to Queen’s, and you’re invited to a sneak peek in support of the United Way.

The Queen’s fourth year engineering students will host an Open House on Saturday, Nov. 4 from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Grant Hall. The lecture hall will be open to the public for walk-throughs, by donation to the United Way. This is a great opportunity to take pictures and take in the results of three months of hard work.

Claire Phillips (Sci’18), Arts Chair for the project, says the Science Formal is a great way for engineering students to show both the scientific and artistic sides of engineering.

“We have a lot of people that are really creative and artistic,” Ms. Phillips says. “The theme this year is a Venetian masquerade. All of the rooms are based on the concept of guests travelling through the different aspects of Venice.”

An engineering student works on the lettering of sign for the 2018 Science Formal, “Welcome to Laguna di Venezia”. (University Communications)
An engineering student works on the lettering of sign for the 2018 Science Formal, “Welcome to Laguna di Venezia”. (University Communications)

The project covers five lecture rooms in Grant Hall and Kingston Hall. These venues will include the iconic San Marco Square, a glassblowing room, villa garden, canal hallways, and a masquerade ballroom.

“Every engineering student volunteer their time over the course of three months for this event,” says Matthew Clark (Sci’18), Convener and lead of the project. “I got involved as the Convener because I wanted to be part of something unique to the country and university. I can’t think of any other university program that lets engineering students build a two-story structure inside a marquee building on campus.”

You can find out more about the Open House and the Science Formal on the Science Formal website.

Members of the Science Formal Committee pose for a photo in front of the work in progress centerpiece of the 2018 Science Formal in Grant Hall. From left to right: Rob Purcell, Construction Chair; Claire Philips, Art Chair; Matthew Clark, Convener; and Kristen Wadey, Communications Chair. (University Communications)
Members of the Science Formal Committee pose for a photo in front of the work in progress centerpiece of the 2018 Science Formal in Grant Hall. From left to right: Rob Purcell, Construction Chair; Claire Philips, Art Chair; Matthew Clark, Convener; and Kristen Wadey, Communications Chair. (University Communications)

Second Queen’s Remembers plinth to be dedicated to 5th Field Company

Plinth to be unveiled at a special ceremony on Saturday, November 11 at 2 p.m.

The 5th Field Company. (Supplied Photo)
The 5th Field Company. (Supplied Photo)

With the threat of war in Europe, Canada began to form volunteer units for military training. Queen’s University was the first Canadian university to form an officially recognized military unit, in 1909, comprising engineering students and faculty; the 5th Field Company. In August 1914, the government called upon the 5th Field Company when it needed space to train and prepare its soldiers. The men were sent to Valcartier, Québec. Their mission: turn acres of land into a highly organized camp for up to 30,000 men, with roads, a water supply system, and space for tents. Once the work was complete, the group was divided up – some headed across the sea to fight, while others supported the war effort from Canada.

The unit was ‘the only purely University Company in Canada’, and was led by Professor and Major Alexander Macphail. Under his leadership the students and faculty were trained in the years prior to the outbreak of war, making them well prepared to respond when Canada entered the fight.

In recognition of the contributions of the 5th Field Company, a commemorative plinth will be unveiled on Saturday, November 11 at a special ceremony beginning at 2 pm. Joining Queen’s for this ceremony will be local veterans and military members, including representatives from the Royal Military College of Canada.

“On Remembrance Day, we reflect on the service and sacrifices of Canadian men and women, during both wartime and peacekeeping missions,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “This year, we pay special tribute to a group of Queen’s alumni and professors – the 5th Field Company – while also acknowledging the many others in our community who have served, and continue to serve, our country. This plinth will serve as an important and lasting reminder of their legacy.”

The plinth will feature an eight-page booklet containing information about the company, how it was formed, and their training. It will speak of the wartime contributions of the company, as well as the history of the company between the World Wars. Mention will be made of the Memorial Room in the John Deutsch University Centre in which the names of the fallen are listed.

The monument will be located at the intersection of Union Street and Fifth Field Company Lane, which runs through campus past a number of buildings including Nicol Hall, Miller Hall, and the Fifth Field Company Campus Bookstore, also named for the company. This is the second plinth to be unveiled as part of the Queen’s Remembers initiative. Through this initiative, Queen’s is reflecting upon its history in a project to commemorate those who have made a significant and noteworthy contribution to the university. The planning for the Queen’s Remembers initiative was led by Principal Woolf in collaboration with the facilities and university planning teams, University Relations, and those with specific ties to the topics being commemorated.

The first Queen’s Remembers plinth was unveiled in October and dedicated to the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples as the traditional inhabitants of the land. Future plinths will be announced later this academic year.

A growing ‘home away from home’ for Indigenous students

Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre set to double in size.

144 and 146 Barrie Street. The Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre is currently housed in 146 Barrie and will be expanding next door in 2018. (University Communications)
144 and 146 Barrie Street. The Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre is currently housed in 146 Barrie and will be expanding next door in 2018. (University Communications)

Queen’s Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre is doubling in size.

The design process for the expansion of the centre, which will involve the house next door to its 146 Barrie St. location, is now underway. Renovations to both 146 and 144 Barrie are expected to begin in the new year.

“As enrolment among Indigenous students increases at Queen’s, we recognize that Four Directions has outgrown its space,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean (Student Affairs). “In line with recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Task Force, we are excited to be creating a new, larger ‘home away from home’ for students, with more amenities and staff, as well as programming and community-building opportunities.”

The university has engaged Two Row Architect, a firm based in Six Nations that has worked on many post-secondary campuses. Consultations with students, staff, faculty, and community members took place over the summer, to identify values, goals, and aspirations for the new facility. These include learning, inclusivity, the presence of craft, the importance of food, connection to the earth, and the integration of natural materials, natural light, and views.

The current plan is for one building to be used for gatherings and activities, including feasts and cultural programming, while the other will be offices, where students will meet one-on-one with staff, and student study spaces including a first-floor library.

“We want to create more spaces for all of our students to gather, connect, and learn,” says Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), the university’s inaugural Director of Indigenous Initiatives, who served as Director of the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre for the past seven years. “Expanding the centre is an important part of the reconciliation work underway at Queen’s. It will help us continue to build relationships across campus and in the local community, and increase the visibility and awareness of Indigenous cultures, knowledge, teachings and supports.”

The $600,000 project is being primarily funded by the Division of Student Affairs. The federal government is also contributing through an Enabling Accessibility Fund grant for upgrades that will make both buildings more accessible. During construction, the centre will remain open while work is done on the second building. Operations will then temporarily move to the new building, as the current centre is renovated.

Learn more about the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre.

Read about the recommendations of the university’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force

Glass, metal, and stone come together on IWC project

  • Repointing work is underway to touch up the limestone façade on the front of the IWC. (University Communications)
    Repointing work is underway to touch up the limestone façade on the front of the IWC. (University Communications)
  • The eastern side of the building is taking shape, where glass meets metal and metal meets heritage limestone. (University Communications)
    The eastern side of the building is taking shape, where glass meets metal and metal meets heritage limestone. (University Communications)
  • Lead contractor EllisDon aims to have the site building largely enclosed within the next few weeks, with tarps covering some exposed sections. (University Communications)
    Lead contractor EllisDon aims to have the site building largely enclosed within the next few weeks, with tarps covering some exposed sections. (University Communications)
  • Heavy pre-cast concrete panels are lifted into place on the north side of the IWC. The panels have been arriving by truck from Ottawa over the past week. (University Communications)
    Heavy pre-cast concrete panels are lifted into place on the north side of the IWC. The panels have been arriving by truck from Ottawa over the past week. (University Communications)
  • Once the building is enclosed, the focus turns indoors. The aim is to have sections of the building ready for Spring 2018, with a grand opening Fall 2018. (University Communications)
    Once the building is enclosed, the focus turns indoors. The aim is to have sections of the building ready for Spring 2018, with a grand opening Fall 2018. (University Communications)

Large pre-cast concrete panels are hoisted into the air, expertly maneuvered into place, and connected with the outer walls of the building.

On another side, glass panels weighing 230 kilograms each are lifted and slipped into the aluminum housing, becoming part of the building’s south-eastern face.

The Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) is rapidly taking shape now that demolition work is complete. Contractors aim to have the structure largely closed in within the next few weeks, using tarps to cover some sections. The whole building should be entirely enclosed by the end of the year, allowing the internal work to proceed without interference from the weather.

“The project is proceeding well and we are taking steps to ensure the site, and neighbouring buildings, are ready for the winter,” says Robert Polegato, one of the Project Managers in Physical Plant Services. “There will be some impacts to traffic around the site in the coming weeks, and we are reminding everyone to exercise patience and caution when driving, walking, or cycling past the IWC.”

As part of the remaining exterior work, large slabs of concrete are being brought in on trucks. Once the installation of panels on the southern and western sides of the building begins, likely in late November, there will also be a lane reduction on Union in front of the centre while additional panels are brought to the site.

Stay tuned for more updates regarding the Innovation and Wellness Centre project in the coming weeks.

Queen’s United Way campaign surpasses two-thirds of goal

The Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

To date, the campaign has reached $216,327, or 67.6 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

Students accessing Indigenous self-identification mechanism

More than 100 students with Indigenous ancestry have chosen to self-identify to the university within the first few months of the launch of a new mechanism in the SOLUS student information system.

"Four Directions Aboriginal Students Centre Welcome Back Barbecue"
The annual Welcome Back Barbecue held in September at the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre was attended by students, faculty, staff and community members. (Photo by Candice Pinto)

Self-identifying provides students with the opportunity to become part of the Aboriginal community at Queen’s, practice and/or learn more about their culture, and access resources like tutoring services, scholarships, cultural workshops, and on-campus Elders.

Some students choose to self-identify to the university during the application process, but until now, that has been the only time they can formally do so. This voluntary and confidential mechanism, comprising five questions, also gives Indigenous students the opportunity to consent to being contacted by an Indigenous student services staff member. To date, almost 60 students have requested outreach.

Vanessa McCourt, Aboriginal Advisor at Four Directions, says she is connecting with students from several faculties and schools.

“We’re seeing a lot more graduate and professional students self-identifying who we otherwise may not have known about,” says Ms. McCourt. “Many students, especially graduate students, may have had to leave an Indigenous community at their previous school, and come to Queen’s without a connection or way to form those communities here. By self-identifying, and receiving resources like the Four Directions E-Newsletter, students are able to foster those new relationships here at Queen’s. I am also in touch with some distance students who are accessing services and supports.”

The mechanism is being promoted across campus through posters, the distribution of bookmarks and brochures, on social media and an on-line hub of information. A new video and poster series also launched this month. In the video, Indigenous students and recent grads talk about why they choose to self-identify.

“I’ve never not self-identified. It has made me more comfortable with myself,” says Taylor Bluhm (NSc’18). “It’s nice to talk to people who are going through the same things as you are. If I ever have a question about absolutely anything, Four Directions is always there to help answer my questions.”  

“I wouldn’t have gotten involved with so many things if I didn’t self-identify,” adds Thomas Dymond (Meds’20). “Students unions, different projects, and ultimately jobs, that all came from getting involved, getting to know people, and being a part of a community.”

The mechanism was developed with funding from the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skill Development’s Targeted Initiatives Fund. This month, Ms. McCourt and Paul Pearsall, Associate University Registrar (Student Information Systems), are presenting at a national post-secondary systems conference about the mechanism, its development, and the results to date.

The text used for the mechanism was developed by a student-led project team, and included a campus-wide consultation with students, faculty members, staff and other institutions to come up with a set of optional questions that aims to encourage self-identification. The application was designed and implemented by the Enterprise Solutions Peoplesoft team in the Office of the University Registrar. 

To learn more about Indigenous self-identification at Queen’s, visit queensu.ca/fdasc/self-identify

Invitation to provide feedback to Queen’s Principalship Review

Queen’s University Chancellor Jim Leech recently sent out an email to all staff, students, and faculty inviting everyone to complete a survey on the present state and future development of the university and of the principalship. Chancellor Leech is the chair of the Joint Board/Senate Committee to Review the Principalship that was established earlier this term when Daniel Woolf indicated he wishes to be considered for a third and final term. He will complete his current term in June 2019.

The committee wants to hear from members of the Queen’s community and the feedback it receives will help inform its discussions. The committee is planning to submit its recommendation on reappointment to the Board of Trustees in December.

The email was sent out by the University Secretariat’s Office on behalf of the chancellor on Wednesday, Oct. 25 to faculty, student, and staff Queen’s email accounts. It includes a link to the online survey where people can share their thoughts confidentially as well as a link to a webpage with information that may be helpful, including a letter from Principal Woolf. Please note that anonymous responses are not permitted.

The survey will remain open until Nov. 17, 2017 at noon and access to it is only from the email invitation.

If you do not wish to complete the survey or you did not receive the email invitation, you can visit the Joint Board-Senate Committee to Review the Principalship webpage to find out more about how to contribute your feedback. You may also email univsec@queensu.ca with any questions you may have.

Provost and VP (Finance and Administration) Budget Presentation 2017-18 video

For those who were not able to attend recent budget presentations by Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon and Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) Donna Janiec, please watch the below video to see their presentation.

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