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A champion of equity and inclusivity

University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights Irène Bujara to retire in January 2018

After 25 years of service, Irène Bujara, University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights, will be retiring from her position as of January 31, 2018.

Irène Bujara, University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights.
Irène Bujara, University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights, will retire after 25 years at Queen's.

Ms. Bujara came to Queen’s in 1992 as the inaugural Director of the Human Rights Office. The Equity portfolio was added to her responsibilities in 2005 and she has held the position of University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights since that time. Throughout her tenure, she has guided the evolution of the university’s employment equity and educational, accessibility, anti-racism, and inclusion programs and mobilized countless initiatives to support the advancement of a welcoming and respectful campus community.

“Queen’s has greatly benefitted from Ms. Bujara’s passion and leadership over the past 25 years, and we will continue build on her work towards a fully welcoming and inclusive campus,” says Benoit-Antoine Bacon, Provost and VP (Academic).  “We are in all debt to Ms. Bujara and it is fitting that she was recently awarded a Distinguished Service Award in recognition of her work for the Queen’s community.”

In addition to working to prevent and address issues relating to harassment and discrimination, Ms. Bujara also established a forward-looking vision for the Human Rights Office and Equity Office, developing long-term strategic plans, policies, and proactive planning tools to support measurable progress. Ms. Bujara and her team’s work recently received an Employment Equity Achievement Award from the federal government in recognition of Queen’s Accessibility Framework, Employment Equity Framework, and their innovative evaluation tool, the Diversity and Equity Assessment and Planning (DEAP) application. 

During her time as the University Advisor on Equity and Human Rights, Ms. Bujara has also focused on supporting and engaging members of the Queen’s community, including overseeing the establishment of a number of resource groups and professional development programming such as the “From Diversity to Inclusion” certificate, as well as engagement initiatives like the “Woman Recreated Mosaic Project.”

“The accomplishment I am most proud of is to have built a team in both the Human Rights and Equity sections of the Office that is so responsive to the needs of the community,” says Ms. Bujara.

A further announcement about Ms. Bujara’s replacement will be made prior to her departure. In lieu of a celebration, she has requested the university make a donation to the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health in honor of Leo Yerxa, an Ojibwe artist who gave generously of his time and talent to Queen’s and the Office’s many projects for over 25 years, and who passed away in September 2017. Colleagues who wish to do so are also invited to drop in to the Equity and Human Rights Office on January 31 to wish her well.  

Helping international students thrive

Dr. Arunima Khanna, Cross-Cultural Advisor, shares the challenges and rewards of her work in supporting and offering counselling to international students.
Dr. Arunima Khanna, Cross-Cultural Advisor, shares the challenges and rewards of her work in supporting and offering counselling to international students. (University Communications)

The Gazette talked with Arunima Khanna, Cross-Cultural Advisor with Student Wellness Services, as part of our coverage of International Education Week. Dr. Khanna provides counselling services to the 2,496 international undergraduate and graduate students studying at Queen’s, who come from 108 countries. Her work focuses on helping international students to navigate and adjust to campus life, as well as connecting them with resources and counselling for a range of personal and interpersonal issues that have an impact on physical and and mental health.

What type of support does cross-cultural counselling offer international students?

Our first point of contact with students is to participate in the orientation that is offered to degree seeking and exchange international students. Our message is that studying abroad can be both exciting and rewarding, but also challenging, sometimes stressful and overwhelming. The important thing for them to know is that there are resources and people that they can approach for help and support. Our aim is to put a face to our service, and to normalize seeking help and hopefully to reduce stigma.

After that, students are welcome to ask us for one-on-one counselling if they are having difficulties or if they have concerns about their environment and so on.  Sometimes these concerns are adjustment issues that pass with time, but sometimes more serious or pre-existing mental health issues can emerge. I always try to contextualize international student concerns within their social-cultural environment, by trying to understand how privilege, social and classroom dynamics, and their social experience impacts their mental well-being. Being away from your usual sources of support, experiences of exclusion or marginalization, and micro aggressions can cause an impact on mental health.

We also provide workshops to staff and faculty on multi-cultural competencies, and identifying the unique needs and issues of a diverse student population. I think “adjustment” has to be a two way process; it is not just about international students adjusting to Queen’s; the system has to adjust to the changing demographics of the student population as well.

We also try to advocate on behalf of our international students based on issues that we are seeing, the trends, what we think will be helpful for students to have a positive experience, and what is important to prevent mental health difficulties.

What sparked your interest in this field?

I am very interested in the social determinants of mental health and wellness. When I was training to be a psychologist, I noticed that these were often a missing piece in our interventions; the social-cultural contexts in which distress or issues were occurring were not being given full attention. I noticed that we needed to address not just the presenting issue, but also the contexts in which it is occurring. That is what got me interested in this work.

I firmly believe in using a strengths based, multicultural, equity, and social justice lens in my counselling and advocacy work. I also feel that if Canadian universities are actively recruiting international students, we really need to provide equitable learning environments, as well as culturally competent and meaningful services to our students.

How does your work feed into International Education efforts at Queen’s?

I hope that the work that we do provides support to international students to be well and really thrive during their time here.

As counsellors, we also have the privilege of hearing personal stories from students – their experiences, what are their struggles, disappointments, and successes. I think this information is important to share with senior administration and other decision makers when they design programs, equitable classrooms, support services, etc.

What needs to be addressed to see fewer mental health issues in the international student population?

First, helping students adapt to the academic culture. Academic difficulties cause vulnerability and it can be the beginning of distress. Students are spending a lot of money to come here, they have important academic and career goals that are important to them, so feeling that their goals are in jeopardy can erode their sense of wellbeing. I think that investing in providing early informational and academic support is very important. More TAs and time with TAs will also be helpful.

The second piece is helping students to achieve a sense of connection and community. Being part of a community, establishing a sense of belonging, and connectedness is critical to both academic success and student wellness. As a university, we need to encourage our population to cross demographic boundaries and connect with each other. Many of the undergraduate international students that I have seen say that they feel invisible and often excluded on this campus which is a problem.

What’s the biggest challenge in your role?

The biggest challenge for me is how to help international students who are feeling isolated and marginalized – how to help them build community and make connections. Facilitating a more integrated student body is a challenge. Right now we have pockets of different ethnic groups – I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that, we do need to be with people who are similar to us – but we also need to cross those demographic boundaries and to connect as a cohesive community.  We have been working with the Peer Support Centre, who have shown a lot of interest in fostering multicultural competency, to see what the student body can do to encourage a more inclusive student community. I do feel that these efforts need to come from students to be truly meaningful and successful.

I think as a university, our awareness of these issues of diversity, inclusion and equity awareness is growing. But, how do you encourage students to cross those demographic boundaries?

What’s the most rewarding aspect of your work?

The most rewarding aspect is working with this wonderful and diverse group of students. I have learned so much from them! Being present with a student in their moment of need or self-doubt, and helping them connect with their strengths is so rewarding. Helping them name what is going on for them in terms of the environment when they are blaming themselves, changing these attributions is so important. To intervene, to be of service and be part of their journey of claiming space and building a sense of belonging, achieving their personal and academic goals is very rewarding.

What can people around campus do be more inclusive of students going through intercultural adjustment?

We all create the climate at Queen’s and so we bear the responsibility of creating an inclusive and equitable campus. We should try to create opportunities to bring diverse people together and demonstrate the importance of connection. We can work at learning about the experiences of international students not just by attending workshops, but actually applying what we have learned. But most importantly, we can connect at an individual level, be a welcoming and supportive student body and campus, and learn from each other.

We don’t necessarily need to leave Canada to learn about other people and places, we can do it right here on campus. Globalization has to begin right here, in our day-to day interactions!

Fall Convocation: Day 2

  • A PhD recipient looks for his family as he shakes hands with Chancellor Jim Leech, while Principal Daniel Woolf and Rector Cam Yung look on.
    A PhD recipient looks for his family as he shakes hands with Chancellor Jim Leech, while Principal Daniel Woolf and Rector Cam Yung look on.
  • Debbie Docherty speaks after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's during Wednesday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
    Debbie Docherty speaks after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's during Wednesday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
  • A member of the audience takes a video of honorary degree recipient Debbie Docherty as she delivers her speech Wednesday during Fall Convocation.
    A member of the audience takes a video of honorary degree recipient Debbie Docherty as she delivers her speech Wednesday during Fall Convocation.
  • Grant Hall is filled during the fourth ceremony of Fall Convocation on Wednesday, Nov. 15.
    Grant Hall is filled during the fourth ceremony of Fall Convocation on Wednesday, Nov. 15.
  • A PhD recipient is hooded by Kim McAuley, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies, during Wednesday afternoon's convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
    A PhD recipient is hooded by Kim McAuley, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies, during Wednesday afternoon's convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.

Fall Convocation entered its second day at Queen’s University with two ceremonies at Grant Hall.

An honorary degree was conferred upon Debbie Docherty, who spent much of her career at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston for years and served as a mentor to Queen’s students in occupational therapy, nursing, medicine and physiotherapy. She also worked internationally with the Queen’s International Center for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation.

Fall Convocation concludes on Thursday with the final two of the six ceremonies.

See photos from Tuesday's ceremonies.

For a full schedule, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Balancing thousands of relationships

Ryan Rodrigues, Associate Vice-Principal (Alumni Relations and Annual Giving).
Ryan Rodrigues, Associate Vice-Principal (Alumni Relations and Annual Giving), joined Queen's in July.

The Gazette sat down with Ryan Rodrigues, the newly appointed Associate Vice-Principal of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving, to learn about the experience he brings to the role, and his views on coming to Queen’s, educational fundraising, and our school’s alumni culture.

What is your first impression of Queen’s so far?

What’s struck me at Queen’s is the culture of the community, and the alumni body in particular. I just witnessed my first homecoming just over a month ago, and to see nearly 100 groups come back for reunions, and to learn about the traditions and the history of Queen’s, has been much more than I expected.

Both the Kingston and Queen’s communities have been very welcoming to me and my family.

What sort of background are you bringing to your new role?

In the past, a lot of the leaders of Alumni Relations at Queen’s have been products of Queen’s. To be in my role and not be an alumnus of the institution is rare, here.

I’ve worked at the University of Guelph, Ryerson University, Western University, the University of Toronto, and the University of Pennsylvania, so those experiences have given me great insights to bring to this role. I’ve worked in Advancement roles, including Annual Giving and Alumni Relations, as well as in Recruitment roles within the faculty in universities; at University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

These experiences have helped me see how units like Advancement can support the faculties, but I’ve also had the advantage of being part of a faculty, and being supported by the university services I’m part of now. I understand the position of the faculty. That’s been extremely helpful, specifically to this role.

I’ve worked in most of the provinces in Canada, in over 20 countries, and I’ve worked in all of the Queen’s Innovation Nodes key global cities. That’s also helpful in furthering Queen’s business relationships.

What drives your passion for philanthropy and community?

My parents came to Canada from East Africa in 1972, and I was born in Toronto. They came here because they wanted to give me a better life, and they did.

I grew up in Guelph, Ontario, which is quite similar to Kingston, in that it’s a university town and both my parents were adjunct faculty at the University of Guelph and also business people in the community. That town and gown relationship is something I’m quite familiar with, albeit in Guelph.

I got to go to great schools, and I came to the realization that not everyone can go to great schools, many because of the lack of financial capacity. I’m driven to equal the playing field through fundraising. Educational fundraising has been my driving passion.

I do a lot of volunteer work in the local community as well because I feel I have been given so much, I want to give back.

Coming to Queen’s, seeing the principal’s commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion, is very important to me. I think it’s the right time for me to be at Queen’s and I hope I can contribute immeasurably to the community.

How does Alumni Relations and Annual Giving fit into Queen’s?

Our team deals with the full student lifecycle. We strive to engage our 140,000+ alumni, in over 140 countries, to support Queen’s priorities. We connect people with opportunities to volunteer and give back to the Queen’s community on local, national, and international levels. We also work with our alumni to assist with recruitment, because our alumni are our best brand ambassadors.

We also organize homecoming and reunions, so we’re trying to keep classes connected to the school. Also on the philanthropy side, we had approximately 100 groups come to homecoming. A large number of them did class giving campaigns, so they banded together and donated towards a specific cause or project, or to the school’s greatest need, or to a student need, like bursaries and scholarships.

We also have the Queen’s University Alumni Association (QUAA), a dedicate group of volunteers who help foster engagement of alumni in various parts of the world and in Canada. I like to say that these engaged alumni volunteers are valued and integral partners who are a catalyst to our work.

Can you talk a little more about the alumni body and philanthropy?

Many of our alumni are donors. During the last campaign, we saw this wonderful outpouring of support through people volunteering, and also through their philanthropic support to Queen’s. That’s where Annual Giving comes in. Our Queen’s Telefundraising Students call our alumni, update them on what’s happening at the university, and keep them connected to the university. People give back generously to the great causes at Queen’s. We see it as a paying it forward philosophy. Many of the great elements to Queen’s – the buildings, the facilities – will have wonderful donor names on them, and they’ve enhanced what Queen’s has been able to do over many years.

Philanthropy is nothing new at Queen’s, it started with our first principal, and it continues now. It’s my office’s privilege to serve the university and to continue that spirit of volunteerism and philanthropy to make Queen’s even better and keep us at the top of the pack.

What’s your next step to get involved with Queen’s?

It’s not hard for me to get involved with a lot and get excited. I’m curious in nature. I have not gone to Queen’s as a student yet, but that’s actually something I’m hoping to do. I want to formally register as a student and engage in academic life, whether that’s another master’s degree or specific course work.

I’m also excited to become a fan of Queen’s. I’m a varsity athlete, from Western University, so it’s easy for me to cheer for the teams that I’ve been part of. I’m excited to see our Gaels compete at every opportunity I can. Seeing the student-athletes of Queen’s, cheering, and bleeding tricolour for the teams is a really importance piece to me joining this community.       

What’s the number one priority for you and your team over the next year?

Continuing to support our volunteers and donors, while seizing new opportunities to move people to extraordinary levels of support for Queen’s. We’re continuously recognizing the outstanding volunteerism and donations to our institution. That work never ends, and it’s always the top priority.

By recognizing alumni engagement and philanthropic support we strengthen our alumni community culture and model the way for current students to follow.

What’s the biggest challenge coming up for Alumni Relations and Annual Giving?

The biggest challenge is engaging an exponentially growing group of alumni. We’re graduating more students now than we’ve ever had in the past – over 50 per cent of our alumni have graduated in the last 20 years. Reaching that many people, keeping good contact information, and engaging that many people is a challenge. This becomes a volume game, so we have to leverage things like technology, but technology can only build a certain type of relationship.

The human element is hugely important to the work that we do. We don’t want to whittle it down or dilute it, we work to maintain many valuable personal relationships. That’s the challenge: balancing thousands and thousands of relationships for Queen’s, and ensuring that we’re keeping in touch, and that we’re keeping up with the times as well.

What mark would you like to make in this role?

I like the adage of leaving a job better than you were given it. I’ve inherited a wonderful team and alumni body that is so passionate and loyal to Queen’s. My goal is to magnify that. It may be challenging because of scale, but that’s the nut that I need to crack.

Fall Convocation: Day 1

  • John Rae, former chair of the Queen's Board of Trustees and former executive assistant and national campaign chair for the Right Hon. Jean Chrétien, delivers his speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's.
    John Rae, former chair of the Queen's Board of Trustees and former executive assistant and national campaign chair for the Right Hon. Jean Chrétien, delivers his speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's.
  • Oliver Jones performs Oscar Peterson's Hymn to Freedom after he received an honorary degree from Queen's University at Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony in Grant Hall.
    Oliver Jones performs Oscar Peterson's Hymn to Freedom after he received an honorary degree from Queen's University at Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony in Grant Hall.
  • Oliver Jones stands with, from right, Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech, after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's at Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony.
    Oliver Jones stands with, from right, Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech, after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's at Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony.
  • Tara McDonald takes a closer look at the blanket she received as she graduated from Queen's on Tuesday. Ms. McDonald also received the Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award for creating the Queen’s Elephant in the Room Anti-Stigma Campaign for mental health as well as speaking out for Aboriginal students.
    Tara McDonald takes a closer look at the blanket she received as she graduated from Queen's on Tuesday. Ms. McDonald also received the Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award for creating the Queen’s Elephant in the Room Anti-Stigma Campaign for mental health as well as speaking out for Aboriginal students.

Fall Convocation got underway at Queen’s University with the first two of six ceremonies that will take place at Grant Hall.

Honorary degrees, one in each ceremony, were bestowed upon John Rae, a former chair of the Queen’s Board of Trustees, and Oliver Jones, an internationally-renowned pianist who also offered a performance on the Grant Hall stage.

For a full schedule of the ceremonies, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Queen’s engineer returns to graduate after 70 years

  • Bruce Jameson is hooded by Lynann Clapham, Associate Dean (Academic), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation Ceremony.
    Bruce Jameson is hooded by Lynann Clapham, Associate Dean (Academic), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation Ceremony.
  • Bruce Jameson is handed his diploma before going on stage during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
    Bruce Jameson is handed his diploma before going on stage during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
  • Bruce Jameson is congratulated by Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving his degree in engineering chemistry more than 70 years after he first arrived at Queen's.
    Bruce Jameson is congratulated by Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving his degree in engineering chemistry more than 70 years after he first arrived at Queen's.

Bruce Jameson earned a summer internship in the research department at Imperial Oil in Sarnia, Ontario in 1946. He was 22 years old then, with a sharp mind, a strong work ethic, and a fresh, state-of-the-art education in engineering chemistry from Queen’s.

All this was buoyed by the post-war optimism of the time. Anything seemed possible.

The job was an excellent opportunity for a young man to gain some on-the-job research experience at one of Canada’s largest petroleum companies. It worked out well. Jameson’s managers were pleased enough to offer him full-time work starting the following autumn, after he completed his final year at Queen’s. But more than that, it was that first summer in Sarnia when, at a regular bible study group, he met Annabelle. 

Life happened: marriage to his sweetheart, six children, 39 industrious and successful years at Imperial Oil, grandchildren, retirement, and great-grandchildren. It’s the kind of story anyone would be lucky to live but there was at least one loose end.

One of the course requirements for graduation with the class of Sc’47 was German II. No German II; no degree. Jameson doesn’t have German II.

“It was a different time and there was no pressure by my company to get the formal degree,” he says. “We were married immediately after I left school. We had a child the next year. We were busy with a family and building a house.”

Decades later, and long into retirement, Jameson’s story was relayed to his grandson David Currie.

“I work in the petrochemical industry and, though he didn’t seem to talk much about himself, he always seemed knowledgeable about the technical work I was doing,” Currie says. “It turned out that he held some Canadian patents and did some really important development work, so I started prying a little more.”

It just didn’t seem right to Currie that his grandfather, now 93, hadn’t earned his degree after such a long and accomplished career as an engineer. So, he decided to ask administrators at the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s if the university could grant Jameson his degree now, even without German II.

Currie reached out to his industry contacts to find records of his grandfather’s career. It was a tall order considering Jameson retired in 1986. The trail led eventually to Doug MacLaren, Applied Process Research Section Head at Imperial Oil. Though Jameson’s personnel records have long since been destroyed, MacLaren was able to piece together much of Jameson’s work history by sifting through department publications and technical reports.

“Mr. Jameson had a long, productive career as a chemist at Imperial Oil Research,” writes MacLaren after a long list of citations in a support letter to Queen’s. “As a chemist, he was able to participate in the development and implementation of several pivotal processes and techniques that transformed the petrochemical industry in the mid-20th century. Some of this work remains referenced today in the petroleum industry.”

It was enough to convince Dean Kevin Deluzio and Associate Dean (Academic) Lynann Clapham to waive the extra credit and grant Jameson his degree in engineering chemistry. On Tuesday, Nov. 14 Jameson, Currie and some of their extended family attended Fall Convocation at Queen’s so Jameson could receive his degree in person.

“It would never have come about if I had to do it,” says Jameson. “David did it all. I enjoyed my time at Queen’s immensely. Even though I didn’t get the degree, my time at Queen’s prepared me for my working life. I had 39 years in industry and 31 years of retirement, so I’m doing all right.”

New lecture series to celebrate John Meisel

The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies to hold its inaugural event on Thursday, Nov. 23.

  • The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies was announced during his 94th birthday party at the University Club. Helping unveil the poster were, from left: Keith Banting (Political Studies, Smith School of Business); Barbara Crow, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science; Zsuzsa Csergő, Head, Department of Political Studies; and Tom Hewitt Chief Development Officer, Advancement.
    The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies was announced during his 94th birthday party at the University Club. Helping unveil the poster were, from left: Keith Banting (Political Studies, Smith School of Business); Barbara Crow, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science; Zsuzsa Csergő, Head, Department of Political Studies; and Tom Hewitt Chief Development Officer, Advancement.
  • Professor Emeritus John Meisel reacts to the announcement of The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies. The inaugural visiting scholar, Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon, will host a lecture Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
    Professor Emeritus John Meisel reacts to the announcement of The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies. The inaugural visiting scholar, Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon, will host a lecture Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
  • The Queen's community celebrated the 94th birthday of Professor Emeritus John Meisel with a special event Oct. 20 at the University Club.
    The Queen's community celebrated the 94th birthday of Professor Emeritus John Meisel with a special event Oct. 20 at the University Club.

A lot has changed across this country since John Meisel first took up residence here at Queen’s in 1949 as a lecturer in Political Studies. But one thing that remains a constant is the existence of political controversy and the need for scholars, policy makers, and the public to explore and address it.

This is where a new annual lecture series at Queen’s will come in. The John Meisel Scholar Series in Contemporary Political Controversies is set for Thursday, Nov. 23 from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. The inaugural visiting scholar will be Debra Thompson from the University of Oregon and the title of her lecture is “Trump, Race, and Time”.

“This scholar series is an ideal way for the university to celebrate John’s incredible career and the contributions he has made to Queen’s and Canada in his roles as a professor, public servant, and public intellectual,” says Zsuzsa Csergő, Political Studies Department Head. “He was an important voice in many of this country’s most important debates over many decades, including discussions over the future of Canadian culture and arts, and battles over the constitution, to name a few.”

Professor Meisel was also a pioneer in research into political behavior and he wrote widely on Canadian elections, political parties, Quebec politics, science policy, and cultural policy. He was the founding editor of two prestigious academic journals, the Canadian Journal of Political Science and the International Political Science Review. From 1980 to 1983 he was Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and later served as president of the Royal Society of Canada.

Recently he celebrated his 94th birthday at the Queen’s University Club where members of the Political Studies department unveiled the scholar series founded in his honour. The event will also highlight the important contributions of Queen’s Political Studies to scholarship and public engagement both nationally and internationally.

The lecture is open to the public and is being sponsored by the Faculty of Arts and Science with support from alumni.

For more information visit the Queen’s Political Studies website

A week of international festivities

Want to get involved in something international this week? You don’t have to leave campus to enjoy multicultural activities, offered by the Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC), the department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures (LLCU) and the International Programs Office (IPO). From Monday, Nov. 13 to Friday, Nov. 17, the spotlight at Queen’s is on International Education Week.

The week is organized nationally by the Canadian Bureau for International Education, in partnership with over 100 countries. The week highlights the impact of international education on students around the world, and supports efforts of educational organizations that work internationally.

This year, International Education Week reflects on the role of international education in the noble cause of creating a more peaceful, understanding, and cooperative world through education.

Students check out international programs at the International Exchange Fair.
Students check out international programs at the International Exchange Fair. 

The week at Queen's kicked off with the annual International Exchange Fair at Wallace Hall on Monday evening, hosted by the Faculty of Arts & Science and Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science. Students had the opportunity to talk to representatives from partner universities, speak with staff about application and program requirements, and meet students who have either studied on exchange at partner universities or are currently on exchange at Queen's from a partner university.

After the fair, students watched the first of three LLCU International Film Nights, with a viewing of When the Moors Ruled in Europe.

Tuesday

Take in La Grande Bellezza by Italian director Paolo Sorrentino during the second LLCU International Film Night at 5 p.m. in Watson Hall, room 217.

Wednesday

Bring a dish from your country and share with international friends at the International Potluck, starting at 6 pm at the QUIC.

Thursday

The final film night of the week starts at 7 pm in Dunning Hall, room 27, featuring the Egyptian film Mother of the Bride.

Friday

Cap the week’s activities off with the International Photo Contest Launch at 1 pm at the QUIC.

Check out our recent story on international experiential education with a community focus, and keep an eye on the Gazette later this week for stories on how Queen’s is improving international and domestic student experiences, both on campus and abroad.

Join the conversation on international education with the hashtag #IEW2017, and follow @queensuipo for the latest news from the International Programs Office.

Sumner, MacDougall lift women's cross country team to U SPORTS silver medal

"USPORTS Women's Cross Country race 2017"
Queen's Gaels runners Claire Sumner, centre, and Branna MacDougall, right, start off the U SPORTS women's cross country race Sunday in Victoria, B.C. Sumner finished second and MacDougall was third as they led the Gaels team to a silver medal. (Photo courtesy APShutter.com)

A quick roundup of Queen’s Gaels athletes and teams in action over the weekend:

CROSS COUNTRY

The Queen’s Gaels women's cross country team finished with a team U SPORTS silver medal thanks to the second and third overall performances from Claire Sumner and Branna MacDougall on a wet Sunday in Victoria, B.C. Eric Wynands led the men’s team placing seventh and helping the team finish in fifth place.

The women’s cross country team finished with two of the top three podium positions as Sumner took the silver medal in a time of 27:45.95 and MacDougall finished with bronze in a time of 27:50.56. Toronto Varsity Blues runner Sasha Gollish won in a time of 27:36.27.

As a team, the Gaels took the national silver meda. Along with the impressive results from Sumner and MacDougall, the Gaels saw Molly Steer place 25th in 30:06.03, Taylor Sills finish 30th in 30:19.16 and Amy Stephenson placing 32nd in 30:19.35. 

The team finished with a total of 92 points while first-place Toronto had 73. Both Sumner and MacDougall were recognized as first-team All-Canadians with their placings.

On the men’s side, Wynands also earned first-team All-Canadian honours with a time of 31:42.25. Mark Schmidt was 32nd at 32:14.60, Rob Kanko 33rd at 32:15.61, Alex Wilkie was close behind in 35th at 32:16.76, and Brett Crowley was 38th in a time of 32:21.39.

The individual champion was Yves Sikubwabo from Laval and the Guelph Gryphons were the team champions.

MEN’S RUGBY

The Queen's Gaels men’s rugby team capped off an undefeated season with a convincing 62-17 win over the Guelph Gryphons to claim the OUA banner and Turner Trophy.

The Gaels scored early and often in the opening half, as Alex Colborne kicked a penalty goal two minutes in and Kainoa Lloyd added a try for a 10-0 lead.

After a penalty goal by the Gryphons, Dyaln Young, Mhai Rusu and Lloyd added tries to put the Gaels up 29-3 after 40 minutes.

The Gaels kept up the scoring pace in the second half and were up 43-3 before the Gryphons scored a try 60 minutes in. Lloyd later capped off the afternoon for Queen’s with his third try.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The No. 10 Queen’s Gaels (6-2-0-1) defeated the Western Mustangs (4-1-2-1) 4-0 on Sunday as goalie Stephanie Pascal picked up her second shutout of the season with 29 saves.

Hailey Wilson, Katrina Manoukarakis, Addi Halladay and Emily Gervais scored for the Gaels.

On Saturday the Gaels scored a 3-2 shootout victory at Windsor (0-1-6-1) on a clinching goal from Manoukarakis.

The Gaels got goals from Taylor Hicks and Wilson in regulations as Makenzy Arsenault got the win in net.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen’s Gaels (4-3-3) dropped a 4-1 decision to the No. 10 Carleton Ravens (8-1-1) on Saturday night.

After falling behind 2-0 Graem Bron put the Gaels on the board with a powerplay marker but the Ravens replied and added an empty-netter.

On Friday, the Gaels fell 4-2 to the UOIT Ridgebacks (3-5-1). The Gales fell behind early and made it close with goals from Ryan Bloom and Slater Doggett in the third period.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The No. 10 Queen’s Gaels (4-0) took down the Algoma Thunderbirds (0-5) 72-59 to stay undefeated on the season.

Abby Dixon led the way with 15 points and Andrea Primo added nine more. Two-sport athlete Sophie de Goede had eight points in her first game since finishing the rugby season.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (3-1) picked up a road victory over the Algoma Thunderbirds (0-5) 97-89 on Friday.

Jaz Bains once again led all scorers with 33 points. Tanner Graham, Mike Shoveller, and Quinton Gray added 19, 16 and 11 points respectively.

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen's Gaels (3-1) came back from a 2-1 deficit to take down the Waterloo Warriors (3-3) in five sets on Saturday, 19-25, 25-17, 32-34, 25-23 and 15-11.

The Gaels fell behind after a marathon third set that featured a combined 66 points but were able to rally to claim the final two sets. Setter Zane Grossinger recorded an incredible 56 assists in the match and Markus Trence had 27 kills.

On Friday, the Gaels swept the Guelph Gryphons (2-3) in straight sets 25-23, 25-15, 25-16. Trence led the way with 15 kills, two aces and four blocks.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (4-1) picked up an impressive victory on Saturday over the Waterloo Warriors (3-3), winning in four sets, 29-27, 25-17, 22-25, and 25-11.

Olivia Van Baaren had a big night with 20 kills, three aces and three blocks while teammate Shannon Neville added 17 kills.

On Friday the Gaels needed five sets to get past the GuelphGryphons, 25-11, 20-25, 22-25, 25-22, and 15-7.

After falling behind two sets to one, the Gaels rallied to claims the final two sets and the win.

Shannon Neville finished with 14 kills and four aces while Sierra Hardy had 39 assists.

Remembering the 5th Field Company

  • Royal Military College Officer Cadets Malcolm Madower and Andrew Haves, future combat engineers, were among the current military representatives at the Remembrance Day unveiling. (University Communications)
    Royal Military College Officer Cadets Madower and Haves, future combat engineers, were among the current military representatives at the Remembrance Day unveiling. (University Communications)
  • Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, delivers remarks on behalf of the military. The support of the military was key to the construction of this plinth. (University Communications)
    Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, delivers remarks on behalf of the military. The support of the military was key to the construction of this plinth. (University Communications)
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, unveil the monument, which includes a six-page booklet about the 5th Field Company. (University Communications)
    Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, unveil the monument, which includes a six-page booklet about the 5th Field Company. (University Communications)
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, lays a wreath at the unveiling of the 5th Field Company plinth. (University Communications)
    Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, lays a wreath at the unveiling of the 5th Field Company plinth. (University Communications)
  • Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a veteran of the Second World War and member of the 5th Field Company, was present for the unveiling, along with three generations of his family. (University Communications)
    Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a veteran of the Second World War and member of the 5th Field Company, was present for the unveiling, along with three generations of his family. (University Communications)
  • An officer cadet lays a wreath at the First World War Roll of Honour in the Memorial Room, located in the John Deutsch University Centre. (University Communications)
    An officer cadet lays a wreath at the First World War Roll of Honour in the Memorial Room, located in the John Deutsch University Centre. (University Communications)

On Remembrance Day, veterans, serving military personnel, and members of the Queen's community led by Dean of Engineering and Applied Science Kevin Deluzio gathered to honour the victims of conflicts, past and present, and to pay special tribute to a group of Queen's students and faculty who answered the call during both World Wars.

A new monument unveiled on campus on Saturday was dedicated to the men of the 5th Field Company, Royal Canadian Engineers. The group, which comprised Queen’s students and faculty from the school of Mining Engineering, was formed just prior to the First World War, making them the first 'purely university company in Canada'. This unit of engineers was granted official recognition in early 1910. They contributed greatly to Canada’s preparations for the Great War, and men of the company served bravely in both World Wars. Many made the ultimate sacrifice.

Among those joining Queen's for the unveiling of the plinth was Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers; Major-General Sylvain Sirois, the Chief Military Engineer; Colonel Andrew Bassinger, Director of the Royal Canadian Engineers; Principal Kowal of the Royal Military College of Canada; and a number of representatives from the Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Military College. In addition, the university paid tribute to Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a member of the 5th Field Company during the Second World War. Corporal Fields and his family were in attendance at the unveiling, and Corporal Fields was awarded a Canadian Military Engineer Branch Commendation for his tireless work capturing the history of the 5th Field Company.

"It is my hope that this plinth will remind, inform, and spark interest to learn more," says Dean Deluzio. "Standing as it is, in a central location on campus, this plinth will be passed daily by many hundreds of individuals; students, faculty, staff, and visitors. In future, we will incorporate the 5th Field Company into our annual University Remembrance and, as they do today, the flags will be flown at half-mast for the 5th and other members of Queen’s who gave so much in the service of their country, and in the name of freedom."

The monument is located at the intersection of Union Street and Fifth Field Company Lane. This is the second plinth to be unveiled as part of the Queen’s Remembers initiative. Through this initiative, Queen’s is reflecting upon its history in a project to commemorate those who have made a significant and noteworthy contribution to the university. The planning for the Queen’s Remembers initiative was led by Principal Woolf in collaboration with the facilities and university planning teams, University Relations, and those with specific ties to the topics being commemorated. 

The intent of this particular plinth is to remember the sacrifices of the men of the 5th Field Company, many of whom were the same ages as our students, and who unequivocally put others before themselves. Many people contributed to the realization of this memorial, and Dean Deluzio thanked the many supporters including 1 Engineer Support Unit and the Government of Canada.

To learn more about the 5th Field Company, and others from Queen’s who gave their lives in the two World Wars, please visit the Queen's Archives website.

A new street sign was also unveiled on Fifth Field Company Lane. (University Communications)

 

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