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A degree of inspiration

If you’ve ever wanted to meet a hero, or share a world-changing leader’s insights with the Queen’s community, you may want to consider nominating someone for an honorary degree at Queen’s.

Honorary degrees are one of the most prestigious awards given by a university. Recipients are nominated by the university community based on their contribution to the university, the local community, Canadian society, and to the world.

Bill Flanagan, Dean of Law, recounts his recent experience nominating Douglas Cardinal, a prominent Indigenous architect, Order of Canada inductee, and leader in the Indigenous community.

Douglas Cardinal lectures in front of a packed room in Macdonald Hall during his visit to Queen's to receive his honorary degree in March, 2017.
Douglas Cardinal lectures in front of a packed room in Macdonald Hall during his visit to Queen's to receive his honorary degree in March, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Van Overbeke)

“Douglas has had a long and distinguished career, and he’s been a great friend of the school. He’s come to speak to our students about Indigenous legal matters, and gave two lectures while he was in Kingston for the convocation about Indigenous peoples and law in Canada. He has created award-winning and world-renowned buildings, such as the Museum of Civilization in Ottawa and a church in Red Deer, Alberta – a famous building which I attended as a kid, and I was always terribly impressed by its beauty,” he says.

“Nominating honorary degree recipients is of great value, both to recognize their contributions and also as an opportunity to provide inspiration to our graduates,” says Dean Flanagan. “It’s important that these nominees are considered carefully, and be of a certain caliber, like Douglas Cardinal, who has been a tremendous leader in his field.”

The Senate Honorary Degree Committee approves nominees from the applications, and may award a Doctor of Divinity, Laws, or Science to the successful recipients.

Richard Reznick, Dean of Health Sciences, has nominated many honorary degree recipients over the years, and recounts one of his most memorable.

Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, honorary degree recipient, delivers a moving speech at the School of Medicine Class of 2011 convocation. (Photo: Jackie Duffin)
Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, honorary degree recipient, delivers a moving speech at the School of Medicine Class of 2011 convocation. (Photo: Jackie Duffin)

“The very first recipient that I nominated was Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish. He is a Canadian-Palestinian doctor who lived in Palestine but trained in Israel as an obstetrician, and had a lot of connections in the Israeli community. During one of the severe conflicts, where there were a lot of bombings, he had a tragedy that killed three of his children, his niece, and injured another child. He became world-famous for writing a book, I Shall Not Hate, which promoted using conflict and tragedy to foster understanding between sides on serious – in this case, thousands of years long – conflicts,” says Dr. Reznick. “When he gave his convocation speech, not only did he get a standing ovation, but he had everyone in tears.”

Both Deans would recommend the experience to anyone in the Queen’s community.

“I’ve made it a habit to nominate someone every year,” says Dr. Reznick. “It’s really about honouring the nominee, and inspiring our students, but it also gives Queen’s a chance to affiliate with these world-famous people, and create a connection.”

“Of course,” says Dean Flanagan. “For my nomination of Douglas, I wanted to both recognize and thank him for his contribution to our school, speaking to our students, participating in our Indigenous art project, and providing a voice for Indigenous people in the law school.”

You don’t have to be a Dean to nominate someone for an honorary degree. Anyone from the Kingston or Queen’s community may nominate a person they believe has made remarkable contributions to the lives of others throughout the world, in academia, business, politics, scientific research, and the arts.

The committee invites nominations for honorary degrees to all who qualify, including women, Aboriginal persons, visible minorities/racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.

The selection process begins after all nominations are submitted, when the committee meets to review the nominations and make recommendations. The Senate then approves the recommendations in April, and invitations to candidates for both the fall and winter convocations are sent over the summer. In fall, the list of honorees are made public.

Applications are open through the University Secretariat to nominate an individual or group for an honorary degree for fall and winter of 2019. The deadline is March 1, 2018 to submit nomination forms.

AMS and Queen’s mark Sexual Violence Awareness Week with 'Unfounded' talk

Robyn Doolittle, Globe & Mail reporter and author of a series of articles about how police handle sexual assault cases, visited Queen’s as part of Sexual Violence Awareness Week.

Robyn Doolittle presents as part of Sexual Violence Awareness Week. (Photo by Iain Sherriff-Scott)

A group of students attended a talk from an award-winning journalist earlier this week as part of Sexual Violence Awareness Week. Robyn Doolittle of The Globe & Mail walked the students through her investigation into how police have responded to, and in some cases dismissed, allegations of sexual assault.

The “Unfounded” series in the national newspaper was the culmination of a 20-month exploration of the sexual assault cases categorized by police forces across the country as 'unfounded'. The series sparked a national conversation on what it can mean be a survivor or victim of sexual violence in the justice system and how our institutions engage with a culture of sexual violence.

“I think Robyn’s keynote allowed us such an interesting and new insight into what it is like to be a survivor in the law enforcement system,” says Ramna Safeer, the Alma Mater Society’s Social Issues Coordinato. “Her talk was a foot in the door of nuanced conversations of the complex, multifaceted experiences of survivors and the systemic issue of sexual violence.”

Sexual Violence Awareness Week is a survivor-centric glimpse at the important sexual violence prevention and education that happens on campuses like Queen’s. Ms. Safeer, the Alma Mater Society’s Social Issues Coordinator, says she hopes this week, and this presentation, contribute to a more survivor-centric approach to this work.

The event was well received by attendees. PhD candidate Morgan Oddie attended the talk and said she was pleased to see changes in the way police approach sexual assault which came about as a result of Ms. Doolittle’s reporting.

The presentation was hosted by the Bystander Intervention Training Program, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Coordinator Barbara Lotan, and the AMS’ Mental Health Awareness Committee (MHAC).

To read the first story in Ms. Doolittle’s series, visit The Globe & Mail’s website.

Innovation and Wellness Centre construction to affect sidewalk, Union Street, QUIC, blue light Nov. 27–Dec. 1

Work will continue on the Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) project during the week of November 27, with additional pre-cast concrete panels being hoisted onto the west side of the building.

To accommodate this work, there will be traffic disruptions in front of the site between Monday, November 27 to Friday, December 1:

  • The sidewalk in front of the IWC will be closed.
  • Parking in front of the IWC will be inaccessible.
  • There will be detours in place on Union Street near the IWC.
  • The emergency telephone (blue light) at the southeast corner of the John Deutsch University Centre will be removed from service.

Additionally, the Queen’s University International Centre's (QUIC's) Churchill Room will be closed as a safety precaution between Monday, November 27 to Friday, December 1 while the panels are being hoisted.

Work is expected to conclude each day by 6 pm, at which time the restrictions will be lifted until the following day.

For more information, contact Fixit at ext. 77301 or by email.

Aboriginal leaders, mental health advocate among QUAA award recipients

QUAA Awards

Two champions of Aboriginal issues, a mental health advocate, and a rising media star are among this year’s recipients of the Queen’s University Alumni Association (QUAA) Awards

Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University co-chair and former Trent University Native Studies professor Marlene Brant Castellano (Arts’55, LLD’91), Queen’s Director of Indigenous Initiatives Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) (B.Ed.’99), The Jack Project founder Eric Windeler (Com’82, LLD’15), and Buzzfeed Canada editor Elamin Abdelmahmoud (Artsci’11), are being honoured for being leaders in their field and for their support of the university.

“Queen’s would not be the university it is today without the tireless work of its staff, alumni, and volunteers. The Awards Gala is a chance to acknowledge these dedicated people and give them the recognition they deserve,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf (Artsci’80).

Dr. Brant Castellano is the recipient of the Alumni Achievement Award, the highest honour bestowed by the QUAA. The member of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte is a leader in Aboriginal education and research who has dedicated her life to the rights and well-being of Indigenous people. She has served on many government and academic research committees. She retired from Trent in 1996 but continues to work on reconciliation between Aboriginal people and all Canadians, including the Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Task Force

The other recipients being honoured at the awards gala are:

  • John Allingham, professor in Biomedical and Molecular Sciences – Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching: Dr. Allingham has received praise from his students for his dedication to teaching and going above and beyond. He is not the type of teacher who stands in front of the classroom and talks for an hour. He believes in active learning. He creates eye-catching videos and brings in props to help explain complex topics. He also spends countless hours working with students outside the classroom on projects such as the Queen’s Genetically Engineered Machine Team (QGEM).
  • Eric Windeler (Com’82, LLD’15) – Alumni Humanitarian Award: Mr. Windeler is a mental health advocate who founded The Jack Project in 2010 with his wife, Sandra Hanington, after their son, Jack, died by suicide while in his first year studying at Queen’s. Mr. Windeler quickly built The Jack Project into a national organization that works directly with student leaders to develop initiatives to improve mental wellbeing on campuses across Canada.
  • Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) (B.Ed.’99) – Alumni Mentorship Award: Kanonhsyonne is the former director of the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre who was recently named the inaugural Director of Indigenous Initiatives at Queen’s. She has been a long-time advocate for Indigenous students at Queen’s and in the Kingston community. She has spent countless hours on committees and working with staff and administrators to develop a welcoming and supportive environment for Indigenous students.  
  • Sue Bates (Artsci’91) – Herbert J. Hamilton Volunteer Service Award): Ms. Bates has inspired many alumni and volunteers with her overwhelming love of all things tricolour. She has a long history of volunteering for both Queen’s and the alumni association. The former University Council member launched an alumni branch in Turks & Caicos in 1999 when she lived in the Caribbean country. When she returned to Kingston, she continued to volunteer with the local branch, eventually becoming Kingston Branch President. She is currently the president of the QUAA.
  • London UK Branch – Initiative of the Year Award: The branch hosted a talk with track star Stef Reid (Artsci’06). It helped more than 100 alumni reconnect with Queen’s and deepen tricolour pride as the World Para Athletics long jump champion inspired everyone with her story of how she went from Queen’s to the Paralympic Games.   
  • Elamin Abdelmahmoud (Artsci’11) – One to Watch Award: Mr. Abdelmahmoud has come a long way since his days as news director at CFRC and has emerged as a rising Canadian media star. He is currently an editor at Buzzfeed Canada and is a regular panelist and contributor on CBC’s The National.
  • Jasmit De Saffel – (Artsci’17) Outstanding Student Award: Ms. De Saffel excelled both academically and as a volunteer with various Queen’s organizations. She served on the Queen’s University Senate and held various positions with the Queen’s Student Alumni Association, Alma Mater Society, Residence Society, and Queen’s Journal. All her efforts earned her an Ontario Volunteer Service Award from the provincial government.
  • Edmond Chan (Artsci’97) ­– Marsha Lampman Branch Volunteer Award: Mr. Chan has been volunteering with the Hong Kong Branch of the QUAA for more than 20 years and was instrumental in helping coordinate the Queen’s 175th Celebrations in Hong Kong in May 2017.
  • Julia Reid (Artsci’08) – Rising Star Volunteer Award: Ms. Reid is currently the president of the New York City Branch. She has been working hard to build the alumni community in the Big Apple by recruiting new volunteers to the Branch executive and hosting about a dozen events over the past two years.

The awards will be handed out at the QUAA Gala Dinner on April 7, 2018.

Queen's United Way campaign closes in on 90 per cent of goal

United Way ThermometerThe Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

To date, the campaign has reached $283,804 or 88.6 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

All-stars in sport and the classroom

  • Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, left, and Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney helped recognize Nixon Academic Leadership Award winners, from second left: Erin Lee, Sam Dobbin, Ejaz Causer, Emily Gervais.
    Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, left, and Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney helped recognize Nixon Academic Leadership Award winners, from second left: Erin Lee, Sam Dobbin, Ejaz Causer, Emily Gervais.
  • A new Academic Leadership Award was presented to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes. From left: Varsity Leadership Counicl Co-Presidents Andrea Priamo and Mike Shoveller and award winners Shelbie Rayner-Murphy and Lloyd MacPherson.
    A new Academic Leadership Award was presented to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes. From left: Varsity Leadership Counicl Co-Presidents Andrea Priamo and Mike Shoveller and award winners Shelbie Rayner-Murphy and Lloyd MacPherson.
  • A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year, during Wednesday morning's breakfast event at Grant Hall.
    A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year, during Wednesday morning's breakfast event at Grant Hall.

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation honoured the 2016-17 Academic All-Stars at a breakfast reception held Wednesday morning in Grant Hall.

A total of 360 varsity student-athletes were recognized as Academic All-Stars, having earned at least a 3.5 grade-point average over the past academic year at Queen’s. The breakfast event marks the sixth year Athletics and Recreation has undertaken this initiative to honour the academic and athletic excellence of its student-athletes.

“We are so fortunate to have each and every one of you at Queen’s," Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney said to those in attendance. “Because of your hard work and dedication to both academic and athletic pursuits, we are consistently among the top five schools for the number of Academic All-Stars each year. I believe this reflects our goal of recruiting the very best student-athletes who are performing at the highest level, both in the classroom and on the field of play – and it reflects our commitment to providing you with the encouragement, support and resources that you need to excel.”

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon and Executive Director of Athletics and Recreation Leslie Dal Cin were also on hand to speak to the student-athletes and congratulate them on their success.

The Nixon Academic Leadership Award was given out to the male and female athletes from both the varsity teams and clubs who have exemplified achievement in academics, community service and fair play in their sport. This year's recipients of the Nixon Award are: Erin Lee (Women’s Swimming); Sam Dobbin (Men’s Triathlon); Emily Gervais (Women’s Hockey); and Ejaz Causer (Football). These awards are named in honour of Gord and Janet Nixon, two extraordinary benefactors to Athletics and Recreation.

A new Academic Leadership Award was presented this year to male and female Pathways to Education high school student-athletes who have demonstrated commitment, discipline, resilience, leadership and a positive attitude in combining academic achievement and athletic performance. This year’s recipients were Lloyd MacPherson and Shelbie Rayner-Murphy.

Last week Queen’s Athletics & Recreation announced its student-led Varsity Leadership Council have partnered with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students. The partnership will also see Queen's Gaels Varsity Leadership Council host a group of Pathways students at Queen’s for a day to participate in activities, have lunch, and talk about what university and life as a student-athlete are like.

Approximately 41 per cent of Queen’s student-athletes were named Academic All-Stars this year. The varsity clubs with the highest GPAs were triathlon and track and field, while the women’s and men’s soccer teams recorded the highest team GPAs.

Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette now available

Nov. 21 Gazette
Read the Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette online.

The Nov. 21 edition of the Gazette, the final edition of the fall term, is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus, as well as a number of off-campus locations.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • Photos of Fall Convocation including all four honorary degree recipients and a special article on Bruce Jameson, who received a degree from Queen’s more than 70 years after attending the university.
  • An article highlighting the Learning Outcomes Assessment project and the next steps.
  • An article introducing Vanessa Yzaguire, the Division of Students Affairs’ first diversity and inclusion coordinator .
  • A feature on the unveiling of a Queen’s Remembers plinth in honour of the Fifth Field Company and its members.
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will be published Jan. 9, 2018. However, new articles are posted daily at the Gazette Online.

Follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Pathways partnership connects Gaels with local students

Athletics and Recreation and its student-led Varsity Leadership Council are partnering with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students.
A new partnership between Athletics and Recreation, the Varsity Leadership Council and Pathways to Education will create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students. From left: Allyson Tonelli, Assistant Manager, Marketing, Communications and Events - Queen's Athletics; Roger Romero, Interim Coordinator, Tutoring and Mentoring Programs – Pathways to Education; Andrea Priamo, Varsity Leadership Co-President - Women's Basketball; Leslie Dal Cin, Executive Director, Athletics and Recreation. 

Queen’s Athletics and Recreation and its student-led Varsity Leadership Council are partnering with Pathways to Education to create mentorship and educational opportunities for local high school students.

“These new initiatives in Athletics and Recreation build on the university’s longstanding outreach activities with local community groups,” says Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs Ann Tierney. “We are particularly excited about the engagement of our student-athletes as role models who can help area youth see that post-secondary education is possible.” 

The partnership will see the Varsity Leadership Council host a group of Pathways students at Queen’s for a day to participate in activities, have lunch, and talk about what university and life as a student-athlete are like. Queen’s will also host selected Pathways participants at several home games over the course of the year, and donate gently-used equipment to Pathways each year, allowing more youth the opportunity to be involved in sport and physical activity. In addition, a male and female Pathways student will be recognized with Academic All-Star Awards for success both in the classroom and on the field of play.

“When it comes to the Pathways organization, we share many of the same values around the importance of education, wellness and physical activity as contributors to personal and professional success,” says Leslie Dal Cin, Executive Director, Queen’s Athletics and Recreation. “Not only can our student-athletes act as mentors for these high school students, they can learn from them about goal setting, resilience and overcoming obstacles.”

Pathways to Education is a national organization that aims to break the cycle of poverty through education, and provides the resources and network of support for our students to graduate from high school and build the foundation for a successful future. The Kingston Pathways to Education program is run by Kingston Community Health Centres (KCHC).

“We are thrilled with our partnership with Queen’s Athletics and Recreation. Access to recreation and positive role models are critical to healthy outcomes for our youth,” says Roger Romero, Interim Coordinator, Tutoring and Mentoring Programs, Pathways to Education. “Queen's University is a long-standing academic partner of KCHC Pathways to Education. Many of our students choose Queen's as their post-secondary pathway, and this is a wonderful opportunity for our students to experience everything Queen’s University can offer.”

The Division of Student Affairs has been working with Pathways programs across Ontario for many years, visiting with youth, helping with university applications, offering free transportation to Fall Preview and summer orientation programs, and providing renewable entrance awards for Pathways participants. The university has developed a new first generation admission policy, and hiring is now underway for a new full-time GTA-based recruiter who will focus on students from under-represented populations, including racialized and first generation students. 

For more information about Pathways to Education, visit the website.

 

Queen’s engineering grad named Rhodes Scholar

Iain Sander
Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar. The Chemical Engineering graduate is the 58th Rhodes Scholar from Queen's. (Supplied Image)

Queen’s University graduate Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar.

Mr. Sander, who studied Chemical Engineering at Queen’s, is the university’s 58th Rhodes Scholar and will begin his studies at Oxford University next fall.

The Rhodes Scholarships are considered the oldest and most prestigious international scholarships for outstanding scholars from any academic field of study.

“It is a tremendous honour to have been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar, and I am very grateful to everyone in Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the Queen’s community who has supported me throughout the application process,” says Mr. Sander, who is currently studying medicine at the University of Alberta. “I have been fortunate to learn from world-class professors who have consistently challenged me academically and supported me in pursuit my research interests. Queen’s University will always hold a special place in my heart and I am very grateful for relationships I developed and the intellectual and personal growth I experienced during my undergraduate career.”

Mr. Sander graduated from Queen’s with first class honours in Chemical Engineering earlier this year. He received the Medal in Chemical Engineering and the Society for Chemical Industry Merit Award in recognition of achieving the highest standing in his discipline.

At Oxford, he plans to study orthopaedic biomechanics to help improve the health, lives, and independence of individuals with disabilities.

“On behalf of Queen’s University, I am pleased to congratulate Iain on this tremendous accomplishment and opportunity,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf. “I am confident that at Oxford he will apply the skills and experience he has gained at Queen’s, as well as through his years of leadership and community service, to further his contributions to society. I have no doubt he will thrive as a Rhodes Scholar.”

During his time at Queen’s, Mr. Sander volunteered extensively on campus and in the Kingston community, coaching the local Special Olympics swim team, mentoring first-year engineering design teams as they worked on award-winning adaptive buoyancy devices, and tutoring peers in English.

Mr. Sander, who grew up in Lethbridge, Alta., was a Loran Scholar and a recipient of the Queen’s Chancellor’s Scholarship. As part of the Loran Scholar program he spent his community development summer in France as a live-in assistant with L’Arche, an organization for people with intellectual disabilities.

This is the second straight Rhodes Scholar for Queen’s after Claire Gummo, a Political Studies and Gender Studies student, received the prestigious scholarship in 2017.

Funded by the estate of Cecil J. Rhodes (the Rhodes Trusts), 11 Rhodes Scholars are selected each year from across Canada to outstanding students who demonstrate a strong propensity to emerge as “leaders for the world’s future.”

The scholarships to Oxford University are for postgraduate studies or a second bachelor’s degree and cover tuition and fees and provides a stipend to help cover living expenses for two to three years of study while at Oxford.

Learn more about the 2018 Rhodes Scholars.

A holistic view of wellness

The Innovation and Wellness Centre will unite health and wellness resources under one roof.

Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Students walking into the Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) next fall may find themselves spending a lot of time in the space.

In addition to being a hub for innovation and entrepreneurship resources, and academic labs and classrooms for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the IWC will be a place where students maintain and build upon their positive physical and mental health and wellness.

“Physical and mental well-being are important preconditions for academic success,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean (Student Affairs). “This new facility will provide Queen’s with the flexibility to meet the rising demand across the spectrum of wellness services. Co-locating services that support wellness will emphasize to our students the important relationships that connect mental health, physical well-being, and academic success.”

The creation of the IWC was made possible through $55 million in philanthropic support, including $40 million to revitalize the facility and $15 million specifically earmarked for student wellness and academic programming. In addition, the federal and Ontario governments contributed a combined total of nearly $22 million to this facility.

The IWC will house modernized facilities for Student Wellness Services, configured so that physicians, nurses, and counsellors all share the same space. The main floor will also be home to Queen’s Student Accessibility Services and a new health promotion hub.

“Our hope is that the revitalized, more central location of our services will better engage students in health-promoting activities,” says Jennifer Dods, Executive Director, Student Wellness Services. “The biggest change for us will be a greater integration of our services, which will be noticeable from the moment you walk in the door. Our new space in the IWC will feature one shared reception for our services, which will mean one point of entry and less stigma for students accessing counselling, health, or accessibility supports.”

The IWC will also include an expanded interfaith chaplaincy, the Queen’s University International Centre, refreshed athletics training space including the three existing gyms, the Student Community Relations office, and a new Examination Centre to support faculties and schools. University Registrar John Metcalfe notes the number of accommodated exams and midterms continues to rise each year.

“As we prepare for the move to the new centre, we are taking the opportunity to refresh our business processes, moving away from paper forms in favour of an online system,” says Dr. Metcalfe. “Between these changes, and the co-location of the Examination Centre with other wellness services, the process of securing an accommodation for an exam will be much less stressful for all involved. The intent is to create clarity on where to go, and offer a streamlined process for accommodations for both graduate and undergraduate students.”

The Examination Centre will include 70 private and semi-private rooms with adjustable desks; some will offer computers and specialized software. There will be no carpeting or fluorescent lighting, meaning students with light sensitivities or allergies can write without distraction, and some private rooms will be soundproofed for those who need to speak while writing.

The Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) is also looking ahead to the move. The QUIC team, currently located in the John Deutsch University Centre, has a front row seat during the ongoing construction. While there have been some noise issues, Director Jyoti Kotecha (MPA'03) says it will all be worth it once the team is in the new space, which features a larger kitchen and adds some meeting rooms.

“Our new space and its proximity to other Student Affairs services will make it easier to work collaboratively with partners such as the Peer Health Educators and the Chaplaincy,” says Ms. Kotecha. “Though the space is comparable in size, it is better laid out and offers us some room to grow, in alignment with the growth of international enrolment at Queen’s.”

Another group making the big move next door will be the Office of the Interfaith Chaplaincy. Chaplain Kate Johnson says the new space includes a dedicated quiet room for prayer or meditation, a lounge area, and an additional office which will be shared by the office’s three part-time chaplains.

“This additional room will offer us more flexibility and, coupled with the new staff, should allow us to expand popular programs like our “Cooking with Grans” offering,” says Ms. Johnson. “Moving the Chaplaincy into the Innovation and Wellness Centre will also reunite us with more Student Wellness services, better serving students in the process.”

The Innovation and Wellness Centre’s grand opening is planned for fall 2018. 

Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

 

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