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The beauty of research

Calling all photographers, amateur and professional! The third edition of the Queen’s Art of Research photo contest is officially open.

The contest’s goal is to creatively capture the research process across disciplines and demonstrate the importance of research at the local, national and international levels. This year’s contest is open to faculty, staff, students and alumni, and encourages researchers in any discipline to showcase their research in action.

Everyone is encouraged to think creatively; the only limit is your imagination. Photos can come anywhere from across the globe to the lens of a microscope. The 2015 and 2016 contests gave Queen’s many inspiring images of the research happening across the institution.

Images will be featured on the Queen’s Research webpage, and will be used in various Queen’s research promotion materials. Photo credit will be given where possible.

There are four categories to submit an image to this year: Community Collaborations, Invisible Discoveries, Out in the Field, and Art in Action. The winner in each category will receive a prize of $500.

Also, there are two other $500 prizes available this year. One prize will be for People’s Choice, which will be determined by an online vote from members of the Queen’s community. The other prize will be for Best Description, which will be given to the most creative image caption.

The contest closes on Jan. 31, 2018 at 4 pm. Please visit the Art of Research website for more information, and get snapping.

  • Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory. The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. The internal morphology of tiny specimens can be seen/observed using a special staining technique. This method digests the muscles, making them transparent, and colours the bones and cartilages. In the case of this froglet, it has a body size of around 18mm, and features like osteoderms i
    Tulugak on the Crucifix. Norman Vorano. Faculty, Art History & Art Conservation. Location: Pond Inlet, Nunavut. Dr. Norman Vorano was conducting historical research with Inuit elders in Nunavut in April and May of 2016. One woman recounted the loss of cultural traditions as a result of the changes that happened during the twentieth century, particularly from residential schools, the missionaries, and the waves of southerners who flooded into the Arctic after the Second World War. After they broke for lunch, Vorano stepped outside. The white sky was indistinguishable from the ground. He walked past a towering crucifix erected behind the Catholic Church, on an imposing hill overlooking the community. A raven flew down from the ethereal sky, perched on the Crucifix, and began vocalizing. For Western culture, the raven is a harbinger of death. For Inuit culture, tulugak – raven – is a tricky fellow that symbolizes creation.
  • Window on a Window to the Universe. Mark Chen. Faculty, Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy. Location: SNOLAB, Sudbury, Ontario. An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-metre diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down (foreground), and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector.
    Window on a Window to the Universe. Mark Chen. Faculty, Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy. Location: SNOLAB, Sudbury, Ontario. An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-metre diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down (foreground), and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector. The water-air interface inside and outside the acrylic spherical tank creates visual distortions as light refracts at the optical boundary. Once full, the upgraded detector turns on in Fall 2016, ten years after the original SNO detector completed its Nobel-prize winning studies.
  • Aldonza. Tim Fort. Faculty, Dan School of Drama & Music. Location: Mainstage, Weston Playhouse, Vermont.
    Aldonza. Tim Fort. Faculty, Dan School of Drama & Music. Location: Mainstage, Weston Playhouse, Vermont. This moment arrives at the end of the staging for the musical number "Aldonza" from The Man of La Mancha – one of two musicals Dr. Tim Fort directed at the Weston Playhouse in Vermont in the summer of 2016. Many of the show's creative team are Broadway veterans, including the designer and the performer playing Aldonza – whose character is pictured ignoring the aggressions of the muleteers as they sing to her in this musical version of the Don Quixote story. Dr. Fort’s research interests lie in lighting and staging, and he has been a producing director at the Weston Playhouse for the past 30 years.
  • Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory.
    Amphibian from the Inside. Rute Clemente Carvalho. Postdoc, Biology. Location: Zeiss stereomicroscope in the laboratory. The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. The internal morphology of tiny specimens can be seen/observed using a special staining technique. This method digests the muscles, making them transparent, and colours the bones and cartilages. In the case of this froglet, it has a body size of around 18mm, and features like osteoderms in the skin and hyperossification on the skeleton can be observed. The knowledge of morphological structures can help researchers understand the evolution of the species’ behaviour and ecology of the species, and its phylogenetic relationships with related species.