A Bibliography of Thomas De Quincey

Nineteenth-Century Scholarship

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Anonymous. “Review of The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey.The Athenaeum 23 Dec. 1893: 873-74.

---. “Causes Célèbres XXIII: No. 29 Ratcliffe Highway.” The Green Bag 3 (1891): 134-37.

---. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” The Saturday Review 16 May 1885: 660-61.

---. “Masson’s De Quincey.” The Saturday Review 17 Dec. 1881: 763-64.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The London Quarterly and Holburn Review 49 (1877): 35-74.

---. “Review of Thomas De Quincey: His Life and Writing.The British Quarterly Review 66 (1877): 415-33.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Saturday Review 2 Jun. 1877: 675-76.

---. “De Quincey.” The New Quarterly Magazine Jul. 1875: 257-87.

---. “Review of The Works of De Quincey.National Quarterly Review 22 (1870): 71-88.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” Sharpe’s London Magazine 49 (1869): 300-14.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Eclectic Review 15 (1868): 95-118.

---. Mancuniensis. "Thomas De Quincey." Notes and Queries. 3rd Series. 6 (1864): 125.

---. “Review of The Works of De Quincey.The British Quarterly Review, 38 (1863): 1-29.

---. “Review of The Works of De Quincey.” in Littell’s Living Age, 66 (21 Jul. 1860): 151-54

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Athenaeum 17 Dec. 1859: 814-15.

---. "Death of Thomas De Quincey." The Times 14 Dec. 1859: 6.

---. “Death of Thomas De Quincey.” The Scotsman 10 Dec. 1859: 6.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Gentleman’s Magazine 96 (1857): 107-14.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The London Quarterly Review 8 (1857): 198-219.

---. “De Quincey’s Miscellanies.Colburn’s New Monthly Magazine 105 (1855): 87-90.

---. “Review of Selections Grave and Gay.The Eclectic Review, New Series 8 (1854): 385-99.

---. “Thomas De Quincey and his Works.” Hogg’s Instructor 3 (1854): 1-15.

---. “De Quincey’s Miscellanies.Colburn’s New Monthly Magazine 101 (1854): 338-43.

---. “Life and Adventures of an Opium-Eater.” The Dublin University Magazine43 (1854): 331-454.

---. “Life and Adventures of an Opium-Eater.” The Dublin University Magazine 43 (1854): 409-25.

---. “Thomas De Quincey and his Works.” The Westminster Review 61 (1854): 275-84.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Eclectic Review 27 (1852): 565-69.

---. "Mr De Quincy [sic] and the London University." The Atheneaum 61. 24 Dec. 1828: 969.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The United States Literary Gazette 1 (1825): 38-40.

---. “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The North American Review 18 (1824): 90-8.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The Eclectic Review New Series, 19 (1823): 366-71.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The Monthly Review 100 (1823): 288-96.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The New Edinburgh Review 4 (1823): 253-74.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The Imperial Magazine 5 (1823): 89-95.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The British Review and London Critical Journal 20 (1822): 474-89.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The Gentleman’s Magazine 92, Part 2 (1822): 447.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The European Magazine and London Review 82 (1822): 459-60.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The British Critic New Series, 18 (1822): 531-34.

---. “Review of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.The Album 2 (1822): 177-207.

Bain, Joseph. "Thomas De Quincey and his Supposed Descent from the Earls of Winchester." The Genealogist New Series 7 (1890): 17-21.

Bayne, Peter. “Thomas De Quincey and his Works.” Essays in Biography and Criticism. 2 vols. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1857. 1: 15-49.

Calkins, Alonzo. Opium and the Opium Appetite. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1871. 90-92.

Cottle, Joseph. Early Recollections; Chiefly Relating to the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 2 vols. London: Longman, 1837. 1: 124-131.

De Quincey, Thomas. The Opium Eater and Essays by Thomas De Quincey. Ed. Richard Le Gallienne. London: Ward, Lock & Co., 1898.

---. The Posthumous Works. Ed. A. H. Japp. 2 vols. London: Heinemann, 1891-93.

---. De Quincey Memorials. Ed. A. H. Japp. 2 vols. London: Heinemann, 1891.

---. The Uncollected Writings. Ed. James Hogg. 2 vols. London: Swan Sonnenschein, 1890.

---. The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey. Ed. David Masson. 14 vols. Edinburgh: A. and C. Black, 1889-90.

Espinasse, Francis. “Thomas De Quincey.” Lancashire Worthies. Second Edition. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1877. 378-461.

Findlay, John Ritchie. Personal Recollections of Thomas De Quincey. Edinburgh: Black, 1886.

Garnett, Richard. “Introduction.” Confessions of an English Opium-Eater. Ed. Richard Garnett. London: Kegan Paul, 1885. vii-xxii.

---. “De Quincey and De Musset.” Confessions of an English Opium-Eater. Ed. Richard Garnett. London: Kegan Paul, 1885. 169-88.

Gilfillan, George. “Thomas De Quincey.” A Gallery of Literary Portraits. Edinburgh: Tait, 1845. 154-163.

Gillies, Robert Pearse. “Mr De Quincey.” Memoirs of a Literary Veteran. 3 vols. London: Bentley, 1851. 2: 218-21.

Gillman, James. The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. London: Pickering, 1838. 240-56.

Griswold, Hattie Tyng. “Thomas De Quincey.” Home Life of Great Authors. Chicago: McClurg, 1886. 54-63.

Hamley, E. B. “A Recent Confession of an Opium-Eater.” Blackwood’s Magazine 80 (1856): 629-36.

Hare, Julius Charles. “Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the English Opium-Eater.” The British Magazine 7 (1835): 15-27.

Hogg, James, ed. De Quincey and his Friends. London: Sampson Low, Marston and Co., 1895.

---. "Night and Days with De Quincey." Harper's New Monthly Magazine 80 (1890): 446-56.

Ingram, J. H. “Thomas De Quincey: His Life and Writings, by A. J. Japp.” International Review 4 (1877): 647-62.

Japp, A. H. Thomas De Quincey: His Life and Writings. Revised Edition. London: Hogg, 1890.

---. Thomas De Quincey: His Life and Writings. 2 vols. New York: Scribner, 1877.

Kebbel, T. E. “Selections Grave and Gay, by Thomas De Quincey.” The Quarterly Review 110 (1861): 1-35.

Landreth, Peter."Emerson's Meeting with De Quincey." Blackwood's Magazine 155 (1894): 480-91.

Lathrop, George Parsons. “Some Aspects of De Quincey.” The Atlantic Monthly 40 (1877): 569-84.

Le Gallienne, Richard. "Introduction." The Opium Eater and Essays by Thomas De Quincey. Ed. Richard Le Gallienne. London: Ward, Lock & Co., 1898. vii-xxv.

Maginn, William. “The Humbugs of the Age. No. 1.” John Bull Magazine and Literary Recorder 1 (1824): 21-4.

Mackay, Charles. “Professor J. P. Nichol and Thomas De Quincey.” Forty Years' Recollection of Life, Literature, and Public Affairs from 1830 to 1870. London: Chapman and Hall, 1877. 1: 313-26.

Masson, David. "Editor's Preface." The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey. Ed. David Masson. 14 vols. Edinburgh: A. and C. Black, 1889-90.

---. De Quincey. London: Macmillan, 1881.

Moir, David Macbeth. “De Quincey’s Revenge.” Blackwood’s Magazine 48 (1840): 578-86.

Nicoll, Henry J. Landmarks of English Literature. London: Hogg, 1883. 360-65.

Nisbet, Thomas. Catalogue of an extensive and valuable collection of books... including the library of the late Thomas De Quincey, Esq. Edinburgh: Nisbet, 1860. 36-48.

Oliphant, Margaret. “The Opium Eater.” Blackwood’s Magazine 122 (1877): 717-41.

Proctor, Bryan Waller. An Autobiographical Fragment and Biographical Notes. London: Bell, 1877. 212-14.

Rae-Brown, Colin. “A Reminiscence of De Quincey.” Universal Review 5 (1889): 393-400.

Stephen, Leslie. "The Decay of Murder." The Cornhill Magazine 20 (Dec. 1869): 722-33.

Stirling, James Hutchinson. “De Quincey and Coleridge Upon Kant.” Fortnightly Review, New Series 10 (1868): 377-97.

Thompson, Francis. “A Monument of Personality.” The Academy 56 (1899): 478-79.

Vincens, Cécile. “Essaies de littérature pathologique. II. L’Opium -- Thomas De Quincey.” Revue des deux mondes 138 (1896): 116-46.

Watts, Theodore. “’The Fatal Marksman.’” The Athenaeum 2830 (21 Jan. 1882): 92.

Woodhouse, Richard. “Notes of Conversation with Thomas De Quincey.” Confessions of an English Opium-Eater. Ed. Richard Garnett. London: Kegan Paul, 1885. 191-233.

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Twentieth-Century Scholarship

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Abrams, M. H. The Milk of Paradise: The Effects of Opium Visions on the Works of De Quincey, Crabbe, Francis Thompson, and Coleridge. New York: Harper & Row, 1962.

Adams, Robert Martin. “Sénancour, Novalis, De Quincey: Equivocal Romantics.” Nil: Episodes in the Literary Conquest of the Void during the Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1966. 17-38.

Appleman, Philip. “D. H. Lawrence and the Intrusive Knock.” Modern Fiction Studies 3 (1958): 328-32.

Axon, William E. A. “De Quincey and Coleridge.” Notes and Queries. 11th series. 2 (1910): 228.

---. "Thomas De Quincey." The Bookman 31 (1907): 207-12.

---. "Some De Quincey Documents." The Manchester Guardian 10 Dec. 1900: 10.

Barrell, John. The Infection of Thomas De Quincey. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991.

Bate, Jonathan. “The Literature of Power: Coleridge and De Quincey.” Coleridge’s Visionary Languages. Ed. Tim Fulford and Morton D. Paley. Bury St. Edmonds: Brewer, 1993. 137-50.

Baxter, Edmund. De Quincey’s Art of Autobiography. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1990.

Beer, John. “The Englishness of De Quincey’s Ideas.” English and German Romanticism: Cross-Currents and Controversies. Ed. James Pipkin. Heidelberg: Winter, 1985. 323-47.

---. "De Quincey and the Dark Sublime: The Wordsworth-Coleridge Ethos." Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985.

Benjamin, Walter. "Critique of Violence." Reflections: Essays, Aphorisms, Autobiographical Writings. Ed. Peter Demeta, trans. Edmund Jephcott. New York: Schocken Books, 1986. 277-300.

Berridge, Viriginia and Edwards, Gritffith. Opium and the People: Opium Use in Nineteenth-Century England. London: Allen Lane, 1981.

Black, Joel. The Aesthetics of Murder: A Study in Romantic Literature and Contemporary Culture. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.

---. “Confession, Digression, Gravitation: Thomas De Quincey’s German Connection.” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 308-37.

Blakemore, Steven. "De Quincey's Transubstantiation of Opium in the Confessions." Massachusetts Studies in English 9 (1984): 32-41.

Booth, Martin. Opium: A History. London: Simon and Schuster, 1996.

Breton, André. "Thomas De Quincey" Anthology of Black Humour. Trans. Mark Polizzotti. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1997. 53-58.

Brown, Calvin. "The Musical Structure of De Quincey's Dream-Fugue." Musical Quarterly 24 (1938): 341-50.

Bruss, Elizabeth. “Thomas De Quincey: Sketches and Sighs.” Autobiographical Acts. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1976. 93-126.

Burke, Thomas. "The Obsequies of Mr Williams: New Light on De Quincey’s Famous Tale of Murder." The Bookman 68 (1928), 257-63.

Burwick, Frederick. “De Quincey on the Secession of the Church of Scotland.” The Wordsworth Circle 29 (1998): 109-14.

---. "De Quincey and the Aesthetics of Violence." The Wordsworth Circle 27 (1996): 78-86.

---. "Motion and Paralysis in 'The English Mail-Coach.'" Wordsworth Circle 26.2 (1995): 66-77.

---. "The Dream Visions of Jean Paul and Thomas De Quincey." Comparitive Literature 20.1 (1968): 1-26.

Byrns, Richard. "De Quincey's Revisions in the 'Dream-Fugue.'" PMLA 77.1 (1962): 97-101.

Cafarelli, Annette Wheeler. “Thomas De Quincey: The Allegory of Everyday Life.” Prose in the Age of Poets: Romanticism and Biographical Narrative from Johnson to De Quincey. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1990. 151-91.

Carnall, Geoffrey. "De Quincey on Knocking at the Gate." Review of English Literature 2 (1961): 49-57.

Caseby, Richard. The Opium-Eating Editor: Thomas De Quincey and the Westmorland Gazette. Kendal: Westmorland Gazette, 1985.

Chandler, Raymond. "The Simple Art of Murder: An Essay." The Simple Art of Murder. New York, 1988. 1-18.

Chavkin, Allan and Oehlschlaeger, Fritz. "In Europe with Carlyle, De Quincey, and Samuel Rogers: Five Letters of James T. Fields to Edwin P. Whipple." The American Transcendental Quarterly 38 (1978): 121-35.

Chilcott, Tim. "De Quincey and The London Magazine." Charles Lamb Bulletin N.S. 1 (1973): 1-19.

Clarke, David F., “On the Incompleteness of the Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” The Wordsworth Circle 8.4 (1977): 368-76.

Clej, Alina. A Genealogy of the Modern Self: Thomas De Quincey and the Intoxication of Writing. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995.

Cohen, Susan R. "Avoiding the High Prophetic Strain: De Quincey's Mail-Coach and Felix Holt." Victorian Newsletter 64 (1983): 19-20.

Cooke, Michael G. “De Quincey, Coleridge, and the Formal Uses of Intoxication.” Yale French Studies 50 (1974): 26-40.

Critchley, T. A. and James, P. D. The Maul and the Pear Tree: The Ratcliffe Highway Murders, 1811. London: Constable, 1971.

Darbishire, Helen. "Introduction." De Quincey's Literary Criticism. Ed. Helen Darbishire. London: Henry Frowde, 1909. 7-36.

Davis, Mary. "De Quincey's Confessions: A Strategy for Salvation." Christianity and Literature 38.3 (1989): 33-44.

De Luca, V. A. "De Quincey's Icons of Apocalypse: Some Romantic Analogues." Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Snyder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 20-34.

---. Thomas De Quincey: The Prose of Vision. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.

---. "'The Type of a Mighty Mind': Mutual Influence in Wordsworth and De Quincey." Texas Studies in Literature and Language 13 (1971): 239-47.

Dendurent, H. O. Thomas De Quincey: A Reference Guide. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1978.

De Quincey, Thomas. De Quincey and his Publishers: The Letters of Thomas De Quincey to his Publishers, and Other Letters, 1819-32. Ed. Barry Symonds. Diss. University of Edinburgh, 1994.

---. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings. Ed. Grevel Lindop. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985.

---. Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets. Ed David Wright. Middlesex: Penguin, 1970.

---. De Quincey as Critic. Ed. John E. Jordan. London: Routledge, 1973.

---. Selected Essays on Rhetoric by Thomas De Quincey. Ed. Frederick Burwick. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1967).

---. New Essays by De Quincey. Ed. Stuart Tave. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1966.

---. De Quincey to Wordsworth Ed. John E. Jordan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1963.

---. De Quincey at Work. Ed. W. H. Bonner. Buffalo: Airport Publishers, 1936.

---. A Diary of Thomas De Quincey, 1803. Ed. H. A. Eaton. London: Noel Douglas, 1927.

---. "Lasswade, December 27, 1847." Catalogue of Valuable Illuminated Manuscripts, Printed Books, and Autographed Letters. London: Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge, 1922. 123.

Devlin, D. D. De Quincey, Wordsworth and the Art of Prose. London: Macmillan, 1983.

Duckers, J. Scott. "The De Quincey Family." Times Literary Supplement. 21 Oct. 1920: 684.

Eaton, H. A. Thomas De Quincey: A Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1936.

Essig, Erhardt. "Thomas De Quincey and Robert Pearce Gillies as Champions of German Literature and Thought" Ph.D. diss. Northwestern University, 1951.

Favret, Mary. "Conclusion, or the Death of the Letter: Fiction, the Post Office, and 'The English Mail-Coach.'" Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics, and the Fiction of Letters. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. 197-213.

Forward, Kenneth. "De Quincey's Cessio Bonorum". PMLA 54 (1939): 511-25.

---. “’Libellous Attack’ on De Quincey.” PMLA 52 (1937): 244-60.

Goldman, Albert. The Mine and the Mint: Sources for the Writings of Thomas De Quincey. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1965.

Gordan, Jan. "De Quincey as Gothic Parasite: The Dynamic of Supplementarity." Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 239-62.

Gossman, Ann. "On Knocking at the Gate in 'Markheim.'" Nineteenth-Century Fiction 17 (1962): 73-6.

Gray, W. Forbes. "De Quincey as Lady Nairne's Tenant." Chambers's Journal. 7th Series. 16 (1926): 181-84.

Green, J. A. Thomas De Quincey: A Bibliography Based Upon the De Quincey Collection in the Moss Side Library. Manchester: Moss Side Library, 1908.

Groves, David. “De Quincey and the Early Issues of Blackwood’s Magazine. Notes and Queries 46 (1999): 473-74.

---. “Climbing the Post: Thomas De Quincey as a Newspaper Editor, 1827-28.” The Wordsworth Circle 29.2 (1998): 126-31.

---. "De Quincey, the West Indies, and the Edinburgh Evening Post." The Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America 86 (1992): 41-56.

---. “De Quincey, Friedrich Schlegel, and Victor Cousin.“ Notes and Queries 37 (1990): 27-28.

---. “De Quincey: A ’Lost’ Passage from The Edinburgh Evening Post. Notes and Queries 37 (1990): 419-20.

---. “De Quincey, David Robinson, and The Edinburgh Post. Notes and Queries 37 (1990): 420.

---. “De Quincey and Danish Poetry” Notes and Queries 35 (1988): 313-15.

---. “De Quincey’s ‘Daughter of Lebannon’ and the Execution of Mary McKinnon.” The Wordsworth Circle 19.2 (1988): 105-07.

Haltresht, Michael. "The Meaning of De Quincey's 'Dream-Fugue on... Sudden Death.'" Literature and Psychology 26 (1976): 31-36.

Hayden, John. "De Quincey’s Confessions and the Reviewers." The Wordsworth Circle 6 (1975): 273–9.

Hayter, Alethea. Opium and the Romantic Imagination. London: Faber, 1969.

Henderson, Willie. “Thomas De Quincey reads David Ricardo.” Economics as Literature. London: Routledge, 1995. 91-111.

Hendricks, Cecilia Hennel. "Thomas De Quincey: Symptomatologist." PMLA 60.3 (1945): 828-40.

Herbert, Christopher. "De Quincey and Dickens." Victorian Studies 17 (1974): 247-63.

Holstein, Michael E. “‘An Apocalypse of the World Within’: Autobiographical Exegesis in De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822).” Prose Studies 2 (1979): 88-102.

Hopkins, Robert. “De Quincey on War and the Pastoral Design of ‘The English Mail-Coach.’” Studies in Romanticism 6.3 (1967): 129-51.

Hubbard, Stacy. "Telling Accounts: De Quincey at the Booksellers." Postmodernism Across the Ages: Essays for a Postmodernity that Wasn't Born Yesterday. Ed. Bill Readings and Bennet Schaber. Syracuse NY: Syracuse University Press, 1993. 153-170.

Hubble, Douglas. “Opium, Addiction and English Literature.” Medical History 1 (1957): 323-35.

Hughes, Henry. "De Quincey, a Chymru, a’r Methodistiaid." Y Trysorfa (1900): 292-99.

Jack, Ian. "De Quincey Revises his Confessions." PMLA 72.1 (1957): 122-146.

Janzow, Samuel. "'Philadelphus,' a New Essay by De Quincey." Costerus 9 (1973): 29-63.

Jordan, John E. “Grazing the Brink: De Quincey’s Ironies.” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 199-212.

---. Thomas De Quincey, Literary Critic: His Method and Achievement. New York: Gordian Press, 1973.

---. "Introduction." De Quincey as Critic. Ed John E. Jordan. London: Routledge, 1973.

---. "Thomas De Quincey." The English Romantic Poets and Essayists. Ed. C. W. Houtchens and L. H. Houtchens. New York: New York University Press, 1966. 289-331.

---. "Commentary." De Quincey to Wordsworth: A Biography of a Relationship. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1963. 1-27, 47-85, 203-236, 278-302, 334-365.

---. "De Quincey on Wordsworth's Theory of Diction." PMLA 68 (1953): 764-778.

---. Thomas De Quincey: Literary Critic. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1952.

Kidd, Cameron. “De Quincey’s Grammar.” Saturday Review 102 (1906): 237.

Leask, Nigel."Toward a Universal Aesthetic: De Quincey on Murder as Carnival and Tragedy." Questioning Romanticism. Ed. John Beer. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995. 92-120.

---. “‘Murdering One’s Double’: Thomas De Quincey and S. T. Coleridge.” British Romantic Writers and the East: Anxiety of Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992. 170-228.

Leech, Clifford. "De Quincey as Literary Critic." Review of English Literature. 2 (1961): 38-48.

Leighton, Angela. “De Quincey and Women” in Beyond Romanticism: New Approaches to Texts and Contexts 1780-1832. Ed. Stephen Copley and John Whale. London: Routledge, 1992. 160-77.

Lent, John. “Thomas De Quincey, Subjectivity, and Modern Literature: A Consideration of the Release of Vision in Confessions of an English Opium Eater and ‘Suspiria de Profundis.’” Sphinx 9 (1979): 36-58.

Lever, Karen M. “De Quincey as Gothic Hero: A Perspective on Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and ‘Suspiria de Profundis.’” Texas Studies in Language and Literature 21 (1979): 332-46.

Lindop, Grevel. “Line-End Hyphenation as a Problem for Editors, with Case-Studies from De Quincey.” Yearbook of English Studies 29 (1999): 191-202.

---. “Gabriel and His Adversary: Problems and Principles in the Editing of De Quincey's Works.” The Wordsworth Circle 29 (1998): 106-09.

---. “De Quincey and the Edinburgh and Glasgow University Circles.” Grub Street and the Ivory Tower: Essays on Literary Journalism and Literary Scholarship. Ed. B. Bennett and J. Treglown. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. 41-57.

---. “De Quincey and the Cursed Crocodile.” Essays in Criticism 45.2 (1995): 121-40.

---. “De Quincey’s Wordsworthian Quotations.” The Wordsworth Circle 26 (1995): 58-65.

---. “De Quincey’s ‘Immortal Druggist’ and Wordsworth’s ‘Power of Music.’” Notes and Queries 93 (1994): 341-3.

---. “De Quincey and the Portico Library.” Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 76 (1994): 179-86.

---. “Pursuing the Throne of God: De Quincey and the Evangelical Revival.” Charles Lamb Bulletin 52 (1985): 97-111.

---. “Innocence and Revenge: The Problem of De Quincey’s Fiction.” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 213-37.

---. The Opium-Eater: A Life of Thomas De Quincey. London: J. M. Dent, 1981.

Logan, Peter Melville. "Suspira de Machina: De Quincey's Body and the Confessions of an English Opium Eater." Nerves and Narratives: A Cultural History of Hysteria in Nineteenth-Century Britain. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. 73-108.

Long, John. “Thomas De Quincey, Clinician.” The Wordsworth Circle 24 (1993): 170-77.

Lyon, Judson. Thomas De Quincey. New York: Twayne, 1969.

Malkan, Jeffrey. “Aggressive Text: Murder and the Fine Arts Revisited.” Mosaic 23 (1990): 101-14.

Mandel, Ernest. Delightful Murder: A Social History of the Crime Story. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984.

Maniquis, Robert. "The Dark Interpreter and the Palimpsest of Violence: De Quincey and the Unconscious." Thomas De Quincey Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Snyder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 109-39.

---. “V. A. De Luca, Thomas De Quincey: The Prose of Vision.” Studies in Romanticism 23 (1984): 139-47.

---. “Lonely Empires: Personal and Public Visions of Thomas De Quincey.” Literary Monographs. Ed. Eric Rothstein and Joseph Anthony Wittreich. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1976. 8: 47-127.

May, Claire B. "From Dream to Text: The Collective Unconscious in the Aesthetic Theory of Thomas De Quincey." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 16 (1995): 75–83.

Mayoux, Jean-Jacques. "De Quincey: Humour and Drugs" Veins of Humour. Ed. Harry Levin. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1972. 109-129.

McCusker, Honor. “De Quincey and the Landlord.” More Books 14.2 (1939): 66.

McDonagh, Josephine. De Quincey’s Disciplines. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.

---. "Opium and the Imperial Imagination." Reviewing Romanticism. Ed. Philip Martin and Robin Jarvis. New York: St. Martin's, 1992. 116-133.

---. “Do or Die: Problems of Agency and Gender in the Aesthetics of Murder.“ Genders, 5 (1989): 120-34.

McFarland, G. F. “Julius Charles Hare: Coleridge, De Quincey, and German Literature.” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 47 (1964-65): 165-97.

McFarland, Thomas. “De Quincey’s Journey to the End of Night.“ Romantic Cruxes: The English Essayists and the Spirit of the Age. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. 90-122.

Metcalf, John Calvin. De Quincey: A Portrait. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1940.

Michelsen, Peter. "Thomas De Quincey und Goethe." Euphorion 50 (1956): 86-102.

---. "Thomas De Quincey und Schiller." German Life and Letters 9 (1956): 91-99.

Miller, J. Hillis. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Disappearance of God. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1963. 17-80.

Milligan, Barry. Pleasures and Pains: Opium and the Orient in Nineteenth-Century British Culture. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1995. (Esp. 46-68.)

Moldenhauer, Joseph. "Murder as a Fine Art: Basic Connections Between Poe's Aesthetics, Psychology, and Moral Vision." PMLA 83 (1968): 284-97.

Moore, E. Hamilton. "Some Unpublished Letters of Thomas De Quincey." Review of English Studies 9 (1933): 176-85.

Morrison, Robert. “De Quincey and the Opium-Eater’s Other Selves.” Romanticism 5 (1999): 87-103.

---. “The ’Scotchman of eminent name’ in De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” Notes and Queries 46 (1999): 45-7.

---. “’An Edinburgh surgeon of great eminence’ in De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” Notes and Queries 46 (1999): 47-8.

---. “Julian North, De Quincey Reviewed: Thomas De Quincey’s Critical Reception, 1821-1994.” Romanticism on the Net, 13 (1999).

---. “Essayists of the Romantic Period: De Quincey, Hazlitt, Hunt, and Lamb.” Literature of the Romantic Period: A Bibliographical Guide. Ed. Michael O’Neill. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. 341-363.

---. “Red De Quincey.” The Wordsworth Circle 28 (1998): 131-36.

---. “Margaret Russett, De Quincey’s Romanticism: Canonical Minority and the Forms of Transmission.” Romanticism on the Net, 10 (1998).

---. “Opium-Eaters and Magazine Wars: De Quincey and Coleridge in 1821.” Victorian Periodicals Review 30 (1997): 27-40.

---. “Alina Clej, A Genealogy of the Modern Self: Thomas De Quincey and the Intoxication of Writing; Charles Rzepka, Sacramental Commodities: Gift, Text, and the Sublime in De Quincey; Matthew Schneider, Original Ambivalence: Autobiography and Violence in Thomas De Quincey.” Keats-Shelley Journal, 46 (1997): 202-05.

---. “‘The Bog School’: Carlyle and De Quincey.” Carlyle Studies Annual 15 (1995): 13-20.

---. “’I here present you, courteous reader’: the Literary Presence of Thomas De Quincey.” The Charles Lamb Bulletin 90 (1995): 68-72.

---. “Josephine McDonaugh, De Quincey’s Disciplines.” The Charles Lamb Bulletin 91 (1995): 163-64.

---. “De Quincey, Champion of Shelley.” Keats-Shelley Journal 41 (1992): 36-41.

---. “John Barrell, The Infection of Thomas De Quincey.” The Charles Lamb Bulletin 78 (1992): 210-12.

---. “Edmund Baxter, De Quincey’s Art of Autobiography.” The Charles Lamb Bulletin 75 (1991): 103-04.

Mortimer, John. "Some Notes on De Quincey." The Manchester Quarterly 19 (1900): 146-62.

Most, Glenn W. and Stowe, William W., eds. The Poetics of Murder: Detective Fiction and Literary Theory. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1983.

Murray, James G. "Mill on De Quincey: Esprit Critique Revoked." Victorian Newsletter 37 (1970): 7-12.

Needham, Lawrence. "De Quincey’s Rhetoric of Display and Confessions of an English Opium-Eater."Rhetorical Traditions and British Romantic Literature. Ed. Don Bialostosky and Lawrence Needham. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. 48-61.

North, Julian. De Quincey Reviewed: Thomas De Quincey’s Critical Reception, 1821-1994. London: Camden House, 1997.

---. "Leeches and Opium: De Quincey Replies to 'Resolution and Independence' in Confessions of an English Opium-Eater." The Modern Language Review 89.3 (1994): 572-580.

---. "Opium and the Romantic Imagination: The Creation of a Myth." Beyond the Pleasure Dome: Writing and Addiction from the Romantics. Ed. Sue Vice, Matthew Campbell, and Tim Armstrong. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994. 109-17.

O’Quinn, Daniel. “Murder, Hospitality, Philosophy: De Quincey and the Complicitious Grounds of National Identity.” Studies in Romanticism 38.2 (1999): 135-70.

---. “The Gog and The Magog of Hunnish Desolation: De Quincey, Kant and the Practice of Death.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 20 (1997): 1-26.

Orwell, George. "The Decline of English Murder." Smothered Under Journalism: 1946. Ed. Peter Davison. London: Secker and Warburg, 1998. 108-110.

Owen, W. J. B. “De Quincey and Shoplifting.” The Wordsworth Circle 21 (1990): 72-6.

Parsons, Coleman O. "The Woes of Thomas De Quincey." Review of English Studies 10 (1934): 190-99.

Parssinen, Terry M. Secret Passions, Secret Remedies: Narcotic Drugs in British Society, 1820-1930. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1983.

Patterson, Charles. "De Quincey's Conception of the Novel as Literature of Power." PMLA 70 (1955): 375-89.

Perry, Curtis. “Piranesi’s Prison: Thomas De Quincey and the Failure of Autobiography.” Studies in English Literature 33.4 (1993): 809-24.

Pireddu, Nicoletta. "‘Portable Ecstasies’: the Rhetoric of Opium in De Quincey’s Autobiography." Étude Anglaises, 48.3 (1995), 268-276.

Platzner, Robert.De Quincey and the Dilemma of Romantic Autobiography.” Dalhousie Review 61.4 (1982): 605-17.

Plant, Sadie. Writing on Drugs. New York: Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 1999.

Playfair, G. M. H. "De Quincey: The Murderer Williams." Notes and Queries 11.5 (1912): 6.

Plotz, Judith. "In the Footsteps of Aladdin: De Quincey's Arabian Nights." The Wordsworth Circle 29 (1998): 120-26.

---. “Imaginary Kingdoms with Real Boys in Them: or How the Quincey Brothers Built the British Empire.” The Wordsworth Circle 27 (1996): 131-36.

---. “On Guilt Considered as One of the Fine Arts: De Quincey’s Criminal Imagination.” The Wordsworth Circle 19 (1988): 83-8.

Plumtree, A. S. “The Artist as Murderer: De Quincey’s Essay ‘On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.’” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 140-63.

Porter, Roger. “The Demon Past: De Quincey and the Autobiographer’s Dilemma.” Studies in English Literature 20.4 (1980): 591-609.

Praz, Mario. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Hero in Eclipse in Victorian Fiction. London: Oxford University Press, 1956. 75-86.

Proctor, Sigmund. Thomas De Quincey's Theory of Literature. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1943.

Prod'homme, J. G. "Berlioz, Musset, and Thomas De Quincey." The Musical Quarterly 32 (1946): 98-106.

Proudfit, Charles. "Thomas De Quincey and Sigmund Freud: Sons, Fathers, Dreamers - Precursors of Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology." Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 88-108.

Quennell, Peter. “Books in General.” New Statesman and Nation 60 (1950): 429-30.

Ramsey, Roger. “The Structure of De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” Prose Studies 1 (1978): 21-9.

Rayment, Henry. "De Quincey and 4, York Street, Covent Garden." Notes and Queries. 11th Series. 12 (1913): 104-5.

Ready, Robert. "De Quincey's Magnificent Apparatus." Interspace and the Inward Sphere: Essays on Romantic and Victorian Self. Ed. Norman A. Anderson and Margene E. Weiss. Macomb, IL: Western Illinois University, 1978. 43-50.

Reed, Arden. “‘Booked for Utter Perplexity’ on De Quincey’s ‘English Mail-Coach.’” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1985. 279-307.

---. "Abysmal Influence: Baudelaire, Coleridge, De Quincey, Piranesi, Wordsworth." Glyph: Textual Studies 4 (1978): 188-206.

Roberts, Daniel. “Coleridge’s Liverpool Connection.” Notes and Queries 46 (1999): 455-7.

---. “Thomas De Quincey’s ‘Danish Origin of the Lake Country Dialect.’” Transactions of the Westmorland and Cumberland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society 99 (1999): 256-65.

---. “The Missing Letters of Thomas De Quincey to Samuel Taylor Coleridge.” English Language Notes 36 (1998): 21-7.

---. “De Quincey’s Discovery of Lyrical Ballads: The Politics of Reading.” Studies in Romanticism 36 (1997): 511-40.

---. “Three Uncollected Coleridgean Marginalia from De Quincey.” Notes and Queries 41 (1994): 330-6.

---. “Dreams and the Unconscious in Coleridge and De Quincey.” The Wordsworth Circle 24 (1993): 91-6.

---. “Autobiography as Identity: The Case of Thomas De Quincey.” Aligarh Critical Miscellany 4 (1991): 52-65.

Rockwell, Frederick. "De Quincey and the Ending of Moby Dick." Nineteenth-Century Fiction 9 (1954): 161-68.

Ronell, Avital. Crack Wars: Literature, Addiction, Mania. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992.

Roughead, William. “A Case for De Quincey.” Juridical Review 36 (1924): 295-321.

Russett, Margaret. De Quincey’s Romanticism: Canonical Minority and the Forms of Transmission. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Rzepka, Charles. “The ‘Dark Problem’ of Greek Tragedy: Sublimated Violence in De Quincey.” The Wordsworth Circle 29 (1998): 114-20.

---. “Thomas De Quincey’s ‘Three-Fingered Jack’: The West Indian Origins of the ‘Dark Interpreter.’” European Romantic Review 2 (1997): 117-38.

---. "Slavery, Sodomy, and De Quincey's 'Savannah-La-Mer': Surplus Labor Value in Urban Gothic." The Wordsworth Circle 27.1 (1996): 33-37.

---. Sacramental Commodities: Gift, Text, and the Sublime in De Quincey. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1995.

---. "De Quincey and the Malay: Dove Cottage Idolatry." The Wordsworth Circle 24 (1993): 180–5.

Sackville-West, Edward. A Flame in Sunlight: The Life and Works of Thomas De Quincey (London: Cassell, 1936; reprinted, ed. John E. Jordan, London: Bodley Head, 1974).

Saintsbury, George. “Thomas De Quincey” in The Collected Essays and Papers, 4 vols. London: Dent, 1923. 1: 210-38.

Sartre, Jean-Paul. "On the Fine Arts Considered as Murder." Saint Genet: Actor and Martyr. Ed. and trans. Bernard Frechtman. New York: George Braziller Inc., 1963. 483-543.

Sawyer, Paul. "Musset's Translation of Confessions of an English Opium Eater." French Review 42.3 (1969): 403-408.

Schoenfield, Mark. “The Shifting Relic: Thomas De Quincey’s ‘Samuel Taylor Coleridge.’” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 12 (1998): 105-21.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. “Language as Live Burial: Thomas De Quincey.” The Coherence of Gothic Conventions. New York: Methuen, 1986. 37-96.

Senelick, Laurence. The Prestige of Evil: The Murderer as Romantic Hero from Sade to Lacenaire. New York: Garland, 1987.

Shilstone, Frederick. "Autobiography as 'Involute': DeQuincey on the Therapies of Memory." South Atlantic Review 48.1 (1983): 20-34.

Smith, Jonathan. "De Quincey's Revisions to 'The System of the Heavens.'" Victorian Periodicals Review 26 (1993): 203-12.

Snyder, Robert Lance. "De Quincey's Literature of Power: A Mythic Paradigm." Studies in English Literature 26.4 (1986): 691-711.

---. "A De Quinceyan Source for Poe's 'The Masque of the Red Death.'" Studies in Short Fiction 21 (1983): 103-10.

Spector, Stephen. “Thomas De Quincey: Self-Effacing Autobiographer.” Studies in Romanticism 18 (1979): 501-20.

Stapleton, Laurence. “The Virtù of De Quincey.” The Elected Circle: Studies in the Art of Prose. Ed. Laurence Stapleton. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973. 119-65.

Stephen, Leslie. "Thomas De Quincey." De Quincey Selections. Ed. M. R. Ridley. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1927. 1-30.

Sudan, Rajani. "Englishness "A'muck": De Quincey's Confessions." Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture 27 (1994): 377-94.

Sullivan, Margo Ann. Murder and Art: Thomas De Quincey and the Ratcliffe Highway Murders New York: Garland, 1987.

Sundelson, David. "Evading the Crocodile: De Quincey's 'The English Mail-Coach.'" Psychocultural Review 1 (1977): 9-20.

Super, Robert H. "De Quincey and a Murderer’s Conscience." Times Literary Supplement 5 Dec. 1936: 1016.

Symonds, Barry. “‘Do not suppose that I am underwriting myself’: The Labyrinth of De Quincey’s Manuscripts.” The Wordsworth Circle 29 (1998): 137-140.

---. “The Stranger’s Grave: Laying a De Quinceyan Ghost.“ The Charles Lamb Bulletin n.s. 83 (1993): 10507.

Thron, E. Michael. "The Significance of Catherine Wordsworth's Death to Thomas De Quincey and William Wordsworth." Studies in English Literature 28.4 (1988): 559-67.

---. “Thomas De Quincey and the Fall of Literature.” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 3-19.

---. "Speed, Steam, Self, and Thomas De Quincey." Interspace and the Inward Sphere: Essays on Romantic and Victorian Self. Ed. Norman A. Anderson and Margene E. Weiss. Macomb, IL: Western Illinois University, 1978. 51-58.

Vann, J Don. “An Unpublished De Quincey Letter.” Philological Quarterly 50 (1971): 683-84.

Wellek, René. “De Quincey’s Status in the History of Ideas.” Philological Quarterly 23 (1944): 248-72.

Wells, John. "De Quincey and The Prelude in 1839." Philological Quarterly 20 (1941): 1-24.

---. "Wordsworth and De Quincey in Westmorland Politics, 1818." PMLA 55 (1940): 248-72.

Whale, John. “‘In a Stranger’s Ear’: De Quincey’s Polite Magazine Context.” Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Synder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 35-53.

---. Thomas De Quincey’s Reluctant Autobiography. London: Croom Helm, 1984.

Whitaker, Steven. "Burroughs and De Quincey: Two Tasters of 'the Divine Luxuries.'" Dionysos: The Literature and Addiction Tri-Quarterly 4.3 (1993): 9-11.

Wilner, Joshua. “The Stewed Muse of Prose.” Modern Language Notes 104 (1989): 1085-98.

---. “Autobiography and Addiction: The Case of De Quincey.” Genre 14 (1981): 493-503.

Woodhouse, Richard. “Richard Woodhouse’s Cause Book: The Opium-Eater, the Magazine Wars, and the London Literary Scene in 1821.” Ed. Robert Morrison. The Harvard Library Bulletin 9 (1998): i-xxiv, 1-43.

Woof, Robert. Thomas De Quincey: An English Opium-Eater. Cumbria: CN Print Ltd., 1985.

Wordsworth, Jonathan. “Two Dark Interpreters: Wordsworth and De Quincey.” The Wordsworth Circle 17 (1986): 40-50.

Wright, David. "Introduction." Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets. Ed. David Wright. Middlesex: Penguin, 1970.

Young, Michael. "'The True Hero of the Tale': De Quincey's Confessions and Affective Autobiographical Theory." Thomas De Quincey: Bicentenary Studies. Ed. Robert Lance Snyder. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. 54-71.

Youngquist, Paul. “De Quincey’s Crazy Body.” PMLA 114 (1999): 346-58.

Ziolkowski, Theodore. "A Portrait of the Artist as a Criminal." Dimensions of the Modern Novel: German Texts and European Contexts. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969. 289-331.

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Twenty-First-Century Scholarship

| A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M |

| N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Agnew, Lois Peters. Thomas De Quincey: British Rhetoric's Romantic Turn. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2012.

Balfour, Ian. “On the Language of the Sublime and the Sublime Nation in De Quincey: Toward a Reading of ‘The English Mail-Coach.‘“ Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 165-86.

Boon, Marcus. The Road of Excess: A History of Writers on Drugs. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002.

Black, Joel. “National Bad Habits: Thomas De Quincey's Geography of Addiction.“ Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 143-64.

Bridgwater, Patrick. De Quincey's Gothic Masquerade. New York: Rodopi, 2004.

Brown, Daniel. “The Works of Thomas De Quincey: Volumes 8, 9, 12, 13, 17, 18.Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 87-99.

Burt, E. S. Regard for the Other: Autothanatography in Rousseau, De Quincey, Baudelaire, and Wilde. New York: Fordham University Press, 2009.

Burwick, Frederick. "De Quincey as Autobiographer." Romantic Autobiography in England. Ed. Eugene Stelzig. Farnham: Ashgate, 2009. 117-29.

---. Thomas De Quincey: Knowledge and Power. London: Palgrave, 2001.

Byerly, Alison. "Accident or Murder? Intentionality, the Picturesque, and the Body of Thomas De Quincey." Nineteenth-Century Prose 29.2 (2002): 48-68.

Clark, David L. “We ‘Other Prussians‘: Bodies and Pleasures in De Quincey and Late Kant.” European Romantic Review 14 (2003): 261-87.

Cohen, Michael. "Introduction - Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts." Murder Most Fair. Cranbury, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2000. 13-24.

Crawford, Joseph. "The Haunting of Thomas De Quincey." Cambridge Quarterly 40.3 (2011): 224-42.

Dalrymple, Theodore. “Poppycock.” The Wall Street Journal 25 May 2006.

---. Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy. New York: Encounter, 2006.

Dart, Gregory. “Chambers of Horror: De Quincey's ‘Postscript‘ to ‘On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.‘” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 187-210.

De Groote, Brecht and Toremans, Tom. "From Alexis to Scott and De Quincey: Walladmor and the Irony of Pseudotranslation." Essays in Romanticism 21.2 (2014): 107-23.

De Quincey, Thomas. Confessions of an English Opium Eater and Other Writings. Ed. Robert Morrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

---. On Murder. Ed. Robert Morrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.

---. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings. Ed. Barry Milligan. London: Penguin, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume One: Writings, 1799-1820. Ed. Barry Symonds. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Two: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, 1821-1856. Ed. Grevel Lindop. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Three: Articles and Translations from the London Magazine, Blackwood’s Magazine and Others, 1821-24. Ed. Frederick Burwick. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Four: Articles and Translations from the London Magazine; Walladmor, 1824-25. Ed. Frederick Burwick. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Five: Articles from the Edinburgh Saturday Post, 1827-28. Ed. David Groves. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Six: Articles from the Edinburgh Evening Post, Blackwood’s Magazine, and the Edinburgh Literary Gazette, 1826-29. Ed. David Groves and Grevel Lindop. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Seven: Articles from the Edinburgh Literary Gazette and Blackwood’s Magazine, 1829-31. Ed. Robert Morrison. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2000.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Eight: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine and the Gallery of Portraits; Klosterheim: or, The Masque, 1831-32. Ed. Robert Morrison. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Nine: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine and Tait’s Magazine, 1832-38. Ed. Grevel Lindop, Robert Morrison, and Barry Symonds. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Ten: Articles from Tait’s Magazine, 1834-38. Ed. Alina Clej. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Eleven: Articles from Tait’s Magazine and Blackwood’s Magazine, 1838-41. Ed. Julian North. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Twelve: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine, 1840-41. Ed. Grevel Lindop. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Thirteen: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine and the Encyclopedia Britannica, 1841-42. Ed. Grevel Lindop and John Whale. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Fourteen: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine, 1842-43. Ed. John Whale. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Fifteen: Articles from Blackwood’s Magazine and Tait’s Magazine. Ed. Frederick Burwick. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Sixteen: Articles from Tait’s Magazine, MacPhail’s Edinburgh Ecclesiastical Journal, the Glasgow Athenaeum Album, the North British Review, and Blackwood’s Magazine. Ed. Robert Morrison. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Seventeen: Articles from Hogg’s Instructor and Tait’s Magazine, 1850-52. Ed. Edmund Baxter. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Eighteen: Articles from Hogg’s Instructor and Titan, 1853-58. Ed. Edmund Baxter. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2001.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Nineteen: Autobiographic Sketches. Ed. Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Twenty: Prefaces &c. to the Collected Editions; Published Addenda; Marginalia; Manuscript Addenda; Undatable Manuscripts. Ed. Grevel Lindop, et al. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

---. The Works of Thomas De Quincey, Volume Twenty-One: Transcripts of Unlocated Manuscripts. Ed. Grevel Lindop. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2003.

DeGrandpre, Richard. The Cult of Pharmacology. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006.

Derrida, Jacques. “The Rhetoric of Drugs.” High Culture: Reflections on Addiction and Modernity. Ed. Anna Alexander and Mark S. Roberts. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003. 19-43.

Dillon, Sarah. "Reinscribing De Quincey's Palimpsest: The Significance of the Palimpsest in Contemporary Literary and Cultural Studies." Textual Practice 19.3 (2005): 243-63.

Duffy, Cian. “’His Canaille of an Audience’: Thomas De Quincey and the Revolution in Reading.“ Studies in Romanticism 44.1 (2005): 7-22.

Faflak, Joel. "Re-Collecting De Quincey." Romanticism on the Net 40 (2005).

---. "De Quincey Collects Himself." Nervous Reactions: Victorian Recollections of Romanticism. Ed. Joel Faflak and Julia M. Wright. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004. 23-45.

Fay, Elizabeth. "Hallucinogenesis: Thomas De Quincey's Mind Trips." Studies in Romanticism 49.2 (2010): 293-312.

Ford, Natalie. "Beyond Opium: De Quincey's Range of Reveries." Cambridge Quarterly 36 (2007): 229-49.

Foxcroft, Louise. The Making of Addiction: The 'Use and Abuse' of Opium in Nineteenth-Century Britain. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.

Franta, Andrew. "Publication and Mediation in 'The English Mail-Coach.'" European Romantic Review 22.3 (2011): 323-30.

Frey, Anne. “De Quincey’s Imperial Systems.” Studies in Romanticism 44.1 (2005): 41-61.

Fulford, Tim. “De Quincey’s Literature of Power.” The Wordsworth Circle 31 (2000): 158-6.

Garcia, Humberto. "In the Name of the 'Incestuous Mother': Islam and Excremental Protestantism in De Quincey's Infidel Book." Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 7 (2007): 57-87.

Groves, David. “’Disgusted with all the Cockneys’: De Quincey, the London Magazine, and Blackwood’s Magazine.“ Notes and Queries 47 (2000): 326-27.

Haggerty, Martin. “Thomas De Quincey.” Biographical Dictionary of British Economists. Ed. Donald Rutherford. 2 vols. London and New York: Thoemmes Continuum, 2004. 1. 307-12.

---. “Thomas De Quincey.” The Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers. Ed. W. J. Mander and A. P. F. Sell. 2 vols. Bristol: Thoemmes Press, 2002. 1. 312-16.

Hewitt, Regina. "Identities and Involutes: Some Reflections on Narrative Ethics." Studies in Symbolic Interaction 30 (2008): 105-30.

Higgins, David. "Imagining the Exotic: De Quincey and Lamb in the London Magazine." Romanticism 17 (2011): 288-98.

Hull, Simon. "Domestic Extremism and De Quincey's 'A-muck' Malay." Essays in Romanticism 21.1 (2014): 17-34.

Iseli, Markus. "Thomas De Quincey and the Cognitive Prospects of the Unconscious." European Romantic Review 24:3 (2013): 325-333.

Jackson, Richard D. “James Hogg and the Unfathomable Hell.” Romanticism on the Net 28 (2002).

---. “The Devil, the Doppelgänger, and the Confessions of James Hogg and Thomas De Quincey.” Studies in Hogg and his World 12 (2001): 90-103.

Jagoe, Eva-Lynn Alicia. “Degrading Forms of Pantomime: Englishness and Shame in De Quincey.“ Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 23-40.

Jarvis, Robin. "The Glory of Motion: De Quincey, Travel, and Romanticism." Yearbook of English Studies 34 (2004): 74-87.

Jong, Petrus de. De Quincey's Loved Ones. Oosterhout: Totalprint, 2009.

Kelly, Duncan. "The Art and Science of Politics in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, c. 1817-1841." Romanticism and Blackwood's Magazine: An Unprecedented Phenomenon.Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 137-48.

Khalip, Jacques. "Arendt, De Quincey, and Byron in Dark Times." European Romantic Review 21.5 (2010): 615-30.

Krishnan, Sanjay. "Opium and Empire: The Transports of Thomas De Quincey." Boundary 2 33 (2006): 203-34.

Lehman, David. The Perfect Murder: A Study in Detection. Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2000. 37-54.

Lindop, Grevel. “De Quincey’s Confessions in Context.” Confessions of an English Opium-Eater: Thomas De Quincey. Ed. Jean-Pierre Naugrette. Nantes: Editions Du Temps, 2003. 7-20.

Maa, Gerald. "Keeping Time with the Mail-Coach: Anachronism and De Quincey's 'The English Mail-Coach.'" Studies in Romanticism 50.1 (2011): 125-43.

Maniquis, Robert. "De Quincey,Vareities of the Palimpsest, and the Unconscious." Romanticism 17 (2011): 309-18.

---. “Introduction.” Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 3-5.

McCrum, Robert. “Beyond the Sensation.” The Observer 8 Jan. 2006.

McDonagh, Josephine. “De Quincey and the Secret Life of Books.” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 123-42.

---. “De Quincey, Malthus, and the Anachronism-Effect.” Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 63-80.

McGrath, Brian. "Thomas De Quincey and the Language of Literature: Or, on the Necessity of Ignorance." Studies in English Literature 47.4 (2007): 847-862.

Milligan, Barry. “Brunonianism, Radicalism, and ‘The Pleasures of Opium’.“ Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 45-61.

---. "Morphine-Addicted Doctors, the English Opium Eater, and Embattled Medical Authority." Victorian Literature and Culture 33 (2005): 541-53.

Morrison, Robert. "Dating the Dream Finale of De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater." Notes and Queries 60.2 (2013): 241-42.

---. "A Question of Address: William Maginn, the ‘Upright Critic’ in De Quincey’s Suspiria de Profundis." Notes and Queries 60.2 (2013): 257-59.

---. "Murder in Suspiria: De Quincey’s Dark Interpreter." Notes and Queries 60.2 (2013): 259-60.

---. "The Deaths of Julius and Margaret De Quincey: Family Tragedies in Suspiria de Profundis." Notes and Queries 60.2 (2013): 260-62.

---. "Cameraderie and Conflict: De Quincey and Wilson on Enemy Lines." Romanticism and Blackwood's Magazine: An Unprecedented Phenomenon. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 57-68.

---. "De Quincey's Addiction." Romanticism 17 (2011): 270-7.

---. The English Opium Eater: A Biography of Thomas De Quincey. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2009.

---. “‘Earthquake and Eclipse’: Radical Energies and De Quincey’s 1821 Confessions.Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 63-79.

---. "Introduction." Thomas De Quincey: On Murder. Ed. Robert Morrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. vii-xxvii.

---. “Chatterton at the Races: De Quincey, Cottle, Southey, and the ‘Battle of Hastynges.’” Notes and Queries 52 (2005): 51-2.

---. “‘De Quincey’s Revenge’: David Macbeth Moir and Confessions of an English Opium-Eater. Notes and Queries 52 (2005) 53-4.

---. “De Quincey on ‘Mount Pleasant’: William Roscoe and Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.” Notes and Queries 52 (2005): 54-6.

---. “Poe’s De Quincey, Poe’s Dupin.” Essays in Criticism 51 (2001): 424-41.

---. “Blackwood’s Berserker: John Wilson and the Language of Extremity.” Romanticism on the Net 20 (2000).

---. “The Opium-Eater on Stage: Eleanora Louisa Montagu’s Dramatization of De Quincey’s Klosterheim.” The Charles Lamb Bulletin NS 110 (2000): 78-83.

---. and Roberts, Daniel, eds. Romanticism and Blackwood's Magazine: An Unprecedented Phenomenon.Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

---. and Roberts, Daniel. “‘I was Worshipped; I was Sacrificed’: A Passage to Thomas De Quincey.” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 1-18.

---. and Roberts, Daniel, eds. Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical Directions. London: Routledge, 2007.

Myers, Victoria. “Frederick Burwick’s Thomas De Quincey: Knowledge and Power.Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 113-17.

North. Julian. “Wooing the Reader: De Quincey, Wordsworth, and Women in Tait's Edinburgh Magazine.Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 99-121.

O’Quinn, Daniel. “Ravishment Twice Weekly: De Quincey’s Opera Pleasures.” Romanticism on the Net 34-5 (2004).

---. “Who Owns What: Slavery, Property, and Eschatological Compensation in Thomas De Quincey’s Opium Writings.” Texas Studies in Language and Literature 45.3 (2003): 262-92.

Roberts, Daniel. "The Janus-Face of Romantic Modernity: Thomas De Quincey's Metropolitan Imagination." Romanticism 17 (2011): 299-308.

---. “‘Mix(ing) a little with Alien Natures’: Biblical Orientalism in De Quincey.” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 19-43.

---. “‘A nugget of pure truth’: Woolf’s Debt to De Quincey“. Notes and Queries 52 (2005): 94-5.

---. “Not ‘Forsworn with Pink Ribbons’: Thomas De Quincey, Hannah More and the Literature of Power.” Romanticism on the Net 25 (2002).

---. “Wordsworth’s Reading of Rachel Lee: De Quincey’s Evidence”. Notes and Queries 49 (2002): 465-7.

---. “Richard Woodhouse, Cause Book: The Opium-Eater, the Magazine Wars, and the London Literary Scene in 1821." Ed. Robert Morrison.” Victorian Periodicals Review 34 (2001): 298-300.

---. Revisionary Gleam: De Quincey, Coleridge, and the High Romantic Argument. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2000.

---. and Morrison, Robert, eds. Romanticism and Blackwood's Magazine: An Unprecedented Phenomenon. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

--- and Morrison, Robert. “‘I was Worshipped; I was Sacrificed’: A Passage to Thomas De Quincey.” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 1-18.

---. and Morrison, Robert, eds. Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical Directions. London: Routledge, 2007.

Rzepka, Charles. “‘A Deafening Menace in Tempestuous Uproars’: De Quincey's 1856 Confessions, the Indian Mutiny, and the Response of Collins and Dickens.“ Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 211-33.

---. “The Works of Thomas De Quincey: Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 81-87.

---. "Bang Up! Theatricality and the 'Diphrelatic Art' in De Quincey's 'English Mail-Coach.'" Nineteenth-Century Prose 28 (2001): 75-101.

---. “De Quincey and Kant.” PMLA 115.1 (2000): 93-94.

Schmid, Thomas. "Crocodiles and 'Inoculation' Reconsidered: De Quincey, Opium, and the Dream Object." Wordsworth Circle 39 (2008): 35-38.

Schmitt, Cannon, “Narrating National Addictions: De Quincey, Opium, and Tea.“ High Anxieties: Cultural Studies in Addiction. Ed. Janet Farrell Brodie and Marc Redfield. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. 63-84.

Schoenfield, Mark. "The Taste for Violence in Blackwood's Magazine." Romanticism and Blackwood's Magazine: An Unprecedented Phenomenon. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 187-202.

Shaw, Philip. “’On War’: De Quincey’s Martial Sublime.” Romanticism, 19.1 (2013): 19-30.

Silverman, Michael. "The Daughters of Thomas De Quincey: A Significant New Source for the Author's Life." Catalogue Twenty-Seven: Literary and Historical Manuscripts. London: Silverman, 2009. 26-40.

Simmons, Diane. “Thomas De Quincey: Dreams of China.” The Narcissism of Empire: Loss, Rage, and Revenge in Thomas De Quincey, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, and Isak Dinesen. Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press, 2007. 28-43.

---. "Narcissism and Sinophobia: The Case of Thomas De Quincey." Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society 7.2 (2002): 179-89.

Slusser, George. "Breaking the Mind Circle: De Quincey's 'The English Mail-Coach' and the Origins of Science Fiction." Extrapolation: A Journal and Science Fiction and Fantasy 42.2 (2001): 111-123.

Snyder, Robert Lance. "De Quincey's Liminal Interspaces: 'On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.'" Nineteenth-Century Prose 28.2 (2001): 102-18.

Stewart, David. "Commerce, Genius, and De Quincey's Literary Identity." Studies in English Literature 50.4 (2010): 775-789.

Sudan, Rajani. "De Quincey and the Topography of Romantic Desire." Fair Exotics: Xenophobic Subjects in English Literature, 1720-1850. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002. 65-95.

Terada, Rei. "Living a Ruined Life: De Quincey Beyond the Worst." European Romantic Review 20.2 (2009): 177-186.

Tracy, Robert. "‘Opium is the True Hero of the Tale’: De Quincey, Dickens, and The Mystery of Edwin Drood." Dickens Studies Annual: Essays on Victorian Fiction 40 (2009): 199-214.

Walker, Richard. "A Change in Physical Economy: Identity and the Rejectionk of Modernity in Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions." Inhuman Reflections: Thinking the Limits of the Human. Ed. Scott Brewster, John Joughin, David Owen, and Richard Walker. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000. 150-168.

Westbrook, Deeanne. “Deciphering Oracle: De Quincey’s Textual Epistemology.” The Wordsworth Circle 34 (2003): 158-71.

Whale, John. “De Quincey and Men (of Letters).” Thomas De Quincey: New Theoretical and Critical Directions. Ed. Robert Morrison and Daniel Sanjiv Roberts. London: Routledge, 2007. 81-97.

Wheeler, Michael. “The Works of Thomas De Quincey: Volumes 10, 11, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21.Studies in Romanticism 44 (2005): 99-112.

Worthington, Heather. “Connoisseur of crime: De Quincey’s defence of the ‘Murd’rous Art.’“ The Rise of the Detective in Early Nineteenth-Century Popular Fiction. London: Palgrave, 2005. 21-30.

Ziegenhagen, Timothy. "War Addiction in Thomas De Quincey's 'The English Mail-Coach.'" Wordsworth Circle 35.2 (2004): 93-98.

Zieger, Susan. "Pioneers of Inner Space: Drug Autobiography and Manifest Destiny." PMLA 122.5 (2007): 1531-1547.

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