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September 2014Next month
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14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22Visiting Author: Jordan Abel 23 24 25 26Steven Heighton (Writer in Residence) 27
28 29 30Grad School Information Session  
October 2014Next monthPrevious month
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  1 2 3Research Forum: Chris Bongie 4
5 6 7Visiting Author: Diane Schoemperlen 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20Visiting Author: Souvankham Thammavongsa 21Page Lecture: Stan Dragland 22Medieval Seminar: Ruth Wehlau 23Research Forum: Kris Manjapra 24 25
26 27 28 29Indigenous Film Night: Smoke Signals 30 31  
November 2014Next monthPrevious month
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2 3 4 5 6Research Forum: Jean Comaroff 7 8
9 10Visiting Author: Billeh Nickerson 11 12Medieval Seminar: Round Table on Medieval Studies 13 14Research Forum: Mary Nyquist 15
16 17 18 19Indigenous Film Night: Kissed by Lightning 20 21Research Forum: Barbara Seeber 22
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January 2015Next monthPrevious month
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25 26 27 28Indigenous Film Night: Boy 29 30 31
February 201Next monthPrevious month
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March 2015Next monthPrevious month
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1 2 3 4Indigenous Film Night: Brand New Day 5 6 7
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September 2014

Jordan Abel poster

Jordan Abel is a Nisga’a writer currently residing in Vancouver. Abel’s conceptual writing engages with the representation of Indigenous peoples in anthropology through the technique of erasure. He has been described as “a master carver of the page” who passes the work of sculpture along to the reader “who reads, and rereads, in three dimensions.” Abel’s chapbooks have been published by Above/Ground Press and JackPine Press. His first book, The Place of Scraps, received substantial critical acclaim and won the Dorothy Livesay prize. His second collection, Un/inhabited, is forthcoming from Talonbooks in October.

When: Monday, 22 September 2014, 1:00–2:30 pm

Where: Watson 517

Steven Heighton poster

Steven Heighton, the Department’s Writer in Residence for Fall 2014, offers a talk and a reading. His most recent books are the Trillium Award finalist The Dead Are More Visible (stories) and Workbook (memos and essays on writing). His novel Afterlands appeared in six countries; was a New York Times Book Review editors’ choice; was cited on best-of-year lists in ten publications in Canada, the USA, and the UK; and has been optioned for film. His stories and poetry have received four gold National Magazine Awards and have appeared in London Review of Books, Best English Stories, Best American Poetry, Zoetrope, Tin House, Poetry, Brick, TLR, New England Review, Agni, and five editions of Best Canadian Stories. He has been nominated for the Governor General’s Award and Britain’s W. H. Smith Award and is a fiction reviewer for the New York Times Book Review.

When: Friday, 26 September 2014, 2:30–4:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

Grad school info session poster

Graduate School Information Session, for English Majors in third or fourth year who are considering graduate study in English literature. Find out about choosing a program, studying overseas, and applying for funding. Come with questions!

When: Tuesday, 30 September 2014, 4:00–5:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

October 2014

Chris Bongie poster

Chris Bongie (Department of English), “The Foundational Fictions of Early Haitian Literature: Juste Chanlatte’s Le cri de la nature (1810) and the Unsettling (Presence) of Race.” This paper will engage with post/revolutionary literary production in Haiti by examining the symptomatically neglected figure of Juste Chanlatte, a man of state who served successively under Dessalines (1804–6), Christophe (1806–20), and Boyer (1820–8), and a writer whose poetry and plays earned him a reputation, by the time of his death in 1828, as the “honorary laureate of the republic.“ The paper focuses on the uniformly negative reception of Chanlatte by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Haitian historians (such as Joseph Saint-Rémy in the 1850s and Hénock Trouillot in the 1960s), in order not only to demonstrate some of the ways in which historical accounts (and evaluations) of him have been thoroughly entangled in a racial (black/mulatto) logic that his work was intent on questioning, but also, in a self-conscious move, to suggest some of the ways that this very same divisive logic continues, hauntingly, to make its presence felt in efforts at salvaging Chanlatte for a contemporary audience attuned to the world-historical importance of the Haitian Revolution and its unsettling aftermath.

Chris Bongie is Professor in the Department of English, Queen’s University. He is the author of three monographs, including the 2008 Friends and Enemies: The Scribal Politics of Post/Colonial Literature. He has translated and edited a number of works from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries that deal with the Haitian Revolution, the latest of these being a translation and critical edition of Haitian writer Baron de Vastey’s The Colonial System Unveiled, Liverpool University Press, 2014.

When: Friday, 3 October 2014, 2:30–4:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

Diane Schoemperlen poster

Diane Schoemperlen, writer in residence at Queen’s in 2012, reads from her new collection of short experimental fiction By the Book, published by Biblioasis. Born and raised in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Diane Schoemperlen has published several collections of short fiction and three novels, In the Language of Love (1994), Our Lady of the Lost and Found (2001), and At A Loss For Words (2008). Her 1990 collection, The Man of My Dreams, was shortlisted for both the Governor-General’s Award and the Trillium. Her collection Forms of Devotion: Stories and Pictures won the 1998 Governor-General’s Award for English Fiction. In 2008, she received the Marian Engel Award from the Writers’ Trust of Canada. She lives in Kingston, Ontario.

When: Tuesday, 7 October 2014, 1:00–2:30 pm

Where: Agnes Etherington Art Centre

Souvankham Thammavongsa poster

Souvankham Thammavongsa was born in the Nong Khai refugee camp in Thailand in 1978 and was raised and educated in Toronto. She has written three poetry books, all published by Pedlar Press. Her first, Small Arguments, won the ReLit prize. The collection Found was made into a short film by Paramita Nath and was screened at festivals worldwide, including TIFF, L. A. Shorts Fest, and Dok Leipzig. Light, her most recent collection, won the 2014 Trillium Prize for Poetry.

When: Monday, 20 October 2014, 1:00–2:30 pm

Where: Watson 517

Stan Dragland poster

Stan Dragland offers the annual Page Lecture, in Honour of Joanne Page. Winner of the Gabrielle Roy Prize and the bpNichol Chapbook Award, Stan Dragland is the founder of Brick magazine and Brick Books.

When: Tuesday, 21 October 2014, 2:30–4:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

The Medieval Seminar presents Ruth Wehlau (Department of English), “Lancelot’s Wounds: Female Desire and the Chivalric Economy in Malory’s Morte Darthur.” Refreshments will be served.

When: Wednesday, 22 October 2014, 4:00–5:30 pm

Where: Watson 517

Kris Manjapra (Department of History, Tufts University), “Outsourcing the Raj: German Science and the Consolidation of British India.” Presented as part of the Department’s Research Forum.

When: Thursday, 23 October 2014, 11:30 am–1:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

Indigenous Film Night: “Smoke Signals” (dir. Chris Eyre, USA). Hosted by Professor Heather Macfarlane. Open to the public.

When: Wednesday, 29 October 2014, 7:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

November 2014

Jean Comaroff (Department of History, Harvard University), “The Return of Khulekani Khumalo, Zombie Captive: Identity, Law, and Paradoxes of Personhood in the Postcolony.” Presented as part of the Department’s Research Forum.

When: Thursday, 6 November 2014, 5:30–7:00 pm

Where: Robert Sutherland Room, Policy Studies

Billeh Nickerson poster

Billeh Nickerson, Writer in Residence at the English Department in Winter 2008, returns to offer a reading. Born in Halifax and raised in Langley, BC, Billeh Nickerson is the author of the poetry collections The Asthmatic Glassblower, McPoems, Impact: The Titanic Poems, and his most recent, Artificial Cherry, as well as the humour collection Let Me Kiss It Better. He is also co-editor of Seminal: The Anthology of Canada’s Gay Male Poets, and past writer-in-residence at both Queen’s and Berton House in Dawson City, Yukon. He is also a silver medalist at the Canadian Gay Curling Championships, and Chair of the Creative Writing department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver.

When: Monday, 10 November 2014, 1:00–2:30 pm

Where: Watson 517

The Medieval Seminar presents a round table discussion on the present and future of medieval studies in the academy, hosted by Scott-Morgan Straker (Department of English). Refreshments will be served.

When: Wednesday, 12 November 2014, 4:00–5:30 pm

Where: Watson 517

Mary Nyquist poster

Mary Nyquist (University of Toronto) presents the Dolman Lecture, entitled, “Embodied Servility: Ritual Obeisance, Euro-colonialism, and Liberty.” Presented as part of the Department’s Research Forum, sponsored by the Alumni Fund and the Cappon Trust.

When: Friday, 14 November 2014, 2:30–4:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

Indigenous Film Night: “Kissed by Lightning” (dir. Shelley Niro, Canada). Hosted by Professor Petra Fachinger. Open to the public.

When: Wednesday, 19 November 2014, 7:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

Barbara Seeber poster

Barbara Seeber (Brock University), “Animals and the Country House Tradition in Mary Leapor’s ‘Crumble Hall’ and Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park.” Presented as part of the Department’s Research Forum, sponsored by the Alumni Fund and the Cappon Trust.

When: Friday, 21 November 2014, 2:30–4:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

January 2015

Indigenous Film Night: “Boy” (dir. Taika Waititi, New Zealand). Hosted by Professor Sam McKegney. Open to the public.

When: Wednesday, 28 January 2015, 7:00 pm

Where: Watson 517

March 2015

Indigenous Film Night: “Brand New Day” (dir. Rachel Perkins, Australia). Hosted by Professor Armand Garnet Ruffo. Open to the public.

When: Wednesday, 4 March 2015, 7:00 pm

Where: Watson 517