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Queen's University
 

Department of Global Development Studies

DEVS Course Offerings


100 and 200 Level 300 Level 400 Level Fourth Year Seminar Courses
DEVS 100 DEVS 300 DEVS 410 DEVS 492-001 Fall
DEVS 220 DEVS 305 DEVS 411 DEVS 492-002 Fall
DEVS 221 DEVS 311 DEVS 420 DEVS 493-003 Fall
DEVS 230 DEVS 320 DEVS 492-004 Fall
DEVS 240 DEVS 330 500 Level DEVS 492-005 Fall

DEVS 340 DEVS 501 DEVS 492-001 Winter
DEVS 350 DEVS 502 DEVS 492-002 Winter
DEVS 392-001 Winter DEVS 492-003 Winter

DEVS 392-002 Fall DEVS 492-004 Winter

DEVS 392-002 Winter DEVS 492-005 Winter



For information about our semester abroad program please visit the main office for Global Development Studies or send your questions to develstu@queensu.ca.

If you have questions about our directed reading course or are interested in the thesis option please contact the Undergraduate Chair at devs.ugchair@queensu.ca.

For more detailed course information please visit our faculty pages.  

DEVS 100/6.0 - Fall/Winter

Instructors:  David McDonald (Fall) and Karen Dubinsky (Winter)

Course Title: Canada and the "Third World"


Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada’s ties to the so-called third world will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.  Syllabus (PDF 744KB)  

 

NOTE Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/cds/courses/devs.html

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DEVS 220/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Robert Lovelace

Course Title: Introduction to Aboriginal Studies


An introduction to Aboriginal world view and culture organized on an historical basis, from Creation to 1969, emphasizing Aboriginal culture and experience in Canada. Aboriginal perspectives will be introduced through traditional teaching methods and contributions from elders and other community members. Syllabus (PDF 513KB)

 

NOTE Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/cds/courses/devs.html

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DEVS 221/3.0 - Winter

Instructor: Robert Lovelace

Course Title: Topics in Aboriginal Studies

 

Re-evaluation of conventional knowledge based on aboriginal world view and culture and the introduction of a decolonized perspective on contemporary issues. Guest speakers will provide detailed examinations of specific topics such as current issues in Aboriginal spirituality, art, education and politics.

 

NOTE Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/cds/courses/devs.html

 

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P) PREREQUISITE Level 2 or above. DEVS 220/3.0 or permission of the Department of Global Development Studies.

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DEVS 230/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: The Global Political Economy of Development


This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in global development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of ‘global development’.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, corporate social responsibility, and the role of NGOs.

 

After completing this course students will have a firm historical understanding of the evolution of economic development approaches in theory and practice and of the evolving and contested roles of institutions like the IMF, World Bank, and WTO in shaping “development”. In additions, students will be able to use the political economy perspective as a lens to identify the role of various forms of power in shaping the global political economy and be able to apply this lens effectively to the analysis of current events.

 

No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

 

PREREQUISITE DEVS 100/6.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

 

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DEVS 240/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Culture and Development

 

This course will explore how theories and practices of “development” are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It will do so by critically examining the debates about culture and its connection with development, both over time and in the contemporary context. The course starts by examining the cultural underpinnings of the dominant ideas of development, where the West constructed itself as the civilising force of the world and viewed the mass poverty of “Third World” peoples as a product of their traditions and cultural practices. From this viewpoint, culture, as tradition, was understood to impede development. The course will examine if such colonial perceptions still plague development studies today, and if so, the extent to which they have been challenged.

 

The course also interrogates how cultural assumptions are formed and how they shape the trajectory of development in the current phase of global neo-liberalism. Have these been challenged? Have new possibilities for social movements opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development or has culture itself become a justificatory tool of the neo-liberal development rule? These questions will be assessed by looking at thematic case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

 

After completing the course, the students should understand the main perspectives and debates in culture and development and be able to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses; have a sense of how competing perspectives are connected to particular periods, interests and concerns, and be able to develop a critical awareness of everyday events in the countries of the South, as reported, for example, in the media.

 

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

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DEVS 300/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:  Villia Jefremovas

Course Title: Cross-Cultural Research Methods

 

This course will introduce students to the preparation and design of cross-cultural research projects for international development work, to understand and use selected methods from a critical perspective, to provide a grasp of important elements underlying successful fieldwork and to learn to develop a development research proposal. We will cover research design, choosing the instruments, cross-checking and in-the-field analysis, entering the field, choosing the informants, analyzing the data and proposal writing. This will (a) familiarize students with the concepts, issues and processes in fieldwork; (b) introduce students to the process of developing a development research proposal and project (c) promote critical thinking; (d) develop writing proficiency and oral communication skills, through lectures, exercises, and written assignments.

 

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

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DEVS 305/6.0 –  Winter

Instructors:  Karen Dubinsky and Susan Lord

Course Title: Cuban Culture and Society


Devs 305, an interdisciplinary course 6.0 unit course which also counts towards degree requirements in the departments of Film and Media Studies, Sociology, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and History, will be taught over Winter and part of Spring term 2014. The session dates are as follows:

Session dates:

 

Queen's on campus session dates: 

  • Regular Winter Term starting Thursday January 7, 2016 (Three hours weekly - Eight weeks)

Queen's Intensive Pre-Departure Sessions: 

  • April 28 to May 5, 2016 (Six intensive three hours sessions:  9:30 AM until 12:30 PM - final daily schedule to be determined)

    Havana session dates: 

    • Saturday May 7, 2015 to Sunday May 22, 2016

    NOTES 

    1. Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel and accommodation while in Havana.
    2. Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office.
    3. Students are expected to attend a pre-departure orientation.
    4. Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website.

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any Arts and Science Plan.

     


    For more information see Global Development Studies department website
    http://www.queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate/workstudy/cuba-1.html
    See also Queen’s Cuban Culture and Society course page on Facebook www.facebook.com/QueensCubanCultureAndSocietyCourse.

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    DEVS 311/3.0 – NOT OFFERED IN 2015/2016

    Instructor:   Marcus Taylor

    Course Title: Labour and Global Development


    Explores the relationships between the production of goods, the lives and livelihoods of workers, and socio-economic development at local, national and global levels. Issues include: the international division of labour; global commodity chains; technological change; labour markets; informal sector; genders in production; unions and labour rights.  Syllabus (PDF 170KB)

     

    PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0.

     

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    DEVS 320/3.0 - Fall

    Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

    Course Title:  AIDS, Power, and Poverty


    HIV/AIDS remains one of the most pressing development issues in the world today.  This course examines the cultural, political, economic, and other social factors that contribute to its transmission and intractability, and which help to explain the differential impact of the disease upon societies worldwide.  Particular attention is paid to the ways that specific social/sexual identities and practices arising from inequitable class, gender, race, and ethnic relations, affect the prevalence of HIV, the ability to contain its spread, and the human costs that it entails. 

     

    PREREQUISITES    One of:  DEVS 100/6.0, DEVS 200/3.0, DEVS 210/3.0,  DEVS 220/3.0, DEVS 221/3.0, DEVS 230/3.0, HLTH 101/3.0; and third-year standing.

     

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    DEVS 330/3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:   Mark Hostetler

    Course Title: Technology and Development

     

    An introduction to the socio-economic, cultural and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development process in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. Student project groups will focus on particular realms of technology in development and the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

     

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (registration in any DEVS Plan or registration in any Applied Science Program), or permission of the Department.

     

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    DEVS 340/3.0 – Fall

    Instructor:   Meaghan Frauts

    Course Title: Theories of Development


    Provides students with an overview of theories that underpin the development enterprise, and critiques of development, through the use of primary texts and critical appraisals. Syllabus

     

    PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

     

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    DEVS 350/3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:  Reena Kukreja

    Course Title:  Gender and Development


    The course seeks to critically examine how contemporary neo-liberal policies impact upon gender relations. To this end, the course has two sections: the first part of the course provides a theoretical and conceptual grounding by reviewing debates around Women & Development and Gender & Development, while part two examines gendered impact of neo-liberal policies and development processes during the current period of globalization.

     

    PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0.

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    DEVS 392-001 3.0 – Winter
    Instructor:  Mohammed Abdou

    Course Title:  War of Dreams:  Social Movements of the Middle East Today

     

    This course will focus on the insurrectionary movements for social change that are currently sweeping across the Middle East, from Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya to Bahrain, Syria, Yemen and Saudi Arabia. These movements, which have been seen as part of a broad political ‘awakening’, have led to what has been called ‘the Arab Spring’ and, according to some Western commentators, also portend a coming ‘Islamist Winter’. In order to better understand these forces for social change, this course will trace their roots in Middle Eastern history, European colonialism and resulting anti-colonial struggles. We will also engage with the theory and practice of current and previous social movements, with particular attention to the relevance of Islam, in local, national, and global contexts.

     

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

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    DEVS 392-002 3.0 – Fall

    Instructor:  Ayca Tomac

    Course Title:  Alliance Politics, Solidarity Movements in the Global Context


     

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.


     

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    DEVS 392-002 3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:  Deniz Zorlu

    Course Title: Popular Culture and Development

     

    How is the concept of development addressed, re-negotiated and contested in popular culture? This course explores representations of development and their societal effects through a close textual analysis of particular genres and forms of popular productions – such as feature length films, TV soap operas, reality shows, commercials, photography etc. – from different parts of the world. A focus will be on the differential and gendered ways in which the neoliberal development discourses function in the field of cultural productions and interpellate their audiences.

     

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

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    DEVS 392-004/3.0 – Summer

    Instructor: Nick Montgomery
    Course Title: Cultivating Alternatives to Empire


    This course will involve an 8-week online component, in which students will participate in discussions on Moodle, and a 10-day intensive component, in which students will be involved in classroom discussions and hands-on, participatory, off-campus activities.

     

    Broadly, this course explores the theory and practice of alternatives to Empire, with a focus on efforts to cultivate more sustainable, non-dominating relationships between land and people.


    Readings will include a variety of academic and non-academic perspectives on capitalism and Empire, colonialism, heteropatriarchy, and white supremacy, as well as efforts to resist, recover, and create other relationships, including alternative food systems, permaculture, feminism, resistance to resource extraction, indigenous resurgence, de-institutionalizing learning, and consensus-based decision-making. Some of the 10-day in-class component will take place on the Queen’s campus in a classroom setting, while the rest will include a 5- day field trip north of Kingston and surrounding areas, visiting local initiatives related to course themes and exploring the practice of some of these alternatives.

     

    PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

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    DEVS 410/6.0 Winter

    Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

    Course Title: Work Placement in Development Studies


    Provides students with first-hand experience working with an agency involved in international development, either in Canada or abroad. The placement will normally be for 10-20 weeks, to be negotiated with the sponsoring agency. Students are required to attend preparatory meetings, prepare a work-study proposal, a research paper on the placement and maintain a journal on a continuing basis while on their placement. In addition to academic requirements, students are required to enroll in the Queen's Emergency Support Program, attend pre-departure orientation and complete Queen's Off-Campus Activity Safety Policy (OCASP) requirements.

     

    NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with participation in this course.


    PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Head of Global Development Studies.

     

    COREQUISITE DEVS 411/3.0 (Under special circumstances a student can substitute DEVS 502/3.0 (Directed Readings in Development Studies) for DEVS 411/3.0. Permission for the latter may be granted to students who have completed all other degree requirements, and who do not need to return to Queen's University campus following completion of their placement. Students must seek prior approval from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies for this option).

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 432/6.0.

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    DEVS 411/3.0 Fall 

    Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

    Course Title: Post Placement Seminar in Development Studies


    Required for students who have successfully completed the course requirements for DEVS 410. The course will provide a forum for students to debrief and to critically examine their placement experience. Evaluation based on presentation, participation, journal synthesis and a final report.

     

    PREREQUISITE DEVS 410/6.0 and Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

     

    EXCLUSIONS No more than 1 course from DEVS 411/3.0; DEVS 432/6.0.

     

    ONE-WAY EXCLUSION May not be taken with or after DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

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    DEVS 420/3.0 – Fall

    Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

    Course Title: Study Placement in Development Studies

     

    Participation in an organized educational or cultural exchange, either

    i) one term of studies at a developing-country university, or

    ii) an exchange program in a developing-country setting with an organization such as Canada World Youth or Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute for at least 6 weeks.

     

    Students are required to prepare a work-study proposal, a risk assessment of their placement and attend a pre-departure orientation. Assessment will also be based on a journal and final report.

     

    NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with this course.

     

    PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 432/6.0.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

     

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    DEVS 492-001/DEVS 862-001 (seminar)/3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:  Collen Davison

    Course Title:  A Critical Examination of Global Health Interventions

     

    This course is a critical examination of global health development interventions. Global health is the area of study, research and practice that places priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. The course will begin with a review of the principles of global health (definitions, underpinning values and concepts). It will then move on to look at global health development actors, key organizations and the structures in which they work. The field of global health intervention is diverse and can be contentious. After reviewing principles of intervention science and various evaluation lenses, students will select a specific global health intervention to critically examine in more detail.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-001W/3.0, DEVS 862-001W/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-001/DEVS 862-001 (Seminar)/3.0 – Fall 

    Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

    Course Title: Development and the Global Agrofood System


    There can be little doubt that the current era is witnessing dramatic change in the global production and consumption of food. In some respects this represents that continuation of previous trends. However, in number of important ways agricultural restructuring in the late twentieth century appears completely new.  Using a diverse disciplinary perspective, this course analyses key aspects of contemporary changes in the global agro-food system. Topics covered will range from industrialization and corporate control of food and farming, the geography of more ‘flexible’ forms of manufacturing and service provisions, feminization of agricultural labour, localized and place-based agriculture, non-agricultural uses of agro-food resources, financialization of food, food sovereignty to new landscapes of consumption, changing forms of political organization and protests and the relationship between food and culture, specifically how communities and societies identify and express themselves through food.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-002/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-001F/3.0, DEVS 862F-001/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-002/DEVS 862-002 (seminar)/3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:  Marc Epprecht    

    Course Title: Degrowth in Africa: Thinking outside the 'development' box


    The concept of degrowth is generally applied to “overdeveloped” countries in the Global North. It suggests strategies to bring down greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental stresses in a democratically managed, globally co-ordinated manner while improving people’s quality of life in non-consumerist terms. The assumption is that degrowth focused in the Global North will offset growth needed in the Global South if the latter is to catch up in basic infrastructure and safety nets. In the long-term, reducing global inequalities will then allow mutual, fair degrowth towards a steady state economy for all (no depletion of non-renewable biophysical resources). This course challenges us to consider how degrowth may be applied in African contexts immediately. It begins with an examination of the complexities of degrowth theory and a short history of growth/development in Africa. It then asks students to assess case studies of specific African cities facing some of the most extreme development challenges in the world today. The goal is to creatively design plausible degrowth initiatives for those cities using appropriate technological, political, cultural or other available resources

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-002/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-002W/3.0, DEVS 862-002W/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-003/DEVS 862-003 - WINTER

    Instructor:   David McDonald

    Course Title: Privatization and Its Discontents


    This course reviews the theory and practice of public versus private provision of essential services such as water, electricity and health care, with a focus on countries in the South. It begins with a theoretical examination of the meanings of public and private, followed by a review of the history of networked services in the North and South, examining their initial transition from private to municipal and national ownership, followed by a conversion back to private ownership beginning again in the 1970s. We explore the rationale for this latest round of privatizations (and its various manifestations) and the institutions and mechanisms behind this trend. This is followed by a survey of critiques of privatization, and a review of emerging public alternatives for service delivery, ranging from ‘the commons’ to contemporary forms of socialism, as well as the people and organizations driving these developments.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-003/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-003W/3.0, DEVS 862-003W/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-002/DEVS 862-002 (seminar)/3.0 – FALL

     

    Instructor:  Mark Vardy

    Course Title: Climate Change and Global Development


    Climate change is a vital concern. Not only is it negatively impacting the environment that sustains all of human life, but the consequences of climate change are not distributed equally. While developed nations are primarily responsible for the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, the impacts of climate change are experienced disproportionally in the Global South. An increasing number of scholars and activists argue that climate change should be understood as an opportunity to engage with progressive social transformations that address the social, cultural, political and economic roots of inequality within and between nations.


    This course draws from a range of academic disciplines including history, sociology and science studies to engage with the ethical, political and philosophical issues pertaining to contemporary responses to climate change. The course begins with the history of climate science and the politics of North American media coverage of climate change. Then, to understand the multiple ways that climate change is impacting the Global South as well as how dominant actors are responding to such impacts, the course addresses the discourse of resilience, adaptation and vulnerability. The course concludes with case studies of issues related to climate change, including food security, migration, and the global climate justice movement.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-002/3.0 .

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-007/3.0, DEVS 862-007/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-003/DEVS 862-003/3.0 - Fall

    Instructor:  Richard Day

    Course Title:  The Global Insurrection   

     

    From the ‘Arab Spring’ to the suburbs of France, from the Gezi Park encampment in Turkey to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement, people all over the world are taking to the streets in defiance of their governments, in actions that go beyond mere protest in intensity, duration, and effects upon the societies in which they occur. Although these insurrections only rarely result in ‘the people’ taking state power, as in the classical understanding of insurrection, they do point the way to new ways of organizing our lives, based on decision-making through assemblies, horizontal structures of power, and meeting basic needs without the ‘help’ of states and corporations. They propose, and experiment with, concrete alternatives to the discourse of development, in general, and global neoliberalism in particular.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-003/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-003F/3.0, DEVS 862-003F/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-004/DEVS 862-004 - 3.0 – FALL

    Instructor:    Villia Jefremovas

    Course Title:  Indigenous People in International Comparative Perspective

     

    • Who is indigenous and why?
    • What rights should indigenous peoples have?
    • How does our understanding of indigeneity affect the lives of indigenous peoples and their rights?
    • What do these debates mean for development policy and practice?

    In 2007, indigenous peoples gained the right to determine their own development and the development of their lands, territories and resources through the ratification of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Article 23 & 32). New international forums and forms of legislation have recognized the rights of indigenous peoples to control over their cultural, economic and political institutions, and their ownership of land and resources. These new initiatives have often released a storm of controversy. Debates have raged over what over what constitutes ‘indigeneity,’ who is indigenous, and how to reconcile group rights within liberal democracies based on individual rights.

     

    To address these issues and debates, we will look at issues concerning indigenous peoples from a comparative perspective, using examples from both settlers states, in which pre-existing populations have been displaced by large scale migrations of culturally different populations, such as Canada, US, and Australia; and those in which the majority populations and indigenous populations have been differentiated by the processes of the processes of resistance, assimilation and conquest, such as the Philippines, Indonesia, Tanzania, and Guatemala.

     

    We will consider the debates over the definition of indigenous identity and indigenous rights from a historical and comparative perspective, internally and in relation to mainstream groups; the relationship of indigenous peoples to the state, NGOs as well as to dominant cultures within the nation-state; national policies put into place for indigenous peoples and the impact of these policies on internal dynamics of indigenous groups; the link that new legislation has made between indigenous peoples and the environment and the implications of this link for indigenous peoples.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-003/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION no more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-004F/3.0, DEVS 862-004F/3.0.

    DEVS 492-004/DEVS 862-004 - 3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:    Villia Jefremovas

    Course Title: Rural Development  


    What is the role of rural development in the development process? The importance of agriculture and natural resource management in transforming society has been an on-going debate historically, academically, and has been central to development thought.

    • Starting from the premise that the definition of development determines the nature of the interventions in rural development, we will delve into the role of theories and assumptions in delineating the nature of the problems to be solved by ‘development.’
    • We will consider the role of theory and assumptions in constructing policies and interventions and in outlining the geographic and political arena within which those projects are effected.
    • We will explore the ways in which the role of the beneficiaries of development/policy and the role of the state, as well as the roles of individuals, communities and NGOs in development, are shaped by theory and assumptions.
    • We will investigate the outcomes of these interventions -intended and unintended- looking at successes and failures.
    • We will reflect on the limits of decision and choice, drawing from commonalities and differences over time and place.
    • Finally we will look at these issues and examples in the context of the interactions between economics, politics, society, and culture using a political economy perspective, that is to say, in terms of the relationships between the Global North and the Global South, between genders and between people of different socio-economic and culturally defined strata.

    This course will not view development as if it began in 1945, but will see it as beginning in the late 18th c in Europe, the expansion of the colonial world and with the development of capitalism, during which time the first purposive plans to transform society were implemented in Europe, North America and in the European colonial empires, so colonial policy as well as post-independence policies will be an integral aspect of our discussion, as will the central role of European social, political and economic thought.

     

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-004/3.0 .

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-004W/3.0, DEVS 862-004W/3.0.

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    DEVS 492-005/DEVS 862-005 (seminar)/3.0 – Fall

    Instructor:  Jesse Hembruff  

    Course Title: The Political Economy of Debt and Development

     

    This seminar will examine one of the most enduring problems of global development finance, namely: debt and debt crises. Theoretically, the course would be guided by analyses from Critical Political Economy and Development Studies to help unpack the ‘common sense’ and mainstream representations of credit and debt as apolitical, technical, and neutral to reveal the complex and contested social relations of power between various private and public actors. In so doing, the course is aimed at examining and understanding questions of power and contestation inherent to debt relations across a variety of national spaces and temporal frames. In this sense, the analytical foundations of the seminar will build on and extend the content of DEVS 230.

     

    The theoretical framing of the seminar will then be used to explore various topics of debt and development, which will include:

    • The Global Governance of Finance and Poverty: Shifting Roles of the IMF and World Bank
    • Managing Sovereign Debt Crisis and Vulture Funds in the New Millennium: The Case of Argentina
    • Neoliberalism and “Accumulation by Dispossession”: Understanding the Geographies of Financialization
    • The Sub-prime Housing Crisis in the United States, with a gender and racial focus
    • The Politics of Austerity and its Social Implications
    • The Triple Dimensions of the 2008 ‘Great Recession’: Food, Fuel and Financial Crises
    • The Politics of Financial Inclusion in the global South: Microcredit and Microfinance
    • The Politics of Financial Inclusion in the global North: Payday Lending
    • The Sovereign Debt crises of the Eurozone, with a focus on Greece and Portugal

    Taught concurrently with DEVS 862-005/3.0.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-005F/3.0, DEVS 492_005F/3.0.


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    DEVS 492-004/DEVS 862-004 (seminar)/3.0 – Winter

    Instructor:  David McDonald  

    Course Title: Cities and Urbanization in the South

     

    Over 50% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, up from less than 15% in 1900.  This rapid urbanization is expected to continue for several decades, with the majority of urban growth taking place in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Cities have also become engines of economic growth and social pluralization, acting as conduits for – and generators of – larger global transformations.  From music to foreign investments to infrastructure development, cities are key sites of socio-economic and political change (and resistance) and will continue to grow in importance in the future.

     

    This course examines cities and urbanization in countries in the South, looking at similarities and differences between and across regions, and the extent to which they connect (or not) with urban areas in the North. We begin with an historical and comparative overview of the meaning of, and trends within, urbanization. This is followed by a review of the main theoretical frameworks used to understand urbanization and urban policy. From these conceptual lenses we move to more concrete debates about the emerging phenomenon of ‘global cities’, planning and informality, urban ecologies and environmental justice, gender and racialized dynamics in cities, and the privatization of city space and services. We conclude with a look at growing efforts to (re)claim the city and debates around the meanings and forms of ‘public’ alternatives to urban development strategies.

     

    PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

     

    EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492-004W/3.0, DEVS 862-004W/3.0.

     

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    DEVS 501/6.0 Honours Thesis in Development Studies

    The course will involve a critical review of the literature on a clearly-defined topic relevant to development, a synthesis of ideas, and a final thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

     

    NOTE The student must pay a modest fee for the binding of the departmental copy. The estimated cost is $20.

     

    NOTE The student must identify a willing supervisor from DEVS or a cognate department and receive permission of the Department of Global Development Studies.

     

    PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

     

    EXCLUSION DEVS 450/3.0.

     

    501 Approval form (PDF 7KB)

     

    501 Course outline (PDF 28 KB)

     

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    DEVS 502/3.0 Directed Readings in Development Studies

    This course enables a student or a group of students to explore a body of literature on a selected topic in development. The focus may be by theme, by region or by academic approach and can span the humanities, social sciences and environmental sciences. NOTE The students are responsible for approaching a professor with whom they wish to work and who is willing to undertake this project.

     

    PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

     

    502 Approval form (PDF 7KB)

     

    502 Course outline (PDF 21KB)

     

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    Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000