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Queen's University
 

Global Development Studies Graduate Courses

Course Numbers
801 809/492 891
802 810 892
803/493 815 893
804/494 830 894
805/495 850 895
806/496 880 898
807/497 885 899
808/498 890
DEVS - 801*  The Political Economy of Development 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the relationship between political economy and the ideas and practices of development.  The course grounds students in core theories, both classical and contemporary.  It then examines key themes and controversies to illustrate the relationships between political economy and development practice.

 

This is a mandatory course for all graduate students in Global Development Studies.

 

Three term hours; Fall. D. McDonald

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DEVS - 802*  The Cultural Politics of Development

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the cultural politics of development in historical and contemporary perspective.  The course focuses on narratives of development and their relationship to social and political movements in the South and North.  Themes include the ideas of tradition, modernity and progress; colonialism, nationalism and liberation; and the gendered and racialised politics of development.

 

This is a mandatory course for all graduate students in Global Development Studies.

 

Three term ‐ hours; Winter. D. Da Costa

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DEVS - 803*/493* Topics in International Development - African Renaissance 

2014-2015 Topic:  The 'African Renaissance' in Comparative Perspective 

  

This course critically assesses the premises and promises of the "African Renaissance" of democratic political transitions, accelerating rates of economic growth, and "demographic dividend."  It begins with a critical overview of the history of underdevelopment under colonial and neo-colonial conditions, including through unequal relations in the production of knowledge about Africa.  Students then examine a series of specific contemporary or proposed development strategies/tools including: public versus private service delivery, the future of colonial borders, the role of tourism, the nature of urbanization, gender and sexual rights, information technology, and Chinese aid/trade.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduatestudents may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult with Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Winter. M. Epprecht

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DEVS - 804*/494*  Topics in International Development -  Global Governance

2014-2015 Topic:  Global Governance and Development

 

Scope And Objectives:

Global governance is the sum of many ways individuals and institutions, public and private, manage their common affairs. It is the continuing process through which conflicting or diverse interests may be accommodated and cooperative action may be taken. It includes formal institutions…as well as informal arrangements that people and institutions have either agreed to or perceive to be in their interest.

Commission on Global Governance, Our Global Neighbourhood (1995)

 

The above definition of global governance has been widely employed by scholars, policymakers, journalists, and activists to describe how the world economy has been ‘managed’. Over the past decade, global governance has become so central to the understanding of our contemporary world that universities have begun to offer graduate degrees and certificate programmes in this field, e.g., http://globalgovernance.uwaterloo.ca/. There is even an academic journal dedicated to the study of global governance (i.e., www.acuns.org/globalgove) and numerous websites, e.g., www.glogov.org/

 

Like many fashionable terms in the social world, global governance has all too often escaped critical evaluation. Although there is no consensus on the meaning of this term, it seems to rest on at least two conventional wisdoms. First, globalization is an unstoppable, omnipotent, and neutral (desirable) force stemming from some sort of external source (such as the market). Second, there appear to be pre-existing and commonly shared values and norms across various cultural, political, economic, and social spaces. These sentiments on global governance run through the discourses of many powerful international organizations and fora, such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, the World Economic Summit, Group of Twenty (G20) Summits, Global Climate Summits, the United Nations Global Compact, and so forth – all of which have immediate impact on the daily lives of hundreds of millions of people in the global North and global South.

 

Despite its popularity and centrality to contemporary economic, environmental, social and political life, global governance remains under-theorized. For example, we might ask: Who benefits from global governance? Whose values are being promoted, and why? Who is to be governed, and why? What roles have (neoliberal) states and markets played in the construction and reproduction of global governance? Which interests and ‘spaces’ are excluded, and why? How are we to make sense of global governance in the larger, multi-disciplinary frame of global political economy? And, finally, how are we to understand the relevance of global governance with regard to North-South relations, i.e., questions of development?

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduatestudents may not take more than three such mixed courses.  Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult with Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Fall. S. Soederberg

*Please note: DEVS MA students may not take both DEVS 804 and DEVS 893. The Department recommends taking DEVS 893 as it is a graduate-only course.

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DEVS - 805*/495*  Topics in International Development - Race in Development

2014-2015 Topic:  Race in Development 

 

This course provides students with a critical historical perspective and the theoretical tools to analyze the integral role racial and ethnic differences play within capitalist development. From the colonial and postcolonial reproduction and contestation of domination, hierarchy, and inequality, to development’s recent turn to race, ethnicity, and culture as a means of inclusion, we explore the diverse ways such "differences" get deployed within development discourses and practices. The course is especially attentive to the ways in which race and ethnicity structure power, privilege, and knowledge production, and considers the implications this has for re-thinking development theory and practice.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Winter. A.E. Da Costa

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DEVS - 806*/496  Topics in International Development - Climate Change and Development 

2014-2015 Topic:  Climate Change and Global Development

 

Over the past decade, the spectre of anthropogenic climate change has increasingly cast a shadow over debates in development studies.  It is widely accepted that climate change mitigation – the reduction of CO2 emissions – will not be rapid enough in timeframe or sufficient enough in scale to avoid significant global warming.  In its impact on hydroclimatic phenomena, climate change will have manifest social implications particularly in regions of the global South characterised by significant dependence on agriculture for livelihoods, insufficient physical infrastructure and overburdened public institutions.  In response, measures to promote climate change adaptation are seen as requiring immediate mainstreaming within national policymaking and international development initiatives to safeguard material wellbeing and social identity.  There is significant disagreement, however, on what successful adaptation involves, how it should be fostered and who should promote and finance it.  This course overviews these debates in both the academic and policy literature.  We examine the many projected impacts of climate change, their differentiated impact upon societies, and current public policy responses to them.  With a specific focus on questions of equity, we examine how vulnerability to climate change impacts is socially constructed and how such vulnerability manifests itself in different social spaces, from the rural to the urban.  As such, the course seeks to balance focus on the broad analytical questions surrounding vulnerability, resilience and adaptation with case studies drawn from a wide range of countries across the global South.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Fall. M. Taylor

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DEVS - 807*/497*  Topics in International Development - Education and Development

2014-2015 Topic:  Education: A Contradictory Resource

 

Following international conferences in the 1990s, development research and governance institutions joined in the call for Education for All characterized by a massive institutional push to increase primary school enrolment in the developing world.  This course takes a critical and theoretical look at one of the most powerful and enduring ideas of development —that education is a first step to progress and freedom from poverty.  A range of social theorists such as Paul Willis, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Paulo Freire, Martha Nussbaum, and Amartya Sen help explore whether schooling is an inevitable good, a tool for hegemonic domination, or a contradictory resource.  Rather than view education as an autonomous historical force we situate education in social and subjective power relations.  We read accounts of various contexts of schooling from working-class British schools,  Dalit schooled men in north India, postcolonial schooling, and educating development workers.  Each context and experience of schooling generates questions about the multiple ideological and practical purposes, uses, and outcomes of education—from learning to divide the world to producing the good citizen and worker. Understanding the significant role of education in reproducing inequality and imperialism is juxtaposed with explorations of philosophies and existing practices of critical, transformative pedagogies.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Winter. D. Da Costa

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DEVS - 808*/498*  Topics in International Development  - Autonomy-Oriented Movements

2014-2015 Topic:  Autonomy-Oriented Social Movements in the Americas: Changing the World Without Taking Power?

 

This course will focus on the theory, strategy, and tactics that guide certain 'autonomy-oriented' movements for social change in the Americas, i.e., those that work within and against, as well as outside of, the dominant neoliberal order, to create sustainable alternatives to it.  It will include in-depth study of examples drawn from both settler and indigenous societies, as well as those working on the precarious boundaries between them.

 

In order to understand the specificity of autonomy-oriented movements, the course will begin with a quick overview of the colonization of the Americas, as well as a discussion of social movement theory, strategy, and tactics, using a rough periodization based on the dominant mode of social change advocated during each period: from revolution-oriented (modern marxism, anarchism, anarchist feminism 1850s-1950s) to reform oriented  ('new' social movements of the 1960s-1980s) to (autonomy-oriented) 'newest' social movements of the 1990s and 2000s.

We will draw primarily from autonomist marxist, postcolonial, anarchist, feminist, and indigenist theory and practice, with a particular focus on anarcha-indigenism, an emerging discourse that explores resonances and dissonances between the latter three traditions. Case studies will include the Zapatista autonomous zones, land reclamations by the Tyendinaga Mohawk and Six Nations at Caledonia, autonomous neighbourhoods in Argentina, and the unitierra 'campuses' in Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico.

 

We will explore various questions that have been raised by the theory and practice of these movements, such as: the debate over the efficacy of autonomy-oriented vs. counter-hegemonic strategies for social change; the need for 'unity' vs. 'plurality' in making another world possible; the centrality of some particular oppression, such as class, vs. a politics of anti-oppression; failures and successes in the formation of concrete solidarities across groups and movements; the viability/value of insurrectionary practices.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Fall. R. Day

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DEVS - 809*/492*  Topics in International Development - Global Agro-Food System

2014-2015 Topic:  Development and the Global Agro-Food System

 

There can be little doubt that the current era is witnessing dramatic change in the global production and consumption of food.  In some respects this represents a continuation of previous trends.  In number of important ways, however, agricultural restructuring in the late twentieth century appears completely new.  Using a diverse disciplinary perspective, this course analyzes key aspects of contemporary changes in the global agro-food system.  Topics covered will range from industrialization and corporate control of food and farming, the geography of more ‘flexible’ forms of manufacturing and service provisions, feminization of agricultural labour, localized and place-based agriculture, non-agricultural uses of agro-food resources, food democracy and sovereignty to new landscapes of consumption, changing forms of political organisation and protests and the relationship between food and culture, specifically how communities and societies identify and express themselves through food.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than two such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult with Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Fall. P. Kumar

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DEVS - 810*  Uneven Development: Global Divisions of Labour and Consumption

Not offered 2014 ‐ 2015.

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DEVS - 815*  The Global Political Economy of Finance and Development

Not offered 2014 ‐ 2015.

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DEVS - 830*/499  Encountering Rural Development: A Critical Reading

This course is a survey of selected issues in rural development, natural resource management, and highlights the role of communities, NGOs, the State and indigenous peoples in the form that development takes. Starting from the premise that what we consider to be development and how it is to be achieved determines the nature of the interventions in rural development, we will consider the role of assumptions in defining the nature of trusteeship; the problems to be solved by ‘development;’ the construction of the projects or policies; the boundaries within which those projects are effected; the conceptualization of the beneficiaries of development/policy -discussing the ‘community’ and the ‘individual’- and the conceptualization of the state and authority in the models under discussion. In doing so we will also reflect on the impact of these assumptions on the outcome of interventions, -intended and unintended, successes and failures- and examine the limits of decision and choice, drawing from commonalities and differences over time and place. We will look at these issues and examples in the context of the interactions between economics, politics, society, and culture using a political economy perspective, that is to say, in terms of the relationships between north and south, between genders and between people of different socio-economic strata. This course will not view development as if it began in 1945, but will see it as beginning in the late 18th century in Europe and the colonial world during which time the first purposive plans to transform society were implemented, so colonial policy will be an integral aspect of our discussion.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult with Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term ‐ hours; Winter. V. Jefremovas.

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DEVS - 850*  Professional Seminar in Development Studies 

This course provides a forum to discuss practical, ethical and methodological issues in conducting development research and writing, including major research papers, thesis work, and grant applications.

 

All Global Development Studies MA students will be enrolled in this course.

 

Monthly meetings; FW terms. M. Taylor

 

 

 

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DEVS - 880*  Marketization of Debt, Nature and Development 

 Not offered 2014 - 2015.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 885*  Global Migration/Development

Not offered 2014‐2015.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 890*  Directed Readings in Development Studies

Students whose proposed research lies outside the realm (thematic or regional) of regular course offerings may choose this option. In consultation with a willing supervisor, students must develop a unifying title, course description, and reading list of 2‐4 key texts for each of 5‐6 set topics leading toward an agreed upon set of assignments.  There is an expectation that a minimum of one substantive written assignment will be required.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 891*  Fieldwork Preparation / De-Briefing

A summer-term elective for students in the two-year thesis stream. The course will enable students to devote more time in planning and pre‐departure preparation for their fieldwork by giving them course relief in the winter term. It will also provide an effective de‐briefing experience upon return, either in conjunction with the post activity reflection course for our senior undergraduates

(DEVS 411*) or through other public engagement such as guest lectures to undergraduate classes, or talks to extra‐curricular groups.

 

The course will be assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 892*  Special Topics in Global Development Studies - Field Research 

This course focuses on specific topics related to global development studies.  Special topics are offered under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise.

 

2014-2015 Topic:  Field Research

 

The course will introduce graduate students to qualitative field research through a combination of coursework and fieldwork. The course will cover research design, proposal writing, research ethics, qualitative research methods - concentrating on interviewing and observation, and data analysis, in order to provde students with a graps of important elements underlying successful fieldwork design, implementation and reporting.

 

Three term ‐ hours; Winter. V. Jefremovas 

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 893*/POLS 891*  Special Topics in Global Development Studies - the Aid Industry 

This course focuses on specific topics related to global development studies. Special topics are offered under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise.

 

2014-2015 Topic: Global Political Economy of Slums, Development and Governance

 

Since 2008, for the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population live in urban centres. At the same time, the World Bank has recently claimed that the most significant and politically explosive problem of the next century will be urban poverty. With the wider ambit of the emerging Sustainable Development post-2015 Agenda, this course will explore key features of urban poverty from a variety of disciplinary lenses – all of which will be broadly based in global political economy. We will explore a variety of issues and problems of urban poverty in both the global North and global South such as questions of power vis-à-vis class and gender, the nature of neoliberalization, social reproduction, informality and surplus populations, slum rehabilitation, natural disaster management, the aid industry, as well as the role of consumer credit including payday loans and microfinance. Connecting all these issues, and thus the nexus of our investigations into the variegated landscape of urban poverty in the New Millennium, is why, how, and to what extent vulnerable populations are included or excluded from the provision of shelter and housing in global development governance.   Three term - hours; Fall. S. Soederberg.

 

Three term - hours; Winter. S. Soederberg.

 

*Please note: DEVS MA students may not take both DEVS 804 and DEVS 893. The Department recommends taking DEVS 893 as it is a graduate-only course.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 894*  Special Topics in Global Development Studies

This course focuses on specific topics related to global development studies. Special topics are offered under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise.

 

2014-2015 Topic: Cities and Urbanization in the South

 

More than 50% of the world’s population now lives in urban areas, up from about 3% in 1900.  This rapid urbanization is expected to continue over the next two decades, with the majority of growth taking place in Africa, Asia, and, to a lesser extent, Latin America. Cities have also become engines of economic growth and social pluralization, acting as conduits for – and generators of – larger global transformations.  From music to foreign investments to infrastructure development, cities are key sites of socio-economic and political change (and resistance thereto) and will only grow in importance in the future.  This course explores the linkages between urbanization and globalization with a focus on cities in the South.  We look at similarities and differences between these cities, and how they connect (or not) with urban areas in the North.

 

The course begins with an historical and comparative overview of urbanization, followed by a review of the main theoretical frameworks for explaining and understanding urbanization trends. From this theoretical foundation we move to more concrete debates over the role of the World Bank and the UN in urban policy making, the privatization of municipal services such as water and sanitation, the challenges of environmental sustainability in cities, the rise of new social movements and recent efforts at participatory budgeting and other ‘anti-neoliberal’ forms of governance in cities in the South.

 

A mixed senior undergraduate/graduate level course with limited space for graduate students. Graduate students may not take more than three such mixed courses. Graduate enrolment opens after the undergraduate enrolment period (consult with Graduate Assistant).

 

Three term - hours; Winter. D. McDonald.

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 895*  Special Topics in Global Development Studies

This course focuses on specific topics related to global development studies. Special topics are offered under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise.

 

2014-2015 Topic: Indigenous Public Art and The Aesthetics of Indigenous Activism

 

This course examines the political interventions made by Indigenous art and performance situated in public spaces across North America. Drawing upon theories that assert the fundamentally political nature of aesthetics, the course questions the role alienation and enchantment play in a wide range of public art forms including monuments, flash mobs, community-arts practice, sound walks and site-specific performance.

 

Three term - hours; Winter. D. Robinson

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 898*  Master's Research Paper

Students will complete a library‐based major research project (MRP) of 40‐60 pages. The MRP will deal with a specific interdisciplinary question directly relevant to Global Development Studies, which may be thematic or theoretical in nature or focus on peoples or places generally associated with the Global South in the context of relations with the Global North.

 

PREREQUISITE: Permission of Graduate Chair in consultation with a willing faculty supervisor, plus completion of two mandatory and four elective DEVS

or DEVS‐ eligible courses

 

 

 

 

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DEVS - 899*  Master's Thesis

Research leading to a dissertation of 70‐100 pages will usually involve the collection and analysis of primary data and be of publishable quality. Such data could include oral interviews, archival and other documentary sources, in some cases collected through field work.

 

PREREQUISITE: Permission of Graduate Chair in consultation with a willing faculty supervisor, plus completion of two mandatory and two elective DEVS or DEVS‐eligible courses.

 

 

 

 

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