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Commerce

Not every course listed in this Calendar is offered every year.  For the most up-to-date information on course offerings, students are advised to view the 2011-2012 course timetable on the web at www.queensu.ca/registrar or consult with the Commerce office.

Enrolment Limits and Cancellation of Under Enrolled Courses

The Commerce Program reserves the right to limit enrolment in any class which becomes oversubscribed, even if the course description does not indicate a limited enrolment.  As well, under enrolled courses may be cancelled.

 

Course of Instruction Legend

COMM      Prefix

*               term-length course (3.0 units)

              course is open to Commerce students only

^               courses required for CA designation

COMM-103*† Business Management and Communication
This course introduces students to the main functional areas of business and demonstrates how these areas interact to produce products and/or services in an economically viable manner.  The courses also assists students in developing an understanding of the nature of the modern corporate enterprise in Canadian and international contexts and of the tasks, practices, and responsibilities of its managers.  This course, via its business communication component (25% of the course), is further designed to provide students with the conventional formats of business writing (letters, memos, proposals, etc.) and the opportunity to develop their business communications planning and writing skills.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-104*† Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
This required second year course provides an introduction to the related fields of business ethics and corporate social responsibility.  It is also the first academic step towards achieving a Certificate in Socially Responsible Leadership. The course is designed to increase student evaluation of the role of business in society, understanding of ethical foundations, and application of a stakeholder model of analysis. It will introduces ethical analysis, decision making processes, as well as the role of ethics in corporate governance, and the need for an ethical corporate culture.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in their 2nd year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-111*†^ Introduction to Financial Accounting
As the initial course in accounting, this course provides a foundation of accounting knowledge necessary to the fuller appreciation of many aspects of business. The structure of the process of accounting is studied, with particular emphasis on the use, interpretation, and communication of financial information.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-211* Introduction to Financial Accounting
As the initial course in accounting, this course provides a foundation of accounting knowledge necessary to the fuller appreciation of many aspects of business. The structure of the process of accounting is studied, with particular emphasis on the use, interpretation, and communication of financial information.
This course not available to students enrolled in the  Commerce Program.
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COMM-112*†^ Introduction to Management Accounting
An examination of the internal accounting model and related information systems designed to keep the manager informed for the purposes of planning and controlling the organization’s operations.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.  
PREREQUISITE COMM-111*.
COREQUISITE ECON-110 or equivalent
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COMM-212* Introduction to Management Accounting
An examination of the internal accounting model and related information systems designed to keep the manager informed for the purposes of planning and controlling the organization’s operations.
PREREQUISITE COMM-211* and an introductory course in Economics.
This course not available to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
COREQUISITE ECON-110 or equivalent.
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COMM-121*†^ Introduction to Finance
This course provides students with a framework with which to analyze individual and corporate investment and financing decisions. We will introduce the notions of both time and risk to the valuation of individual securities, such as stocks and bonds, and to capital investments undertaken by corporations. Through this framework, we will gain an understanding of financial markets and the process by which companies make their investment decisions.
PREREQUISITE COMM-111*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in 2nd year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-221* Introduction to Finance
The focus is on financial decisions of the firm and the consumer. The two main tasks of financial management, investment choices and financing choices, are examined with emphasis on separation of the investment decision and the owners’ consumption decisions, on net present value in capital budgeting, and on capital structure. The course examines choices of portfolios by consumers and how these choices lead to equilibrium opportunity rates.
PREREQUISITE COMM-211*.
This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-122*† Financial Strategy
Financial Strategy expands the students’ knowledge of finance by building on the concepts of valuation and corporate financial management introduced in Finance I. This course looks in greater depth at (1) corporate hedging strategies with derivative instruments such as options, forwards, and futures; (2) corporate capital structure choice and valuation including capital budgeting with leverage and real options; (3) corporate financial policy including equity and debt financing and other hybrid type of securities such as warrants and convertibles; (4) corporate payout policy such as dividends and stock repurchase; and (5) corporate restructuring including merger, LBO, and bankruptcy. It aims to integrate financial theory into the real world applications. Students should have solid understanding of several key financial concepts such as no arbitrage, Black-Scholes model, M&M propositions, synergy etc. after taking this course.
PREREQUISITE COMM-121*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled 2nd year in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-131*† Introduction to Marketing
This course provides students with a knowledge of the concepts of marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of the firm. Specifically, the objectives are: to provide a working knowledge of the basic theories and concepts in marketing; to develop decision making skills and abilities and to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and plans. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analysis, and exams. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-231* Introduction to Marketing
This course provides students with a knowledge of the concepts of marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of the firm. Specifically, the objectives are: to provide a working knowledge of the basic theories and concepts in marketing; to develop decision making skills and abilities and to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and plans. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analysis, student presentations, and exams. This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-132*† Marketing II
This course provides an overview of the foundations of superior marketing related to the preparation, execution, and support of marketing programs. Through the use of regional, national and global marketing case studies, students will practice the evaluation, formation and deployment of business-level marketing tactics geared to boosting market share, customer loyalty, and profits. Students will be provided with analytical frameworks enabling them to identify and innovatively resolve issues. A key emphasis in the course is understanding the powerful impact that marketing recommendations have on costs, price, sales volumes, product or service quality, and brand equity.
PREREQUISITE COMM-131*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in their 2nd year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-151*† Organizational Behaviour
This course introduces students to the study of human behaviour in organizations. The purpose is to provide a coherent account of the causes and consequences of organizational behaviour. Lectures, discussions, cases, and exercises will be used to broaden the students’ understanding of working environments. Whenever possible, students’ own employment experiences will be drawn upon as a basis for understanding the concepts discussed.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-251* Organizational Behaviour
This course introduces students to the study of human behaviour in organizations. The purpose is to provide a coherent account of the causes and consequences of organizational behaviour. Lectures, discussions, cases and exercises will be used to broaden the students' understanding of working environments. Whenever possible, students' own employment experiences will be drawn upon as a basis for understanding the concepts discussed.
This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-161*† Introduction to Mathematical Analysis for Management
This course is designed to enhance student ability to apply advanced mathematical techniques including: linear algebra, differential and integral calculus, optimization, probability theory and computer modeling to tackle a wide range of managerial problems. It is assumed that students have taken Ontario Grade 12 calculus or its equivalent.
Restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-162*† Managerial Statistics
This course develops students’ capabilities for analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Course coverage will include probability, probability models, statistical inference, and a thorough grounding in simple and multiple regression. Topics will be illustrated with appropriate examples, many supported by spreadsheet methods. Restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
EXCLUSIONS ECON-250*, PSYC-202, STAT-162, STAT-163, STAT-263*, and PHED 351.
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COMM-163*† Business Decision Models I
This course deals with the application of deterministic mathematical models to management decision-making. Topics will include: the identification and formulation of decision models; the use of marginal analysis in basic problems of pricing and inventory control; the application of mathematical programming models in multivariate resource allocation; and the use of network models in transportation analysis, planning, and project management. Computer modeling and solution techniques will be discussed throughout the course, with emphasis on spreadsheet-based methods. A particular focus will be the interpretation and communication of model results. PREREQUISITE COMM-162*.
This course is restricted to 2nd year students in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-172*† Managerial Economics
This course covers the economic foundations of managerial decision-making.  Topics include supply and demand interactions, the theory of demand, decision-making under uncertainty, production and costs, price determination under perfect competition and monopoly, strategies for pricing with market power, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, game theory, asymmetric information, moral hazard, and incentive contracts. The course uses a variety of mathematical techniques, particularly algebra, and calculus.
PREREQUISITE ECON-110.
EXCLUSIONS ECON-212* and ECON-222*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-181*† Introduction to Human Resources Management
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to and understanding of the human resource management function in Canada in the early 21st century, focusing on the strategic importance of managing people in organizations.  This course focuses on the role of individuals in creating dynamic, successful organizations by developing an understanding of how the principles and practices of human resource management help firms to attract, retain, and develop its human capital, with due regard to the legal context and, where applicable, the labour relations realities.  The course is designed to illustrate the importance of human resource management for all managers in an organization, not just those who work in the functional area of human resources. In COMM 181, students consider their role as a manager in designing and facilitating contexts in which others can be successful, as well as understanding the contexts in which they will perform at their best. Throughout the course, students are asked to assume the role of a manager making strategic decisions with legal, economic, and organizational ramifications. PREREQUISITE ECON-110 is recommended.
This course is restricted to 2nd year students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-190*†^ The Development of Information Systems
The objective of this course is to help students understand critical business processes in organizations and how information systems can be used to improve these processes and generate economic value. Business cases and in-class exercises are used to teach students how to apply core information systems concepts in business and understand how to maximize the value information systems activities provide to the business. This course is restricted to students enrolled in 2nd year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-200* Introduction to Business
This course will develop an appreciation of the role of the manager and business in society. It will discuss Canadian and global trends and issues - political, economic, technological, and ethical - that affect business and management. The course will introduce the student to the nature of the modern corporate enterprise, large and small, and begin the building of business analysis skills.
This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
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COMM-226* Comparative Financial Institutions
This course provides an introductory comparative analysis of financial institutions and financial markets in major countries. The course will examine examples of international finance as practiced in the Euromarkets and examples of domestic practice in such countries as Great Britain, the United States, and Japan.
This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
This course is only offered at the International Study Centre.
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COMM-244* Project Management: An Engineering Economics Perspective
This is an introductory course in Project Management and Engineering Economics.  Through lectures, discussions of case studies, group assignments and reading from selected texts, students will address project management-related problems.  Factors underlying the success and failure of projects will be highlighted, paying particular attention to the management of requirements, budgets and time.  The students will have the chance to explore people issues by working in teams during group assignments.  Economic decision analysis is a key skill required by Project managers, and it represents the main focus of the course.  Examples in engineering economics will be used to introduce the students to the concepts of time value of money, discrete and multiple compounding, effects of inflation and methods for comparing alternative investments including replacement, make/buy and lease/buy decisions.
This course is restricted to students registered in the third- or fourth-year of the Faculty of Applied Science.
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COMM-270*† Business Communications in North America
This course, which emphasizes written and oral communication skills, is intended for international exchange students who need to improve their command of English.  Weekly lectures are complemented by small-group activities that focus on key points of style and grammar.  We also examine various formats of business communication: memorandums, e-mail, reports, proposals, and oral presentations.  Class discussion of readings is framed by cross-cultural theory, in order to encourage comparison and contrast of business practices on a global scale. Students eligible for this course must have either attended a university where the primary language of instruction was not English, or must have presented a TOEFL score for admission to Queen’s School of Business.
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COMM-300* Professional Internship
This 16 month professional internship coordinated by Queen’s Career Services provides students with the opportunity to apply their business knowledge and gain experience in the workforce. Students are required to attend a series of workshops and a pre-departure session designed to prepare them to maximize their learning during the internship and to orient them to the professional workplace. Commerce students normally choose this course after completing third year and are granted a Leave of Absence from the Commerce Program. On their return to Queen’s, students will be required to submit a brief report of their work experience.
This is a non-credit course.
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COMM-303* Business and Ethics
Business ethics is increasingly important as expectations of corporate social responsibility keep rising, as do negative consequences for failing those expectations.  Public, institutional, regulatory and government pressures mean decisions on business ethics can now determine corporate and career survival.  This advanced course on business ethics builds on the introductory Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility course in second year and is a credit toward the Certificate in Socially Responsible Leadership.  The course will go into depth in critical areas such as professional ethics, moral standards, stakeholder management, decision models and designing ethics programs to achieve an ethical workplace and corporate social responsibility objectives.  A number of critical issues will be explored in depth.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-305* Introduction to Entrepreneurship
The course introduces students to small business, what it means to be an entrepreneur, and the concepts of entrepreneurship.  Key assignments in the course include case discussions, first hand interaction with entrepreneurs, and an opportunity assessment (the pre-cursor to a business plan).  This course will complement COMM-405*
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COMM-307*† Canadian Business-Government Relations
This course is an analysis of public policies as represented by laws and regulatory governmental activities, and their effects on business decision-making, distribution of wealth, and allocative efficiency in the public and private sectors. The course will deal with such topics as: externalities and the assignment of property rights (natural resource conservation, pollution, congestion, issue of corporate social responsibility); theories of the regulatory process and the performance of regulatory agencies in specific markets; legislative process and lobbying strategies; competition policy; marketing boards; government assistance to failing firms; Canadian industrial strategy; public ownership; free trade, etc. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce program.
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COMM-308* Canadian Business History
The purpose of this course is to give the student of management the opportunity to study and analyze the history of the evolution of Canadian industries (and some of Canada’s leading corporations) as well as the emergence of the professional manager. The student should gain a deeper understanding of the roots of Canadian business, but more importantly, be able to understand and appreciate the complex internal and external forces which must be considered today when making critical business decisions. The course will be of interest to students who plan to follow a career in management as either a practitioner or a consultant and to those who will need to be able to do a comprehensive analysis and assessment of the financial and managerial performance of the modern firm.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the their program.
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COMM-309*† Real Estate Management
Real Estate is now the largest asset class in the world. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of real estate from the perspective of the manager, investor, or developer.  The concepts of development, valuation, finance and law as they pertain to real estate are introduced, providing the foundation for further study or career paths in the field.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-310* Environmental Accounting
There is no definitive definition of environmental accounting.  When the topic first became popular 20 years ago, environmental accounting referred to the measurement and communication of environment-related issues in the annual report and the calculation of environment-related costs and benefits in managerial decision making.  One of the central issues that has faced accountants is how to measure the true costs and benefits provided by the natural environment without which a business cannot thrive and be sustainable.  The course will begin by looking at how accountants have addressed this problem.  It will then follow this thread into some of the literature that discusses natural capitalism, the valuation of natural resources and on to environmental economics.  The course will also look at some of the responses by accounting bodies such as the CICA to climate change.  The topics will be presented using a variety of readings, classroom discussion, and guest speakers. A basic knowledge of accounting and economics would be helpful but there are no formal prerequisites.
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COMM-311*^ Financial Accounting Practices, Principles and Concepts
This is the first of two courses that constitute intermediate financial accounting. In these courses, generally accepted accounting principles and the basic assumptions underlying financial accounting decisions are examined in detail. Specific topics in this course include the Statement of Cash Flows, receivables, short- and long-term investments, and tangible and intangible capital assets. PREREQUISITE COMM-111* or COMM-211*.
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COMM-312*^ Intermediate Management Accounting
This second course in management accounting emphasizes the accounting concepts and analytical tools that are useful in planning and controlling organizational activity and in management decision-making. The principal costing systems and the related problems of cost estimation and cost allocations will be studied in greater depth than in the introductory course. A mixture of problem-solving exercises, discussion questions, cases, and readings may be employed.
PREREQUISITE COMM-112* and students must have a working knowledge of introductory statistics (particularly regression analysis).
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COMM-313*^ Financial Accounting II
This course is a continuation of COMM-311. Specifically, this course examines the theoretical underpinnings and accounting decision making related to such topics as long-term debt, pensions, leases, complex financial instruments and accounting for income taxes. IFRS and its implications play an important part of the discussion in every topic.
PREREQUISITE COMM-311*.
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COMM-314*†^ Management Control
Management control is the process of assuring that the resources of the organization are used effectively and efficiently in the accomplishment of its objectives. This course deals with the design and implementation of accounting and non-accounting related controls from a managerial perspective. Through the use of case analysis, the course focuses on the broad aspects of policy for management control. This course is appropriate for those who plan to become professional accountants, management consultants, and leaders of organizations. PREREQUISITE COMM-112*
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-315* Financial Statement Analysis and Accounting Based Valuation

This course focuses on the analysis of financial information, particularly the information contained in firms’ financial statements, for making investment decisions.  The primary focus is on determining the value of equity shares.  The course begins with a comparison of various valuation models used in practice, and develops a comprehensive valuation model based on accrual accounting numbers. This is followed by a detailed analysis of balance sheets and income statements, profitability and sustainable growth, accounting quality, and forecasting financial statement data.

PREREQUISITE COMM-111* (COMM-211*) and COMM-121* (COMM-221*). 
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd and 4th year of their program.
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COMM-317*†^ Auditing
This course examines the conceptual and analytical foundations of audit practice. It covers the role of the public accountant, the type of services provided, and the importance of good judgment.  The course takes students through the process of a financial statement audit. Specific topics include audit objectives, ethics and the code of conduct, audit planning and reporting, internal control, materiality and risk, statistical sampling, analytical review, and audit testing.
PREREQUISITE COMM-311*.
COREQUISITE COMM-401*
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-318*†^ Accounting Theory
This course examines the main issues in contemporary financial accounting theory and research, drawing on such areas as managerial economics, information theory, and agency theory. The emphasis is on active seminar participation and self-directed research, though approximately half of the class time is given to lectures. Some of the topics covered vary from year to year, depending on what are the most pressing current issues. They may include: theory of income and capital; markets for auditing services; effect of accounting information on capital markets; managers’ selection of accounting procedures; standard-setting; structure and governance of the accounting profession; ethics and accounting for environmental externalities; inflation accounting; international comparison of the bases for accounting principles; and selected topics such as deferred taxes or pension accounting. PREREQUISITE At least four courses in accounting.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-319*†^ Income Taxation
Taxes and business decisions interact with each other, affecting managers personally as well as the firms they work for. The main theme of the course is that managerial tax planning is part of the practice of management; it is part of the question of how to set up a business and chart its investment, financing and compensation strategies. The objective is to apply this perspective to domestic and international topics such as the choice of business entities, tax arbitrage, financial markets, compensation planning, business combinations, foreign investment and personal tax planning.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION This course is multidisciplinary in its focus, drawing on ideas in microeconomics, finance, financial accounting and management accounting. Prior courses in those areas at the 300-level are highly recommended but none is specifically required.
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COMM-321*† Derivative Securities
This course explores derivative instruments and their applications as risk management and yield enhancement tools. The focus is on standard derivatives (futures, forwards, FRA’s, swaps, options) as well as more complex products (exotic options and credit derivatives) and develops the key relationships required to price and hedge them (the cost-of-carry model, risk neutral valuations, binomial trees, Black & Scholes model, etc.). The course also explores best practices in the area of market and credit risk management and addresses topical issues pertaining to the use of derivatives by financial institutions and by non-financial corporations. This course is essential for students intending to pursue a career in sales and trading, investment banking, and corporate finance. PREREQUISITE COMM-121*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-322* Financial Management: Strategy
Financial strategies encompass those financial decisions that affect the long-run value of the firm, such as capital investment and its financing, capital structure, and dividend policy. The focus of the course is to provide a bridge to understanding the underlying principles behind why these decisions are made and to offer explanations for observed behaviours on the part of financial decision makers. A comprehensive framework of conceptual knowledge that builds on the principle of value maximization will be developed. The conceptual framework used by an entrepreneur in his/her simultaneous consumption and investment decision is shown to be the same as that use by large sophisticated corporations in their capital budgeting decisions using mean-variance portfolio theory and option pricing theory. The financing of corporate assets (i.e., capital structure decision) and payout policy (i. e., dividend decision) are an integral part of this conceptual framework. PREREQUISITE COMM-121* or COMM-221.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-323* Corporate Financial Planning
This course emphasizes the practical application of financial management principles using case studies. It is expected that students will learn how to identify and analyze key corporate financial planning/policy decisions by incorporating the insights provided by theory into their analysis of actual case histories. The application of the theoretical conclusions, and their modification to take account of features of the actual business environment or to explain observed behaviour, will be stressed throughout the course. The course will cover such topics as corporate goals, the roles of financial officers, the valuation of public and private corporations, financial analysis and pro forma financial statement forecasting, credit analysis, bank borrowing and other forms of short-term financing, optimal capital structure, raising new long-term capital (designing, pricing, placing, timing, and hedging new security issues), the cost of capital, capital budgeting decisions (including the analysis of mergers, acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, and divestitures).
PREREQUISITE COMM-121*or COMM-221*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-324* Investment and Portfolio Management
The course covers such topics as equity valuation, market efficiency, market anomalies, portfolio analysis and international diversification. Attention will also be focused on bond valuation, interest rate theories, and bond investment strategies. Derivative securities such as options and futures will be introduced. The course will also address the evaluation of the investment performance of individuals and investment management institutions. Applications of the various theories will be explored through course assignments and through class discussions of current events.
PREREQUISITE COMM-121* or COMM-221*.
EXCLUSION ECON-322*
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-325* Financial Modelling

This course covers different aspects of the theory of finance under uncertainty. Topics which may be discussed are utility maximization, state preference theory, capital and pricing, martingale pricing, and derivative securities. The emphasis in this course is on theory. Calculus and linear algebra will be used.

PREREQUISITE COMM-121* (COMM-221*). 
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-326* The Economics of Canada's Financial System
This course examines Canada’s financial system and the principal economic forces which shape both the system itself and the kinds of financial deals it can bring about. The course studies financial institutions and financial markets in Canada and in other major countries. It examines the decision processes of both the suppliers and the users of funds, using models of the financial intermediary process to examine several kinds of financing decisions. Internationally, Canada can only compete successfully for financial business if its performance standards measure up to those of other countries. Similarly on the domestic front, Canadians can sometimes learn to innovate with greater success by examining practices in other countries. Thus, the course studies many examples of international finance as practised in the Euromarkets, and of domestic practice in such countries as Great Britain, the United States, and Japan. The importance of economic and regulatory policy on financial markets and institutions is emphasized throughout. PREREQUISITE COMM-121* or COMM-221*.
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COMM-327*† Empirical Studies in Finance
This course covers a wide range of financial topics through the discussion of empirical academic papers and other sources. It provides a theoretical and empirical overview of major topics in both asset pricing and corporate finance. The objective is to prepare students to critically evaluate and conduct research in both areas.
PREREQUISITE Some previous courses in and a strong interest in finance. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-328* International Finance
This course focuses on the financial issues that managers confront in an international setting and develops a framework for evaluating the many opportunities, costs, and risks associated with multinational operations. The course employs cases extensively to provide students with a detailed and analytic look at investment and financial decisions undertaken by multinational firms. Topics covered include: determination of exchange rates; foreign exchange market; relationships among inflation rates, interest rates & exchange rates; currency futures, options & swaps; international investing; foreign exchange exposure; hedging exchange risk; and cross-border valuation. PREREQUISITE COMM-121* or COMM-221* or permission of the instructor.
Admission restricted to third- and fourth year students.
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COMM-329* Management of Financial Institutions
This course examines the goals, roles, and structure of financial intermediaries and the growth, financial, risk management, and marketing decision problems facing the managers of these institutions. For the most part, the course will take the viewpoint of the managers of the various kinds of financial institutions and concentrate on developing frameworks and solution procedures for the decision problems facing them. The use of derivative securities to hedge financial intermediary and corporate risk will be covered extensively in the second half of the course. The course will consist of a blend of lectures, readings, and case analysis, and it will emphasize the practical application of financial analysis tools and techniques. The descriptive material in the early part of the course, and all the case analysis, will focus on Canadian financial institutions and markets, such that students who expect never to work in Canada may find the course content less pertinent to their careers.  PREREQUISITE COMM-121* or COMM-221*
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-332* Marketing Research 
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the marketing research process, its uses, limitations and biases. Students should acquire problem-analysis skills and learn to translate a management problem into a marketing research question.  Students will learn about the advantages and limitations of various research methods, both qualitative (e.g. focus groups, observation, ethnography) and quantitative (e.g. surveys, experiments), and how to appropriately deploy them in a hands-on practice of marketing research. The ability to work well in teams and apply concepts learned in readings and in class to real-world research problems will substantially contribute to a student’s success in this class.
PREREQUISITE COMM-131 AND COMM-132* AND COMM-162* or permission of the instructor.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-333* Marketing Management and Marketing Strategy
This course provides students with the tools to plan and implement a competitively superior marketing strategy. Developing such strategies involves a comprehensive analysis of a firm’s customers, products, competitors, markets, resources and technology. Students will learn how to develop product/market objectives, to select markets in which the firm can operate with competitive advantage, and how to develop marketing mix tactics based upon the desired strategic vision objectives. This course examines issues such as evaluating opportunities in international markets, understanding consumer behavior in diverse markets, strategies for entering international markets, and growing global brands. Students are exposed to the decisions faced by global marketing managers with the aim of developing frameworks coordinating strategies in world markets.
PREREQUISITE COMM-131*or COMM-231* or COMM-132* or permission of the instructor.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-335*† Marketing Communications
This course provides an introduction to the topics of interest in the theory and practice of integrated marketing communications. Beginning with a basic understanding of the communication process, we address effective communication and creative strategy. We also examine strategies of integration across marketing communication elements, including traditional media advertising, internet and interactive advertising, direct, experiential, and word-of-mouth marketing, sales promotion, and public relations. Additional topics include efficiency in media planning, and the effects and effectiveness of advertising and communication. This course will introduce you to all topics necessary to design a complete integrated marketing communications campaign plan.
PREREQUISITE COMM-131*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce program.    
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COMM-336*† Consumer Behaviour
The broad goal of the course is to help students think critically about the assumptions implicit in many marketing decisions, enabling them to apply relevant theories of consumer behaviour to make better strategic marketing decisions. This course helps marketers understand who buys what, how, and why, providing a framework for thinking about how marketing decisions relate to theories of consumer behaviour. Through readings, cases, discussions, and hands-on marketing research, students will explore issues related to the various factors that influence consumers, their market-related knowledge, brand choices and relationships, social and self identities, lifestyle patterns, decision making, and behavioural processes. PREREQUISITE COMM-131*. Students who have completed COMM-231* can enroll with permission of the instructor.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-337*† Global Retail Management
This case, project, and readings course takes a “best practices” approach. We identify, study, and learn from the retailers who compete successfully in the global marketplace. These retailers will be compared in the way they manage consumer demand, the multi-national work force and supply chain assets. As the term progresses, the focus of the course will shift from a strategic and global perspective to the day-to-day management of the retail business. Topics include retail market strategy, market choice and entry mode, location, retail store patronage behaviour, financial / productivity analysis, sourcing, logistics and information systems, electronic retailing, merchandise management, and merchandise pricing. This course is for those who are interested in either starting their own retail business or managing existing small and large retail businesses. It is also relevant to those who would serve the retail sector, e.g., brand management, sales, manufacturers/suppliers, and financial analysts.
PREREQUISITE COMM-131*or COMM-231*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.   
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COMM-338*† Marketing Ethics 
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to examine multiple perspectives related to the ethical implications of marketing decisions and strategies. This advanced course builds on concepts learned in the 2nd year Business Ethics course and can be taken as a credit towards the Certificate in Socially Responsible Leadership. Using current topics in the media, case studies and research projects, students will explore, discuss and debate the ethical dilemmas that face marketing practitioners and society at large. The course has the three major objectives of encouraging students to 1) develop a broad-based perspective on marketing’s role in society; 2) develop an informed perspective on ethical issues within marketing; and 3) to learn how to incorporate ethics and social responsibility as a part of decision-making practice and processes. Topics to be discussed include social marketing and entrepreneurship; ethics in advertising (e.g. deception/puffery & advertising to vulnerable populations); ethical issues related to production, distribution and pricing; and volunteerism, philanthropy and non-profit marketing. This course is designed for individuals with a focus on marketing, but is open to others with an interest in the issues of ethics and corporate social responsibility.
PREREQUISITE COMM-104*, COMM-131* (or COMM-231*) and COMM-132* or permission of the instructor.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd and 4th year of their program.   
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COMM-339*† Channels and Internet Marketing
Marketing using the Internet channel, has forever changed how businesses, public sector agencies, and not-for-profit organizations can interact with their various stakeholders and channel players. This course exposes students to materials and issues including Internet retailing, B2C marketing tactics, Internet consumer behavior, site design and management, integrating Internet channel tactics into the overall strategic marketing plan, international Internet marketing issues, and Internet promotion and advertising. PREREQUISITE COMM-132*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.  
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COMM-341* Operations Management
In order to deliver products and services to customers, an organization must organize its operations in an effective and efficient manner. This course develops skills in operations management by integrating material across functional areas, introducing new managerial concepts and applying rigorous problem solving techniques. Topics such as process improvement, quality management, supply chain management, and project management are considered for manufacturing and service firms.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.  
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COMM-342*† Operations Strategy and Innovation Management
This course examines the use of operations and innovations as competitive weapons.  The emphasis is on the successful development of products, manufacturing process, and supply chains.  The use of computer technologies for product and process management will also be stressed.  The course proceeds from broad discussions of operations strategy to assessment of specific strategies (competing on quality, productivity, and new products and processes) to discussions of how those strategies can best be implemented over time.  A key objective of the course is the development of operations and innovation strategies which are integrated with the overall business strategy of an organization as well as the other functional strategies such as marketing, technology and human resources. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-343*† Service Management
Over 75% of employment in North America is now involved in service industries such as hospitality, finance, health, legal, entertainment, retail and consulting.  Despite that concentration of resources, many of us are still dissatisfied customers.  This course looks at service industries from two perspectives – First, as a General Manager or Entrepreneur in that business, and examines the specific operational factors associated with developing and running a service organization; and Second, as a consultant advising leadership in the client company in solving problems or making improvements.  Both perspectives align in our pursuit of understanding what it takes to create a truly breakthrough service company.  Specific core topics include service strategy and design, lean, risk and crisis management, innovation and execution.  We apply a service management framework in understanding the link between organizational culture, strategy, our employees and customer satisfaction in a team project involving a ‘Dragon’s Den’ pitch to a group of peer investors.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-346*† Management of Technology and Innovation
Managing change and innovation are two of the most important and difficult tasks managers have to undertake. Technology and innovation are pervasive forces throughout society and organizations. They are both critical to establishing a sustainable competitive edge through either cost differentiation or a superior cost position. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that form the basis for successful project management and a strategic perspective on the role of technology and innovation in organizations. Students are also exposed to practical management tools that they can use to manage specific innovations and technological changes. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-350*† The Future: Forecasting and the Business Environment
Most organizations make or buy explicit predictions of the environment within which they expect to be operating. They serve as a basis for planning and control. These organizations are trying to identify, understand and influence changes that are occurring in the local, national and international economic, political and social environments, as well as in their own organization. The course examines the theoretical and historical origins of forecasting, and discusses the approaches used to make and assess predictions in the short- to medium-term. The emphasis is on the practical application of forecasting methods.
This course is restricted to students in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-351* Leadership
This seminar style course examines the practice and impact of leadership in organizations and communicates as we enter into the 21st century.  The evolvement of leadership from the command and control style to the more recent transformation authentic, will be examined in a variety of settings as described in both popular and academic writings on leadership.  The impact of leadership will be assessed by research on whether and how individuals make a difference.  The course also examines emerging trends in leadership in the 21st century.  Texts and readings, exercises and team projects will be utilized. PREREQUISITE COMM-151* or COMM 251* .
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COMM-352* Organizational Analysis
This advanced course in organizational behaviour goes beyond COMM-151* by exploring current research in and applications of social science to organizational and inter-organizational behavior. The objectives of this course are 1) to develop an understanding of the complexity and dynamics of organizational life using analysis and the discussion of key issues facing employees in today's organizations, and 2) to provide students with opportunities to apply theory and research to improve their understanding of management practice through the use of case discussions and analysis. Emphasis will be placed upon students' development of critical thinking skills and an appreciation of the frontiers of current knowledge in the selected areas.
PREREQUISITE  COMM-151* or COMM-251* or permission of instructor for students of upper-year standing in social sciences.
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COMM-353* Managing Across Cultures
This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to manage effectively in other cultural environments and to work effectively with people from other cultures. The course concentrates on both the theories and practices of cross-cultural management that will help students understand, and be understood by, people from foreign cultures. Students will develop insight on the pervasive and hidden influence of culture on behaviour; the types of situations and issues managers confront when working internationally; and the challenges of living and working in a foreign country. Topics covered include communicating and negotiating across cultures; motivating, leading, and training employees in different cultures; and expatriate manager adjustment skills. While a wide variety of cultures are examined in this course, students also have the opportunity to select and conduct an in-depth study of a culture that interests them most. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.     
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COMM-355* Group Processes in Organizations
The purpose of this course is to assist women and men to develop an understanding of the role of gender in their future as managers and colleagues in the business environment and in their personal lives through a highly interactive classroom setting. It will examine current organizational demographics, current research, and best organizational practices with respect to the management of gender related issues, leadership, and communication similarities and differences between women and men, mentoring, work and family issues, and sexuality in the workplace. The history and societal norms and expectations about gender will also be examined to broaden understanding of the context of the managerial role. PREREQUISITE  COMM-151* or COMM-251*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.    
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COMM-356* Gender Issues in Management
The purpose of this course is to assist women and men to develop an understanding of the role of gender in their future as managers and colleagues in the business environment and in their personal lives through a highly interactive classroom setting. It will examine current organizational demographics, current research, and best organizational practices with respect to the management of gender related issues, leadership, and communication similarities and differences between women and men, mentoring, work and family issues, and sexuality in the workplace. The history and societal norms and expectations about gender will also be examined to broaden understanding of the context of the managerial role. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their Program.
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COMM-357* Interpersonal Skills for Managers
This course is the practical application of organizational behaviour and human resource management knowledge to the effective and productive management of people and relationships at work.  It provides a practical supplement to COMM-151* and COMM-181*. The objective of this course is to further develop interpersonal skills crucial to any manager's role, including self-awareness, stress and time management, creativity and problem-solving, and conflict management. This course is highly experiential in nature.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-358*† Human Resource Management
This advanced seminar examines a set of the key HR challenges facing managers today and helps students to understand the latest models, concepts and tools to help manage these challenges. Topics include recruitment and selection, retention, orientation, performance management, coaching, succession planning, discipline, and compensation. The legal environment governing human resource management will also be covered with an emphasis on human rights. Learning is facilitated using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analysis, student presentations, and exams. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.  
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COMM-359* Power and Organizational Politics
A key task for today’s managers is the ability to pull together the very best skills and resources to get things done in organizations. Power dynamics are a fundamental part of managerial work and both organizational and individual effectiveness rests on understanding those dynamics and using them effectively. This course provides a framework for analyzing the sources of power in organizations, and the circumstances that lead to its attainment and effective use. We draw upon case studies and students own experiences as well as research from the fields of management, political science, psychology, and sociology to further our understanding of power and political processes in organizational settings. Topics covered include the nature and sources of power, conflict management, interpersonal influence and persuasion, ethics, network structures and social capital.
PREREQUISITE  COMM-151* or COMM-251*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.  
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COMM-361*† Business Decision Models II
This course builds on the foundations of data analysis and deterministic decision modeling set in COMM-162* and COMM-163*. The emphasis in this course is managerial decision making under uncertainty. Topics include stochastic inventory control, waiting-line models, computer simulation modeling, risk and decision analysis, and forecasting models. Computer spreadsheets will be used extensively, and a particular focus will be the interpretation and communication of model results from the viewpoint of decision makers.
PREREQUISITE COMM-161*, COMM-162* and COMM-163*. 
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.    
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COMM-365*† Advance Business Decision Modeling
This course builds on the foundations of data analysis and decision modeling set in Comm 162* and Comm 163*.  The emphasis in this course is advanced managerial decision making under uncertainty.  Topics include stochastic inventory control, waiting-line models, computer simulation modeling, risk and decision analysis, forecasting models, revenue management, and dynamic pricing.  Computer spreadsheets will be used extensively, and a particular focus will be the interpretation and communication of model results from the viewpoint of decision makers.
PREREQUISITE  COMM-162* and COMM-163*. 
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.      
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COMM-372*† Business and Development

Doing business in developing countries is one of the hottest topics on today’s business agenda.  Whether it is the opportunities of selling to vast and growing markets—the so called “fortune at the bottom of the pyramid”—or the prospects of dramatically lower costs through outsourcing, business leaders are interested in developing country markets as never before.  This broad-ranging course aims to apply the tools of economics and international business to understand the opportunities and pitfalls of doing business in developing-country environments.   The course will focus on a range of practical business-focused questions, but it will also bring students to the frontier of debates in development economics and business ethics.  Topics include:  Assessing opportunities and challenges in emerging markets; building capabilities for doing business in weak institutional environments; debates among leading schools of thought on development; and the roles and responsibilities of profit-seeking businesses.        
The course should be of interest to students interested in development economics, international business and business ethics. 

PREREQUISITE COMM-172* or equivalent.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.    
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COMM-373*† International Business Negotiations
This course requires the application of cumulative knowledge of functional areas and international business to negotiation situations. It will introduce: current thinking and research on negotiating; exploring the different aspects of international negotiations, including planning, the effect of culture on negotiating styles, and managing the process. It will concentrate on developing international negotiating awareness and skills through the use of international negotiation exercises, simulations and cases. The focus will be on both the personal level (honing your own negotiating skills and awareness) and the corporate level (analyzing the factors that are important to companies in international negotiations, planning and implementing complex negotiations).
PREREQUISITE This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-374*† International Business Strategy

International Business Strategy explores the key strategic questions firms face when entering international markets, and competing in the global economy. We focus on how globalization affects the strategic management of companies, and what you as managers need to do to compete successfully in the international environment. This course uses practical business cases on firms from around the world to simulate discussion and illustrate fundamental international strategy concepts.

This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-375* International Business
This course introduces students to the relevant non-market actors that affect the international business environment and provides a broad range of theoretical frameworks for understanding and shaping their motivations, capabilities and strategies. Topics will include the international trading environment, political and country risk analysis, the motivations of national governments, international and national regulators, and the interaction of firms with government, industry and lobby groups. In covering a wide range of topics, this course favors breadth over depth. The course primarily draws on readings from lecture notes, lectures, class room discussion and debate. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-376*†  Business in the Asia-Pacific Rim
The Asia-Pacific Region has emerged as an enormous economic force comparable in significance to the United States and Europe, a growing mass of middle-class Asian consumers have been added to the world economy, and a dynamic breed of Asian companies have joined the league of multinationals. However, multinationals entering the Asia-Pacific Rim countries must realize that the competitive environments, socio-political institutions, cultural norms and business practices in the Asia-Pacific region are markedly different from those in Western industrialized countries. The main objectives of this course are to identify such differences and to analyze the impact of these differences on the strategies of multinational companies. Topics include: historical contexts, the role of the state, government-business relationships, inter-business networks, institutional and economic reforms, market competitions, consumer tastes, and business etiquettes.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.    
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COMM-381*^ Business Law I

Since legal considerations enter into nearly all business transactions and influence most important managerial decisions, owners and managers of business firms make their economic choices and take actions within the general framework of law and jurisprudence. While government and business exert a powerful influence on each other, the judge–made common law of contract is the basic law governing not only business activities but dealings between persons in society. This course will explore the Canadian legal infrastructure and context, and the laws of tort and contract – the two most important private law doctrines.  Students will not only learn a cursory understanding of the law, but also a framework for solving legal problems as business people or professionals.  This course is one of the Canadian Institute for Chartered Accountants Education Requirements.

This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-382* Business Law II
This course expands upon the material from Business Law I (an introduction to common law, specifically the law of tort and contracts).  Commerce 382 is concerned primarily with the law and regulation relating to specific business activities (sales, marketing, leasing and bailment) and business relationships (business organizations, agency and credit relationships).  Other topics which may be addressed include intellectual property, ownership of real property, insurance and employment law.
PREREQUISITE COMM-381*. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
PREREQUISITE COMM-381*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.  
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COMM-384* The Collective Agreement and its Administration
This course examines the content and administration of a collective agreement, including the settlement of disputes that arise while a collective agreement is in effect. The course will emphasize the arbitration process, and will utilize cases and role-playing to illustrate typical arbitration problems. As a part of the course, student teams will present legal argument before a professional arbitrator in a mock arbitration.
PREREQUISITE COMM-180* or COMM-181*.    
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COMM-385*† Negotiation Theory and Behaviour
Negotiation is part of everyday life in organizations, whether negotiating with customers, clients, suppliers, co-workers or even the boss.  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to theory and research on negotiations with an emphasis on the social, behavioural, and decision-making processes.  Negotiations will be studied in a variety of settings ranging from simple buyer-seller negotiations to multi-party, multi-issue, cross-cultural negotiations.  In addition to the fundamentals of integrative and distributive bargaining, special topics may include ethics, gender, power, emotions, technology, and the use of agents.  The course also includes a practical component in that students participate in simulations, exercises, and case analysis designed to develop their negotiating skills as well as their understanding of negotiation processes. This course is restricted to students in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-386*† Conciliation and Dispute Resolution
This course examines dispute resolution in international commerce, focusing on questions of institutional design, domestic and international law, and the political economy of global business. In preparation for discussing the specifics of dispute resolution under NAFTA and the WTO, the course begins with various theories of negotiation, from game theory to social psychology.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-387* The Behavioural Study of Unions
Unions are fascinating organizations and contrary to what the prophets of doom would have us believe, they will not vanish in the near future.  The aim of this course is to examine why people vote for and join unions, why they become committed to unions, why they choose to participate in unions, and sometimes choose to de-certify unions.  The roles of national and local leaders will be examined, as will the effects of unions on organizational functioning (e.g., productivity and performance, job security, absenteeism, turnover, and job satisfaction).  The extent to which unions meet the needs of women, part-timers, and contingent workers will be considered. The impact of the changing economic and social environments on the policies and strategies of the unions including the labour movement’s response to globalization.
PREREQUISITES COMM-151* and COMM-181*.
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COMM-388* Designing for Effective Human- Computer Interaction in Business
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has been defined as “a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them”. In this course, we survey the various components and techniques of HCI. Starting with some basic capabilities of people, we: look at the design of everyday objects to motivate the design of computer interfaces; explore various techniques for bringing users into the design loop as we learn about basic user interface design tools; and study evaluation techniques to help understand if our designs are effective. We examine the implications of HCI for a variety of business applications (e.g.: electronic commerce, computer-supported cooperative work, and employee training).
PREREQUISITE  This course is restricted to students who have taken COMM-190* or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-389*† Topics in Industrial Relations
This course provides the student with an opportunity to do independent research on some problem area in the labour and employee relations field. Topics vary to suit particular student interests but are centered in the following areas: the management of technological change and job displacement; the economic and behavioural implications of the shorter work week and of worker participation in management; job attitudes, job satisfaction, labour turnover, and productivity; various aspects of public and wage-price policy, labour law, and arbitration.
PREREQUISITE COMM-180* or COMM-181* and COMM-384*.
This course is restricted to students in 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-391* Organizational Systems Governance and Design
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of systems governance in organizations as well as common concepts and practices used in systems management, development and operations (e.g., ITIL, COBIT). Due to the increasing complexity and importance of human and technological systems to the strategic and operational activities of businesses, it is critical that analysts, auditors, consultants, and general managers have a thorough understanding of how to attain value, minimize risk, and fulfil compliance requirements related to their organizational systems. By investigating the managerial aspects of how both human and technological resources are planned, implemented, supported, and monitored (e.g. disaster recovery, security, IT audit), this course will equip students with the knowledge and skills to evaluate risks and formulate plans to address systems governance challenges. PREREQUISITE  COMM-190*or COMM-200 or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-394* Business Telecommunications
Telecommunications is an important part of the IS environment in many organizations. Not only is it an input mechanism for capturing data about the basic operations of the business as soon as they occur but it provides the means for linking and disseminating vital information within the organization and between organizations. In many industries the dependence on telecommunications and computer systems has become critical. The course will examine various telecommunications technologies, including the internet, their application in industry, and approaches to managing telecommunications resources. In addition, the course will examine approaches to electronic commerce and commercial development of the World Wide Web. Course work will include both design projects and in-depth industry analysis.
PREREQUISITE COMM-190* or permission of the instructor.  
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COMM-395* IS Strategy - Maximizing the Business Value

This course introduces students to common strategic concepts and frameworks used by organizations and consultants to select and implement appropriate technology-enabled systems and exploit business value from technology investments. Through the use of case studies, class discussions will examine the strategy and management approaches of the information systems function inside organizations. The course also examines the popularization of computing and the rapid expansion of the software industry that has lead to great hype and confusion. The evolution of information systems is an interesting story – this course maps the evolution of technology to the industrial, informational, and attention eras by studying how companies such as Cisco, Google, Amazon, and Oracle have pioneered innovation in their respective industries and where they plan on going in the future. This is the capstone course for those students specializing in MIS.

PREREQUISITE COMM-190* OR (COMM-200 and CISC-124) or permission of the instructor.   
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COMM-397* IS Special Topics - Knowledge Management Systems
This course examines the design, development, and use of Knowledge Management Systems in organizations. Building on the expertise and facilities at Queen’s University, such as the Queen’s Executive Decision Centre and the Centre for the Management of Knowledge Based Enterprises, this course looks at particular knowledge management systems and groupware (such as Lotus Notes), intranets, electronic meeting systems, and team-based executive support systems. These systems are now at the forefront of information technologies as modern businesses evolve into flexible, knowledge-based organizations. Students will study how these systems are developed. Students will examine the various roles that hardware, software, and people play in the effective use of these systems. Students will design and build a small knowledge-based system using a software package such as Lotus Notes or GroupSystems V.
PREREQUISITE COMM-190* or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-398*† Business, Government and the Global Economy

In an era of globalization and crises, international business is argued to be characterized by “total competition”.   Managers are certainly expected and are required to be fluent in “market strategies” such as competing on cost, differentiation, etc. However, managers must also be fluent in understanding, anticipation and shaping the workings of the “visible hands” of governments and international institutions. This is particularly important because the global economic system has undergone tremendous stress over the past three years. This course explores how the global economy works via the in-depth examination of the various “systems” that govern it – the systems of energy, finance, trade, and government-business relations.  The course develops frameworks, tools, and concepts from various disciplines – business strategy, economics, political science, philosophy – that will help new managers meet the non-market challenges they will inevitably face.  It is heavily case and discussion based and looks at the practical application of the concepts discussed.  Commerce 375 would be an ideal, though not absolutely necessary, prerequisite.

This course is restricted to students in 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-401*† Business and Corporate Strategy
This course focuses on the functions and responsibilities of top executives in managing the entire enterprise rather than any specific functional area (marketing, finance, accounting etc.). Students will be introduced to the literature in the field of strategic management and will learn various theoretical models and frameworks for effective formulation and implementation of corporate and business level strategies. The major purpose of this course is to enable students to identify various internal and external sources of competitive advantage and to develop strategy that builds on those advantages to create superior value for customers. Students will have an opportunity to apply various analytical tools and techniques to business simulations and case studies drawn from firms competing in a wide range of industries.  
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-402*† Advanced Topics in Strategy
This course builds upon COMM 401 by extending, addressing in greater depth, themes and topics current in strategy theory and practice. The specific focus of the course my change from year to year depending upon both the interest and expertise of the faculty member and the needs of students. The themes of the course in previous years have ranged broadly, for example, consulting, corporate governance and social enterprise. PREREQUISITE  COMM 401 (Business and Corporate Strategy)
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COMM-403*† Business Ethics: Understanding Religion for Doing Business
The opening decade of the twenty-first century has demonstrated that religion continues to be a strong cultural influence that impacts business in a globalized economy. In this course students will develop the background knowledge and analytic skills necessary to identify and negotiate religious commitments in business relationships. We will analyze select case studies to explore various ways in which business practitioners can and do address the questions that arise in everyday interactions in business contexts. Students will be asked to deal with the cases as they would do so in a real business setting, and to defend their decisions using ethical principles and religious reasoning learned in class.
This course is restricted to third and fourth year Commerce students.
RELS students may enroll in the course with permission of the instructor.    
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COMM-405*† New Business Development
The focus of this course is to provide students with knowledge, skills, and tools that form the basis required to identify, analyze, plan, and execute a new venture activity. It also provides a depth of understanding of the practical realities of new ventures and growing a small business. This course requires a high degree of self-study as the major project involves the detailed analysis, planning and presentation of a business plan for a new venture proposal. Students are expected and encouraged to use this course to assess and plan actual new venture opportunities that they may seriously consider. Guest speakers, cases and concepts will be utilized to allow the student to better understand the exciting and challenging realities of entrepreneurship and managing new ventures.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program or by permission of the instructor.
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COMM-407* Critical Perspectives on Business
“Maximized output (is) a sign of poor management” - Walter Jolly, Cree hunter, Nemaska, Quebec 1997. Much business education assumes that the market model produces positive outcomes, reflected in an ever expanding range of goods and services available to all. This course questions conventional business assumptions about self-regulating markets and the corporations that dominate them. It challenges students to rethink basic assumptions, asking (with a nod to a from General Motors CEO) “if it’s good for business, is really good for society?” We’ll use Karl Polanyi’s model of the double movement to examine the tensions between free markets and society as a whole. The provocative course incorporates environments and class-based critiques, examining, Bhopal, Westray, liberalism, globalization, drive-thrus, Wal-Mart, and the Cree hunters of northern Quebec. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-408* Sustainability Strategies and Practices
This course, open to third and fourth-year students from all Faculties and Schools at Queen’s, focuses on the functions and responsibilities of managers at all levels to develop effective sustainability practices. Students will be part of an interdisciplinary team that will choose projects to present to the class on (a) innovative approaches to sustainability problems and (b) applying sustainability practices to an organization of their choice. Guest lecturers will present their hands-on experiences, and there are tours of sustainability applications in the community. Emphasis will be placed on transferable skills in assessing, promoting, and achieving sustainable practices for organizations of all sizes that will be useful regardless of Faculty, School, or discipline.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of their program.
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COMM-409* Sustainability Measurement, Implementation and Evaluation
Sustainability is now embedded in the business planning cycle of every forward-looking business. Sustainability Measurement, Implementation, and Evaluation (SMIE) aims to equip students with the ability to identify and manage these sustainability initiatives in both private sector and public sector organizations. It will be relevant and useful for any students, regardless of discipline, to keep abreast of the latest developments in sustainability. The focus of the course will be on assessing and measuring environmental impacts using various spreadsheets, templates, and quantitative and qualitative analyses, then applying appropriate technology and behaviour changes to increase sustainable practices. Specific cases, situations, and scenarios will be introduced to help provide students with the evaluation of practical methodologies they can use at work and in their communities to increase the world’s level of environmental sustainability. This course is restricted to students in the 3rd or 4th years of their program.
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COMM-410*† Strategies of Social Enterprise
Strategies for Social Enterprise is different from other business courses that emphasize specific aspects of management such as finance, marketing, accounting, information systems, or operations. Rather than focusing on a particular functional area, this course is designed to expose students to business strategies that have emerged to address important societal and environmental issues. The intent is to deepen their understanding of some of the ways in which issues such as poverty, climate change, health, habitat destruction, gender inequality, and pollution are being addressed by various types of organizations. We analyze several social enterprise business models that have evolved including market-driven firms that offer socially-conscious products, organizations that invest in less developed countries, businesses that focus on more than simply earning a profit, and institutions that are devoted to charitable work.
This course is an approved course for students pursuing a Certificate in Socially Responsible Leadership.
This course is restricted to students in the 3rd and 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-415*† Corporate Governance and Control
In today’s environment, boards are facing increasing pressure to be more accountable to their stakeholders - to be more open and transparent. Boards are being asked to address a bewildering range of problems and demands from corporate social responsibility to avoiding credit crushes to maintaining good jobs to increasing corporate value. These issues, which if left unresolved can put individual board members and their organizations at risk. This course is about the roles and value of various approaches to corporate governance and the control frameworks through which directors can influence how corporations act. The course will investigate the role of governance in both for profit and not for profit organizations. This course provides an added practical benefit, a great background for roles that you soon will be called upon to undertake as graduating Queen’s Commerce students, being board members of not for profit organizations.
Evaluation: Grading will be based on class participation, one page memo writing exercises and an individual or group term project. There will be no tests or exams in the course.
PREREQUISITE Enrollment is restricted to third and fourth year Commerce students who have completed COMM-111* and COMM-112*.
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COMM-416* Organizational Fraud
This course examines fraud within organizations. Students will learn the types of fraud typically committed as well as how to identify conditions within an organizational setting that likely increases the chances of fraud. Significant time is spent discussing ways in which to prevent and detect fraud. Finally, this course includes ethical decision making within the accounting and financial reporting function. The course will be taught using an interactive, case-based methodology. Current events may play an important role in this course. This course qualifies for CSRL credit. PREREQUISITE COMM-111* or COMM-211*
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COMM-431* Marketing and Business Strategy
As a functional area, marketing must operate as an agent of business strategy. In its role as liaison or conduit to the customer, marketing makes promises which the rest of the organization has to keep. Promise too little and we fail to make a sale; promise too much and the result is a loss of customer loyalty and soft prices. But if marketing is to be an agent of strategy then it must recognize that businesses following different strategies require different kinds of marketing efforts and different supporting marketing infrastructures and approaches. Similarly, just as businesses change their strategies at different stages of their life cycle and in response to market and competitive dynamics, so too must marketing make the appropriate accommodations to maintain its compatibility with the business’ overall direction. This course provides a review of the major business strategies available to a firm, the identification of how marketing varies across businesses following different strategies, and how both business and marketing strategies must be adjusted over time in response to customer and competitive dynamics. Readings and a small number of case studies will be used. The final project is a real time exercise, dealing with a strategic problem facing a business presented to the senior management team of the enterprise.
PREREQUISITE Enrollment is restricted to third and fourth year Commerce students who have completed COMM-131* and COMM-132*.
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COMM-434*† Sales Management
Selling is the engine that drives commerce. This highly-interactive and engaging course provides students with an understanding of the key aspects of professional sales and the role of corporate sales management related to planning, organizing, staffing, directing and evaluating the selling function. Students will learn about the importance of preparing a formal sales call, dealing with objections, and closing a sale for a product or service. A wide variety of sales experts will visit the class to discuss their profession and will provide a valuable network for anyone considering a sales career.
PREREQUISITE COMM-132*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-437*† Marketing of Services
The service sector represents over 75% of employment and GDP in North America. The marketing of services is different from the marketing of products. In this course, students develop an understanding of the unique challenges of marketing services. To accomplish these objectives, the course will be taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analyses, assignments, and an exam.
PREREQUISITE COMM-132*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-439*† Business-to-Business Marketing
The focus of this course is to help the student understand the field of business-to-business marketing: what it is, how it functions and how to perform in this field.  This is a much different world than retail.  Business to business marketing is about growing sales and making money in a hyper-competitive global marketplace that mainly functions behind the scenes of the end-product’s consumption.  It requires the use of:  customer relationships, supplier relationships, marketing strategy, value analysis, product/process technology and a comprehensive knowledge of the supply chain, your industrial sector, the target customer’s industry and the end use item’s consumer market.   This is an applications based course utilizing case studies.  The goal is to put already learned analytical skills to use in an environment that focuses on one business supplying another.  Every product you buy has gone through several links of the B2B supply chain, building value till it is ready to be sold.  We will concentrate on the functioning business environment where products are formed before going to the final consumer.
PREREQUISITE COMM-132*
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 3rd or 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-451*† Organizations and Organizational Environments
Individuals, neighborhoods, organizations and nations live within environments.  Each is shaped by, and responds to (and tries to shape) their environments. It does not take much ingenuity to be happy, vibrant, profitable, and open in environments that provide lots of resources, are stable and are nurturing.  Thriving is much tougher when environments turn thin, unstable, dangerous and hostile: dissatisfaction grows, violence increases, legitimacy is lost, and citizens and employees leave.  All actors -- whether individuals or collectivities -- go through declines. The questions asked in this course are how do -- and how should -- actors respond to declines.
PREREQUISITE  COMM-151*.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
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COMM-471*† Advanced Topics in International Business and Corporate Social Responsibility
The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical foundation and practical implementation aspects of corporate social responsibility (CSR). It is a senior seminar for third and fourth year students. Drawing on an interdisciplinary foundation of readings from business strategy, law, political science, and economics, students will be exposed to historical and contemporary thinking about the role of the corporation in society. In addition to this foundational material, students will investigate current and ongoing examples of corporate social responsibility activity from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and will be expected to produce written and verbal reports on these cases, detailing the issues at stake and the reasoning behind their resolution.
PREREQUISITE  COMM-374* or COMM-375*.
This course is restricted to 3rd and 4th year students in the Commerce Program or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-492* Managing Data for Business Intelligence
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of database management in organizations and the effective use of organizational data to gain competitive intelligence. It presents the basic concepts and definitions that are required to understand the role of data and information in the modern organization. Various data models are presented, paying particular attention to the relational model. Emphasis is placed on the application and development of those models through the development of a small database system. Concepts in business intelligence will be reinforced via practical work with online data warehouses and analytical tools. Management issues such as data reliability and security, as well as implementation challenge of business intelligence solutions, will also be covered. PREREQUISITE COMM-190* OR (COMM-200* and CISC-124) or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-495* Project Management
Effective project management is both a skill set and a leadership function that requires discipline in planning, organizing, and managing resources to execute projects to meet strategic goals and objectives.  As such, this course will cover concepts in the four basic functions of management (planning, organizing, directing, and controlling) as applied to a project context.  As not all projects are the same, students will also learn how to tailor specific tools and technique in each phase of the standard life cycle (Project Initiation, Project Planning, Project Execution, Project Monitoring and Control, and Project Closing) to adapt project management to different organizational and societal environments.  Through the Project Management Institute (PMI), students can become a Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) after completing COMM-495* and passing an exam administered through PMI.
PREREQUISITE COMM-190* and COMM-341* or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-496* IS Security, Privacy and Ethics
This course examines corporate social responsibility in the information age.   Today’s managers are responsible not only for the completeness and usefulness of corporate databases but also for securing the personally identifiable information that is stored in their systems and used for decision-making.  Companies are responsible to their customers, employees, business partners and governments for ensuring the effective collection, storage, distribution and destruction of this information as well as for its accuracy and appropriate use.  Laws such as Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) and the U.S, Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) guide corporate actions but managers still must decide how to implement these statutes.  This course covers technical issues (e.g., data security controls), behavioural factors e.g., employee and customer actions that expose stakeholders to data losses), legal requirements (such as PIPEDA and SOX) and managerial responsibilities.  Cases and guest speakers are utilized to illustrate and underscore the importance of the issues studied.
PREREQUISITE COMM-190* or the permission of the instructor.
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COMM-501*† Directed Independent Studies in Business
This course is provided for those students who have an interest in deepening their knowledge through independent study in a particular specialized area not available in the regular course offerings. This advanced study will be conducted under the supervision of, and in active consultation with, an appropriate faculty member of the School. Periodic reporting, written assignments, and oral examinations normally will be part of the learning experience. Students wishing to enrol in this elective should have high academic standing in at least three courses in the general area of this specialization, and must submit their study proposal in writing to the Commerce Program Executive Director. Students may apply for this option only once, and only after completing either the third year or 96.0 units.
PREREQUISITE Permission of the Commerce Program Executive Director.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.   
EXCLUSIONS COMM-502†, COMM-503
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COMM-502† Business Problems and Projects
Students selecting this course may elect to do a project on either an individual or small-group basis. The individual project is a course in the methods of business research and students work on a problem or project under the supervision of a faculty member of the School. Students must submit their study proposal in writing to the Program Executive Director. In the case of team projects, the students form into groups usually of not more than 6 persons and analyze the activities of a cooperating business firm. The group is expected to present a report of their findings and recommendations to the management of the subject firm. This course may extend through the full academic year (but may be done in less), but in all cases the work will be equivalent to the weight of 6.0 credit for each student whether undertaken as an individual or a group project.
PREREQUISITE Permission of the Commerce Program Executive Director.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
Course weight: 6.0 units.    
EXCLUSIONS COMM-501*†, COMM-503
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COMM-503† Business Research
This course is designed to help the student develop a capacity to handle an original investigation and to communicate the results of his or her investigation in a formal written report. Each student will select a research project to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member of the School. This course is carried over the full academic year and is equivalent to the weight of 9.0 units. Students selecting this option should have attained high academic standing in at least three courses in the field in which they wish to do their research and must submit their study proposal in writing to the Commerce Program Executive Director.
PREREQUISITE Permission of the Commerce Program Executive Director.
This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 4th year of the Commerce Program.
Course weight: 9.0 units.
EXCLUSIONS COMM-501*†, COMM-502
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COMM-504†* Directed Independent Study in Consulting and Professional Service
The course is organized and managed to duplicated a professional services firm. Typical projects result in changes such as improving productivity, enhancing morale, reducing expenses, boosting cash flows, augmenting Internet and e-marketing resources, implementing marketing research, increasing client retention, strengthening brand awareness for the organization or its products and services. There are no formal classes but consulting firm meetings to discuss client progress, methodological challenges and to review and rehearse client presentations and decisions regarding key client deliverables. While the methodologies and final deliverables are reviewed for quality purposes by the professor, the final deliverables are the responsibility of the consultants and are independently developed. Once selected for the course the students sign a contact outlining duties as well as personal learning and experiential objectives. The student will be evaluated by the professor on the same basis as a member of a professional services firm. Key performance attributes include technical skills such as analytical, writing and presentation skills as well as administration and project management effectiveness. Soft skills evaluated include engagement and contribution to the firm, leadership, team effectiveness/collaboration, professionalism and client relationships. Considerable emphasis is placed on the success of the client engagement as assessed by the professor through a formal client feedback and client satisfaction survey. Since this independent study is both project-and-client based, it is very rewarding, but demanding. Students will apply and improve skills related to delivery and management of professional services, and the integration of virtually all subject matter from previous courses. Students considering a career in consulting or professional service, with previous experience in managing projects, who enjoy interacting with business people, who thrive in fluid and ever-changing project cultures, who value the importance of fostering innovative or creative environments, are strongly encouraged to apply.
PREREQUISITE Admission to the course is by application and interview.  Fourth year students may apply for the course in either the fall or winter term.  Third year students may apply only for the winter term.  While there are no formal course prerequisites, many projects do focus on issues such as consumer and promotional plans.  Students should be interested in integrating skills, tools and concepts from numerous courses, and want a course where they apply themselves in the real-world management challenges. 
Restricted to students in the Commerce Program.  
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Commerce Courses of Instruction