Queen's UniversityThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
 
  

The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar
2011-2012 Academic Year

Applied Science Courses of Instruction Mining Engineering Courses

Mining Engineering Courses
MINE 201 Introduction to Mining and Mineral Processing F 3-0-1 4
This course presents and overview of all aspects of mining from exploration, financing, development and mining operations. Underground and open pit mining are contrasted. Mineral processing systems for the production of gold, diamonds, copper, nickel, zinc and iron will be studied. Topics include decision-making process related to world market commodity pricing, mine planning and design, mining equipment, blasting and environmental considerations. Concepts of sustainability from economic, social and environmental perspective will be explored. Case studies, a major field trip and related assessment will be used to illustrate principles taught and how they are applied in a practical situation. (0/12/0/36/0)
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MINE 202 Computer Applications and Instrumentation in Mining F 0-1.5-0 1.5
This lab applies commonly used computer applications to mining engineering problems and conducts experiments with instrumentation used in surface and underground mining and mineral processing. A major field trip in conjunction with MINE 201 will be used to illustrate principles taught and how they are applied in mining operations. (0/0/0/12/6)
COREQUISITE: MINE 201
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MINE 210 Mining Systems and Methods
This course presents an overview of open pit and underground mining methods. Emphasis is placed on integration of various components of mining processes into operational systems. Topics include orebody definition, mine planning and design, mining equipment, mine services, blasting, milling and processing, environmental considerations, and mine financing. Case histories and field trips will be used throughout to illustrate principles taught and assignments will be completed based on field trip observations. (0/10/0/38/0)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~
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MINE 220 Explosives Technology
This course covers the properties of explosives and the basis for the selection of explosives for specific applications. It includes an introduction to the theory of detonation (ideal and non ideal), sensitivity, performance and numerical modelling of detonation, and the description of modern commercial explosives including typical compositions, mixing, priming and handling. Specific problems related to the use of explosives such as desensitization, sympathetic detonation, gas and dust explosions, as well as the technology associated with initiation methods are also discussed. (0/18/0/36/0)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2008/09 ~
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MINE 221 Mineral Processing Systems
This course provides an introduction to the processes used to produce unrefined metal from ore. It includes a review of mineralogy, unit operations of concentrators and smelter complexes. Particular attention is given to the processes required for the production of copper, nickel, lead, zinc and iron and their quantitative understanding through process calculations. Application of material and energy balances, heat and fluid flow to mineral and metallurgical processes is discussed. (10/18/0/26/0)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~

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MINE 224 Hydraulics for Mining Applications
The fluid mechanics basic to fluid hydraulic systems used in the mineral industry are introduced. Topics covered include properties of fluids, fluid statics and its application to mining. Hydrodynamic studies include the energy balance and Bernoulli's equation, energy losses in incompressible flow, the momentum equation and its application, and flow and pressure measuring devices. Flow in closed conduits, including series and parallel pipeline systems and pipe networks, is studied in detail and open channel flow is introduced. Applications include industrial pumps, sump design, hydraulic structures, underground mine dewatering systems, open pit mine drainage systems, and mine backfill and mine tailings transportation. (0/12/0/30/0)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~

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MINE 244 Underground Mining W 3-0-0 3
A study of underground mining technology with special reference to economic optimization in both design and production. Conventional and up to date mining methods are reviewed. Developments and trends in mining methods are closely analyzed. Mine design is studied in relation to ore reserves, tonnage and grade distribution, equipment with emphasis on the growing importance of maintenance on underground machinery and capacities of various production units. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course. The problems and possibilities of existing and evolving mining techniques are reviewed.            (0/0/0/16/20)
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MINE 262 Engineering Surveying S 1.5-0-2 3.5
This introductory course in plane surveying consists of about 16 hours of lectures, the rest of the time being spent in the field. Lecture material includes distance measurement, differential, profile and indirect leveling and use of transit, traversing and mapping. Errors, corrections and balancing are also discussed. The use of available software packages for the reduction and calculation of data is encouraged throughout the course. In the field, students practice the basic techniques of instrument use through various assignments. Careful and efficient handling of instruments and proper note-keeping are stressed. The use of state-of-the-art electronic surveying instruments is included in the field assignments wherever possible. The school is held on campus immediately following the final First Year examination in April. (0/0/0/40/0)
PREREQUISITE: Must be enrolled in Mining Engineering
EXCLUSION: CIVL 211
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MINE 267 Applied Chemistry and Instrumental Methods for Mining W 3-1-0 4
This course provides an overview of the chemistry of inorganic and organic compounds used in the practice of mining and mineral processing including hydro-and pyro- extractive methods. Chemistry and chemical interactions for selected reagent formulations used in blasting, flotation/flocculation, leaching/precipitation, solvent extraction/electrowinning and pollution control technologies are outlined with relevant stoichiometry. Steady state-state energy and materials balances are discussed. The first part of the laboratory part of the course includes principles of analytical chemistry while the second part is a review of instrumental techniques typical of analytical groups in most mining companies. Safety in handling of hazardous chemicals is emphasized with a review of selected Material Safety Data Sheets and industry standards. (0/12/0/36/0)
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MINE 307 Front Line Supervision W 1.25-0-.25 1.5

This 2 day short course provides some basic tools which will help engineering graduates when they are placed in supervisory positions in industry. The material is generic in nature and examples cover various aspects of mining (production, maintenance, mill, engineering and administration), for both surface and underground operations. Topics include: Discovering a commonality among supervisors and their key role in maintaining standards. The importance of sharing information and expectations about costs, production goals and business objectives are explored in the context of motivation. The necessity of successful communication skills and techniques are discussed and demonstrated to achieve behaviours on the job, producing consistent results. A reliable methodology for handling difficult situations is provided. The fundamental rationale for safety and loss control is presented as well as a relevant perspective on management structure. A workable code of conduct that is a guide to professional behaviour is developed.Students will be graded on a Pass/Fail system. Offered as an intensive 2 day short course on a Friday and Saturday in March. (0/0/18/0/0)

PREREQUISITE: Must be registered in Mining Engineering
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MINE 311 Geological Characterization of Mineral Deposits
The basic mineralogy and petrology of mineral deposits are examined. The formation and classification of mineral deposits, considering such aspects as tectonic setting, age, rock composition, geometry, and mineralogy are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the processes by which mineral deposits are formed and transformed, and their influence on mining and production. Laboratory work integrates geological information from the scale of thin sections to regional maps as tools to assist with mine design, estimation of ore grade and evaluation of issues related to ore processing. (0/20/0/20/8)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2008/09 ~
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MINE 321 Drilling and Blasting F 3-1.5-0 4.5
This course deals with the principles of commercial explosives technology and the application of blasting in mining and construction. The planning, design, economic considerations and trends of drilling and blasting practices in the different segments of the mining and construction industries are considered. Topics covered are detonation theory, performance and sensitivity of explosives, fragmentation prediction measurement and control, vibrations from blasting, air blast, damage and special blasting techniques used in perimeter blasting and blast design methods. (0/14/0/40/0)
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MINE 322 Mining and Sustainability
This course introduces the evolution of the principles of applied sustainability and their applications in the mining industry. Themes examined will include: the mining industry and society; the nature of the mining industry in Canada and around the world; the theory of sustainability and sustainable development; corporate social responsibility, reporting and assessment; mine closure; regulation of mine activities in Canada and elsewhere; mining and indigenous people in Canada and abroad; and future scenarios for the mining industry in North America. (0/0/18/9/9)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~
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MINE 324 Hydraulics for Mining Applications W 3-0-.5 3.5
The fluid mechanics basic to fluid hydraulic systems used in the mineral industry are introduced. Topics covered include properties of fluids, fluid statics and its application to mining. Hydrodynamic studies include the energy balance and Bernoulli's equation, energy losses in incompressible flow, the momentum equation and its application, and flow and pressure measuring devices. Flow in closed conduits, including series and parallel pipeline systems and pipe networks, is studied in detail and open channel flow is introduced. Applications include industrial pumps, sump design, hydraulic structures, underground mine dewatering systems, open pit mine drainage systems, and mine backfill and mine tailings transportation. (0/12/0/30/0)   
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MINE 325 Applied Rock Mechanics W 3-1.5-0 4.5
Elastic prototypes are developed to investigate stress conditions around mine openings. Failure theories are discussed and used to explain fracture patterns. Stereographic methods of three dimensional analysis are introduced. The presence of fault and joint development in large rock masses dictates the use of broader engineering methods than those based entirely on idealized conditions. Techniques based on empirical knowledge and supported by available theory are presented, including slope stability, open pit design, tunnels, underground structural design, rock foundations, ground water, rock bursts and bumps, and design hazards. Various instrumentation of interest is discussed. (0/0/0/54/0)
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MINE 326 Operations Research W 3-0-1.5 4.5
The course deals with the application of operations research methods in engineering with emphasis on mining applications. Topics covered are linear programming, optimization methods, transportation and network models, discrete optimization, non linear optimization, decision tree methods, simulation and elements of geostatistics as applied to mining. Lab sessions also deal with forecasting techniques, regression analysis, dispatch problems, planning and scheduling.(20/0/0/14/20)
PREREQUISITES: APSC 142 or permission of the instructor
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MINE 331 Methods of Mineral Separation F 3-1.5-0 4.5
Mineral separation processes of a physical and physicochemical nature are studied with laboratory sessions. Topics include size reduction, classification, flotation, flocculation, gravity concentration, magnetic, electrostatic separations and dewatering. Surface phenomena involving fine particle processing, reagent classifications, flotation machines and circuits, plant practice in ore flotation are discussed. The laboratory practice includes a design project on flotation circuit analysis and sizing.  Assignments will be completed based on field trip observations. (0/14/0/25/15)
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MINE 338 Mine Ventilation F 3-0-0 3
Hydraulics of air flow through mine openings and ducts is first studied, leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. The engineering design, testing, selection and application of mine ventilation fans are studied in detail. Topics related to the design of mine ventilation systems include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria, ventilation circuit design, natural ventilation, auxiliary ventilation design, psychometry, mine air heating and cooling, dust and fume control, and ventilation economics. Health hazards of mine gases, dust and radiation are reviewed, together with statutory requirements for air quality. Procedures for conducting air quantity, pressure and air quality surveys are also taught. (0/12/0/24/0)
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MINE 339 Environmental Health Engineering F 3-1.5-0 4.5
Hydraulics of air flow through mine openings and ducts is studied, leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. Topics related to the design of mine ventilation systems include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria, ventilation circuit design, natural ventilation, testing, application and selection of mine ventilation fans, auxiliary ventilation design, psychrometry, mine air heating and cooling, dust and fume control, and ventilation economics. Health hazards of mine gases, dust and radiation are reviewed, together with statutory requirements for air quality. Procedures for conducting air quantity and quality surveys are also taught.
Ventilation Laboratory: Modern laboratory instruments are used to determine the characteristics of air hydraulics, to investigate fan selection procedures and to conduct mine circuit designs. Experiments are also performed to evaluate dust and fume contents of the air and to measure radon gas and daughter products. Air flow measuring techniques to determine air flow characteristics of mine openings are studied. (0/14/0/40/0)
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MINE 341 Open Pit Mining F 3-0-1.5 4.5
The course deals with pit design, economic pit limit analysis, loading, hauling and auxiliary equipment, production scheduling and the use of computer simulation in the evaluation of load-haul-dump systems. In addition to conventional open pit design, surface coal mining methods and equipment are described with special emphasis on the engineering aspects of dragline applications. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included. Computer use in all aspects of open pit mine design is stressed, with source code software and AutoCAD made available in the computing laboratory. (14/0/0/16/24)
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MINE 359 Reliability, Maintenance, and Risk Assessment F 3-0-1 4
This course aims to impart the analytical foundations and engineering insights necessary for the reliability analysis, maintenance, and risk assessment of industrial plants and equipment. Case studies are used throughout the course. Topics addressed include: reliability and failure analysis (FMECA, HAZOP); maintenance planning policies and life cycle behaviour; organization of maintenance operations; maintenance management and information systems; condition-based maintenance (CBM); reliability centred maintenance (RCM) and RCMII; reliability growth management in design and test. (0/0/0/36/12)
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MINE 422 Mining and Sustainability F 4-0-0 4
This course introduces the evolution of the principles of applied sustainability and their applications in the mining industry. Themes examined will include: the mining industry and society; the nature of the mining industry in Canada and around the world; the theory of sustainability and sustainable development; corporate social responsibility, reporting and assessment; mine closure; regulation of mine activities in Canada and elsewhere; mining and indigenous people in Canada and abroad; and future scenarios for the mining industry in North America. (0/0/24/12/12)    
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MINE 434 Project Report F/W 1-0-3 4
In this course a formal report is required, based on industrial and/or laboratory research. Emphasis is placed on critical treatment of the data obtained to produce useful conclusions. Standing is based on the work done and on the ability of individuals to complete various phases of the project according to schedule. Normally the report is prepared during a summer work period and completed during the fall term. Participation in the departmental seminar series once per month is mandatory. (0/0/24/0/24)
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MINE 438 Project Decision-making in Extractive Metallury
The goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to use information from their undergraduate courses to make decisions on projects of the type that they may face in their future careers. The course will analyze real project case histories in extractive metallurgy and evaluate them from technical, economic, environmental, risk and management decision-making perspectives. The students will work in small groups in an interactive tutorial setting to develop each case for class presentation. There will also be opportunities for interaction with invited experts from industry. The course will highlight the key factors and tools for objective project decision-making in extractive metallurgy and their use. (0/0/0/12/24)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~
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MINE 441 Open Pit Mining
The course deals with pit design, economic pit limit analysis, loading, hauling and auxiliary equipment, production scheduling and the use of computer simulation in the evaluation of load-haul-dump systems. In addition to conventional open pit design, surface coal mining methods and equipment are described with special emphasis on the engineering aspects of dragline applications. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included. Computer use in all aspects of open pit mine design is stressed, with source code software and AutoCAD made available in the computing laboratory. (12/0/0/12/30)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~
PREREQUISITE: MINE 326
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MINE 444 Underground Mining
A study of underground mining technology with special reference to economic optimization in both design and production. Conventional and up to date mining methods are reviewed. Developments and trends in mining methods are closely analyzed. Mine design is studied in relation to ore reserves, tonnage and grade distribution, equipment with emphasis on the growing importance of maintenance on underground machinery and capacities of various production units. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course. The problems and possibilities of existing and evolving mining techniques are reviewed. (0/0/0/16/20)
~ COURSE DELETED IN 2009/10 ~

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MINE 445 Open Pit Mine Design W 1-3-1.5 5.5
The material of MINE 441 is applied to the design of an open pit mine. Special attention is given to the selection of equipment and the use of computers in mine planning and scheduling. The course uses source code software and AutoCAD in the computing laboratory to enable small groups of students (2-4) to complete mine designs starting with topography maps, drill information, and mineral inventory block models. Several real deposit databases including gold, copper, copper/molybdenum, copper/zinc and oil sand are evaluated, profitability assessed, and production decisions discussed. (0/0/20/0/46) PREREQUISITES: MINE 341 or MINE 441 and either MINE 326 or MINE 467, or permission of the instructor
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MINE 448 Underground Design W 1-1.5-3 5.5
This course provides an opportunity to apply a knowledge of basics to the design of an underground mine. Initial design information may range from diamond-drill assay data to a partially or completely designed mine. The problem of design or renovation entails ground stability, ventilation, systems analysis, equipment selection, maintenance, etc, with safety and economics as the basic criteria for design. (0/0/18/0/48)
PREREQUISITE: MINE 244 or MINE 444 or permission of the instructor
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MINE 451 Chemical Extraction of Metals F 3-0-0 3
The recovery and recycling of metals by both hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical techniques is discussed. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the solutions utilized in these processes are reviewed. The major unit operations of the hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes are studied. For hydrometallurgy, the unit operations are; ion exchange, solvent extraction, cementation, purification, precipitation, electrowinning and electrorefining. Particular emphasis will be placed on the recovery of gold. For pyrometallurgy the unit operations are; roasting, agglomeration, calcination, smelting, converting, refining and electrolysis. In the course, the importance of environmental stewardship in metal extraction is stressed. (0/10/0/16/10)
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MINE 455 Design, Analysis and Operation of Mineral Processes F 3-1.5-0 4.5
 Engineering elements of a mineral processing project are examined from the concept stage to process design. Flowsheet evaluation, process equipment selection and layout, capital and operating costs, operating and control strategies are considered for real problems. (0/0/0/0/54) PREREQUISITES: MINE 331, or permission of the instructor
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MINE 458 Process Investigations W 1-3-0 4
Projects may involve design of new processes, re-design of existing processes, process simulation and process innovation. Oral presentations and a formal report are required at the end of the term. (0/0/0/0/48) PREREQUISITES: MINE 455 or permission of the instructor
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MINE 460 Special Topics in Mining Engineering F/W 3-1.5-0 4.5
This course will change from year to year as subjects of special interest to mining engineers arise, or as special staff are available. (0/0/0/27/27)
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MINE 461 Engineering Project for International Students F/W/S 0-3-0 3
This course is for students registered at a university outside Canada who wish to do a term at Queen's to satisfy the requirements of their home university or exchange program. The student will work with a professor who has agreed to act as a supervisor. The time frame and requirements for course completion will be agreed upon by the supervising professor at Queen's, and a faculty member of the university for which the student is fulfilling the work term requirement. (0/0/0/0/36)
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MINE 462 Occupational Health and Safety in Mining Practice W 3-0-.5 3.5
Affirms a societal rationale and framework for due diligence in health, safety and environment (HS&E). Considers the five principal categories of workplace environmental factors that may lead to ill health / death, and introduces the principles (strategies and techniques) of exposure assessment (relative to both regulatory and professional standards) and control, as part of the Anticipation-Recognition-Evaluation-Communication-Control sequence. Enables the student to resolve, by means of memorandum, a specific topical occupational health issue. In addition to providing the basic tools for undertaking occupational health risk assessment / management, reviews fundamental chemical (non-toxicological) hazards and risk parameters. (0/0/42/0/0) PREREQUISITES: Completion of 3rd year Mining Engineering or permission of the instructor.
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MINE 467 Geostatistics and Orebody Modelling F 3-1.5-0 4.5
This course introduces those principals of geostatistics used in evaluating grade distribution in orebodies from drillhole data. Basic concepts of spatial distributions, sampling, distance weighted averages, and variograms are covered. Cases from practice will be employed to illustrate concepts. Use of commercially available software to carry out geostatistical calculations and graphical representation will be made. Utilizing these techniques, students will develop a block model of ore grade distribution for an orebody and then apply this model to a mine pre-feasibility study in a subsequent course. (16/0/0/14/24) PREREQUISITES: MINE 326, or permission of the instructor
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MINE 469 Stability Analysis in Mine Design F 3-0-1 4
Application of rock mechanics principles to mine design. Includes planning and execution of geotechnical investigation programs, empirical and analytical methods of stability analysis and support design. Numerical methods are introduced, with emphasis on how to choose among them for particular applications and how to evaluate results. Instrumentation programs are described. Methods are illustrated using case histories.(12/0/0/12/24) PREREQUISITES: MINE 325 or equivalent
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MINE 471 Mine-Mechanical Design Project W 1-1.5-3 5.5
This course involves a design project with emphasis on the mechanical aspects of mine or plant design and operation. Typical topics include mobile equipment, materials handling, automation, equipment redesign and systems integration. (0/0/18/0/48) PREREQUISITES: Completion of 3rd Year or permission of the instructor
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Applied Science Courses of Instruction Mining Engineering Courses
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