Queen's UniversityThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
 
  

The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar
2011-2012 Academic Year

Applied Science Courses of Instruction Applied Science Courses

Applied Science Courses
APSC 100 Engineering Practice FW 4-2-5 11
This course introduces fundamental professional engineering skills and provides an opportunity to apply engineering science and mathematics content in situations emulating professional practice. It consists of three modules: Module 1. Problem analysis and modeling; Module 2. Experimentation and measurement; Module 3: Engineering design. The course provides an introduction to personal learning styles, team dynamics, oral and written presentation skills, laboratory data collection, analysis and presentation, project management, information management, problem analysis and modeling, numeric computation, economics, design methodologies, and workplace safety. (6/16/40/40/30)
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APSC 111 Mechanics F 3-0-.5 3.5
An introduction to Newtonian mechanics in the context of engineering applications. Lecture topics are: vectors, motion of a particle, particle dynamics, work and energy, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, oscillators, waves, conservation of energy, momentum, and collisions. (0/42/0/0/0)
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APSC 112 Electricity and Magnetism W 3-0-.5 3.5
This course continues from APSC 111 to introduce electricity and further develop fundamental ideas of mechanics in the context of engineering applications. Lecture topics include: electrical current and resistance, EMF, D.C. circuits and electrical measurements, electric charge, electric field and potential, magnetic fields and their origin, electromagnetic induction, dynamics of rigid bodies, oscillations, waves. (0/31/0/11/0) PREREQUISITES:  APSC 111 and APSC 171
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APSC 131 Chemistry and Materials F 3-0-.5 3.5
This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of materials: thermochemistry, heat, work, internal energy, enthalpy and the first law of thermodynamics; gas laws in ideal and non-ideal systems; phase equilibria in one component systems; concepts of bonding in the classification of materials; the physical, electrical and mechanical properties of metals, polymers, semiconductors and ceramics; techniques of characterizing materials. (0/31/0/11/0)
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APSC 132 Chemistry and the Environment W 3-0-.5 3.5
This course examines several environmental topics, and the relevant background chemistry. The chemistry includes black body radiation, the second law of thermodynamics, Gibbs energy and equilibrium, fuels, acid-base chemistry, and gas phase kinetics. Environmental topics include ozone depletion, acid rain, air quality, global warming and the environmental impact of various energy conversion processes. (0/31/0/11/0) PREREQUISITE:  APSC 131
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APSC 141 Personal Computers in Engineering
The course provides an introduction to the role and application of computers and computing in modern engineering practice. The course is divided into modules covering the application of personal computer software to symbolic analysis and data analysis, and in the preparation of technical reports and presentations. Each module will be examined separately. Students must pass all modules to pass the course. (0/0/0/24/0)
~COURSE DELETED in 2010-11~
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APSC 142 Introduction to Computer Programming for Engineers W 2-1-0 3
This course introduces concepts, theory and practice of computer programming.  Implementation uses microcomputers. The emphasis is on the design of correct and efficient algorithms and on programming style. Applications are made to engineering problems. (0/0/0/24/12)
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APSC 151 Earth Systems and Engineering F 3-1-0 4
This course provides an introduction to the complex Earth System (which encompasses the solid earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere), and our interactions with it. Using the Earth System as a framework, and coupled with the over-arching theme of sustainability, key concepts/issues relevant to engineers are dealt with, including: population demographics and resource usage; geopolitics; modeling of "fuzzy" systems; risk assessment and risk management; local- and global-scale impacts of engineering works on the government; short- and long-term natural and anthropogenic changes (including global warming); moral and ethical considerations.  (0/24/12/12/0)
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APSC 161 Engineering Graphics F 2-1.5-0 3.5
The principal objective of this course is to develop the ability to visualize and communicate three dimensional shapes. Standard engineering methods are covered. (0/0/0/31/11) 
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APSC 171 Calculus I F 3-0-.5 3.5
Functions, limits, derivatives; optimization, rate problems, exponentials, logarithms, inverse trigonometric functions; exponential growth as an example of a differential equation. Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Riemann integral; applications to problems involving areas, volumes, mass, charge, work, etc. Some integration techniques. (42/0/0/0/0)
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APSC 172 Calculus II W 3-0-.5 3.5
More integration techniques; numerical integration, improper integrals. Curves, speed, velocity. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, differentials, error estimates, gradient, maxima and minima. Sequences, series, power series; Taylor polynomial approximations. Double and triple integrals, polar and cylindrical coordinates; applications to mass, center of mass, moment, etc. (42/0/0/0/0) PREREQUISITE:  APSC 171
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APSC 174 Introduction to Linear Algebra W 3-0-.5 3.5
Vectors, dot and cross products, lines and planes, projections. Vectors in n-space. Systems of Linear equations. Matrix algebra and linear transformations, inverses. Spaces and subspaces. Linear independence, basis and coordinates, dimension, rank. Determinants, Cramer's Rule. Eigenvectors, eigenvalues and diagonalization with applications. Orthonormal bases and symmetric matrices. (42/0/0/0/0)
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APSC 190 Professional Engineering Skills
This course is intended to be an introduction to issues associated with professional engineering practice and with the impact of engineering on society. Topics include the role and responsibility of the professional engineer in society, discussions of ethics, of health and safety, and of equity in the workplace. Opportunities will also be provided to develop skills in communications, creative problem-solving, and teamwork. (0/0/42/0/0)
~COURSE DELETED in 2010-11~ 
NOTE: Available to first year BSCE students only.
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APSC 191 Professional Engineering Skills FW 1.25-0-2.25 3.5
This course is identical in content to APSC 190.  The material normally delivered in APSC 190 in the first week of the winter term will be covered in evening sessions in the fall term in APSC 191.  (0/0/42/0/0) NOTE:  Available to upper year BSCE students only
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APSC 200 Engineering Design and Practice II F/W 3-0-1 4
In this course students will participate constructively on teams to create solutions to open-ended complex problems, using standard design methods and tools. This project-based course provides instruction primarily in the first 6 weeks of the semester focusing on problem scoping, creativity and idea generation, decision making incorporating technical, economic, societal, and environmental factors, safety, engineering codes and regulations, and engineering ethics. The final 6 weeks of the course centre around a design project delivered by each discipline. This course is integrated with APSC-293, and coordinated by the same instructor. (0/0/12/0/36) PREREQUISITE: APSC 100
COREQUISITE: APSC 293
EXCLUSION: MECH 212
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APSC 221 Economics and Business Practices in Engineering F/W 3-0-0 3
This course will provide the student in the Engineering program with the ability to appropriately incorporate selected economic and business practices into the practice of engineering. The practices covered include: business planning for the enterprise, enterprise economic analysis, project management process, project economic analysis, risk analysis and management, quality management and change management. Assignments and examples are based on situations from engineering based industries. (0/0/42/0/0)
EXCLUSIONS: APSC 321, COMM 244
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APSC 262 Engineering Surveying  N (8 days) 1.5-0-2 3.5
This introductory course in plane surveying consists of about 16 hours of lectures, the rest of the time being spent in the field. Lecture material includes distance measurement, differential, profile and indirect leveling and use of transit, traversing and mapping. Errors, corrections and balancing are also discussed. The use of available software packages for the reduction and calculation of data is encouraged throughout the course. In the field, students practice the basic techniques of instrument use through various assignments. Careful and efficient handling of instruments and proper note-keeping are stressed. The use of state-of-the-art electronic surveying instruments is included in the field assignments wherever possible. The school is held on campus immediately following the final First Year examination in April. (0/0/0/40/0)
EXCLUSION: CIVL 211
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APSC 291 Engineering Communications I F .5-0-.75 1.25
This course provides an introduction to effective engineering writing and speaking skills with the emphasis on technical proposals, professional correspondence, engineering reports, and oral briefings. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials. (0/0/12/0/0)
PREREQUISITE: Permission of Instructor
EXCLUSIONS: CHEE 260, ELEC 291, GEOE 291 (GEOL 291), GEOE 292 (GEOL 292), MECH 290
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APSC 292 Engineering Communications II W .5-0-.75 1.25
This course continues to develop skills in engineering writing and speaking from APSC 291, focusing on product specifications and evaluations, engineering reports, and formal oral presentations. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials. (0/0/12/0/0)
~COURSE DELETED in 2011-2012
PREREQUISITE: APSC 291
EXCLUSIONS: CHEE 260, ELEC 291, ELEC 391, MECH 290, GEOE 291 (GEOL 291), GEOE 292 (GEOL 292)
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APSC 293 Engineering Communications F/W .25-0-.75 1
This course provides an introduction to effective engineering writing and speaking skills with the emphasis on professional correspondence, engineering reports, oral briefings, and formal oral presentations. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials. This course is integrated with APSC-200, and coordinated by the same instructor. (0/0/12/0/0) PREREQUISITE: APSC 100
COREQUISITE: APSC 200 or permission of instructor
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APSC 301 Professional Internship NS 3
The professional internship involves spending a minimum of twelve months and a maximum of sixteen months in a paid internship position in industry or government. Students in the 12-month internship must register in APSC 302, APSC 303 and either APSC 301 or APSC 304. Students in the 16 month placement take APSC 301, APSC 302, APSC 303 and APSC 304. The nature of the work must satisfy the criteria defining professional experience for licensure as a Professional Engineer in Canada. The course includes prior workshops on interviewing, resume preparation and work performance. Successful completion of the course requires submission of a report of high quality on the experience within thirty days of completion of the work period. Career Services manage the non-academic aspects of the course. PREREQUISITE:  Faculty English Proficiency Test, or 80% in ESLA 130 taken prior to the 2004 - 2005 academic session, and completion of at least two years of any program in Applied Science with a cumulative average of at least 65% or recommendation of the department.
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APSC 302 Professional Internship F 3
See APSC 301.
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APSC 303 Professional Internship W  3
See APSC 301.
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APSC 304 Professional Internship NS  .75
See APSC 301.
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APSC 321 Economic and Business Practices in Mining and Geological Engineering F 3-0-.5 3.5
This course will provide the student in the Mining Engineering or Geological Engineering program with the ability to appropriately incorporate selected economic and business practices into the practice of engineering. The practices covered include: business planning for the enterprise, enterprise economic analysis, project management process, project economic analysis, risk analysis and management, quality management and change management. Assignments, examples, and tutorials are based on current situations from the Mining and Geological Engineering based industries. (0/0/42/0/0)
EXCLUSIONS: APSC 221, COMM 244, GEOL 472
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APSC 381 Fundamentals of Design Engineering W 3-0-.5 3.5
Successful engineering design requires a broad combination of knowledge and skills, as well as an ability to work and communicate across engineering disciplines. Based on industry practice, the objective of this multidisciplinary course is to provide the student with a sound background in engineering design methodology and supporting design "tools". A broad range of topics spanning the problem definition through to design validation and implementation will be covered. Relevant and realistic supporting exercises and assignments will augment the lecture material. Students will work in multi-disciplinary teams, simulating the real-world design engineering environment. This course will provide sound footing for 4th year design projects in any program, and is a prerequisite for an elective multi-disciplinary final year design project course (APSC 480). PREREQUISITES:  Successful completion of 2nd year core engineering courses or permission of the course instructor. Students must be currently registered in Year 3 of BSCE program; Year 4 students may contact the course instructor to request permission to register.
NOTE: APSC 381 is primarily intended as a preparatory course for final year engineering project courses. Students who have already taken or who would be concurrently registered in their final year project must have permission from the course instructor to register in APSC 381.
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APSC 400 Technology, Engineering and Management (TEAM) F 1.5-0-0 W 2-3-0 6.5
Where appropriate, multidiscipline teams of engineering, commerce, law, and science students act as consultants to industrial and governmental clients. Projects include a phase of self directed problem definition and project scope definition in the fall term, followed by project execution in the winter term. Typical projects involve evaluation of technical alternatives (with an emphasis on health, safety, and environmental), preparation of detailed recommendations, and both market and financial analysis. Project topics vary widely and are provided by a diverse list of fee paying clients. The course includes seminars on project management. There are several meetings during the Fall term to organize groups and select projects, but regularly scheduled lectures do not begin until the Winter term. Teams interact regularly with clients at both a technical and a management level, and are also assigned an industrial project mentor. Students manage their own budget, travel arrangements etc. The course concludes with a comprehensive report and presentation at the client’s office. The course is managed by the Department of Chemical Engineering. Further information, including a list of projects, can be found at: http://team.appsci.queensu.ca/ (0/0/21/29/28) PREREQUISITE: All places are subject to the availability of suitable projects.
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APSC 480 Multi-disciplinary Design Project FW 2-6-1 9
Building on the design engineering fundamentals learned in APSC 381, the objective of this course is to further develop the student's design, innovation, and professional skills. Working in multi-disciplinary teams, students will engage in real-world design projects typically offered by industry based clients. While designing a product, process, or system, design processes will be applied from problem definition through validation of physical prototype or digital/mathematical models. Professional engineering skills such as communication, teamwork, project management, engineering economics, ethics, and safety will be integral to the projects. Accompanying lectures, exercises, tutorials, and guest speakers will augment the projects. (0/0/28/0/80) PREREQUISITE:  APSC 381
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Applied Science Courses of Instruction Applied Science Courses
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