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Queen's University
 

Ian Chin-Sang - Associate Professor

ChinSang.jpg Research: My lab is interested in the process of morphogenesis, the development of shape and form.  What are the molecules that regulate the behavior of cells as they change their shape, position and adhesiveness to generate their three-dimensional form during morphogenesis? The answer to this question will certainly add to our understanding of the role of cell adhesion and cell signaling during tissue inflammation and metastasis. We use the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to study simple examples of morphogenetic movements. The well defined anatomy of C. elegans will allow us to analyze these processes at a level of precision not easily attainable in other organisms. My lab uses genetic, molecular biology, biochemistry, and state of the art video microscopy techniques to elucidate the mechanisms by which tissues and organs are generated. In previous work we have shown that ephrin signaling is required for proper C. elegans morphogenesis.

Ephrin Signaling in C. elegans:

The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands, the ephrins, are an exciting class of molecules that play a wide variety of roles in development, including axon guidance, blood vessel formation and cancer. C. elegans mutants that are defective in ephrin signaling have abnormal morphogenetic cell movements during embryogenesis and as a result usually die . The identification of ephrins and their receptor in an animal amenable to genetics makes it feasible to dissect the entire network of ephrin signaling in an organism. To understand the roles of Eph signaling during C. elegans development we will identify the downstream genes of the Eph receptor and how other genes might act redundantly or in parallel with Eph signaling during morphogenesis. These studies complement the approaches taken to understand Eph signaling in more complex animals and will expedite our understanding in the signal transduction pathways controlling morphogenesis. Further, Eph signaling has been linked to events of vertebrate neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and cancer, the latter of which is a prime candidate for anti-tumor therapies. It is expected that work done in model organisms will generate mechanistic information required to improve the efficacy of such treatments.

»» Lab Website »« email: chinsang@queensu.ca »« telephone: 613-533-6124 ««

Some Recent Publications:

  • Jun Liu, Stacy Visser-Grieve, Jeffrey Boudreau, Benjamin Yeung, Samantha Lo, Gabriel Chamberlain, Fabian Yu, Tao Sun, Tony Papanicolau, Annie Lam, Xiaolong Yang, Ian Chin-Sang (2013). Insulin Activates the Insulin Receptor to Down-regulate the PTEN Tumor Suppressor. Oncogene 2013 Sep 2. doi: 10.1038/onc.2013.347.
  • Michael Miller and Ian Chin-Sang (2012). Eph Receptor Signaling in C. elegans. WormBook, ed. The C. elegans Research Community, WormBook 2012 Nov 29:1-17. doi: 10.1895/wormbook.1.151.1.
  • Ahmed Mohamed, Jeffrey Boudreau, Fabian Yu, Jun Liu and Ian D. Chin-Sang (2012). The Caenorhabditis elegans Eph receptor activates NCK and N-WASP, and inhibits Ena/VASP to regulate growth cone dynamics during axon guidance. PLoS Genetics2012;8(2):e1002513. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002513.
  • Ahmed M. Mohamed and Ian D. Chin-Sang (2011). The C. elegans nck-1 gene encodes two isoforms and is required for neuronal guidance. Developmental Biology 2011 Jun 1;354(1):55-66. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.03.019.
  • Sarah Brisbin, Jun Liu, Jeff Boudreau, Jimmy Peng, Marie Evangelista, and Ian Chin-Sang (2009). A Role for C. elegans Eph RTK Signaling in PTEN Regulation. Developmental Cell 2009 Oct;17(4):459-69. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2009.08.009.
  • Ahmed M. Mohamed and Ian D. Chin-Sang (2011). The C. elegans nck-1 gene encodes two isoforms and is required for neuronal guidance. Developmental Biology  354: 55-66. 
  • Sarah Brisbin, Jun Liu, Jeff Boudreau, Jimmy Peng, Marie Evangelista, and Ian Chin-Sang (2009). A Role for C. elegans Eph RTK Signaling in PTEN Regulation. Developmental Cell 17(4) 459-469
  • William G. Bendena, Jeffrey R. Boudreau, Tony Papanicolaou, Matt Maltby, Stephen S. Tobe  and  Ian D. Chin-Sang (2008). A Caenorhabditis elegans allatostatin/galanin-like receptor NPR-9 inhibits local search behaviour in response to feeding cues.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105(4):1339-42.
  • Mohamed, A., and Chin-Sang, Ian D. (2006). Characterization of Loss-of-Function and Gain-of-Function Eph Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in C. elegans axon guidance and cell migration. Developmental Biology 290:1:164-176.
  • Ghenea, S., Boudreau, J.R., Lague, N.P. and Chin-Sang, Ian D. (2005).  The VAB-1 Eph Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and SAX-3/Robo neuronal Receptors function together during C. elegans embryonic morphogenesis. Development 132, 3679-3690.
  • Ian Chin-Sang (2005). The C. elegans VAB-1/Eph receptor tyrosine kinase functions with the SAX-3/Robo receptor during cell movements and axon guidance. Abstract Published in Developmental Biology 283 (2): 575.

Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000